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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German

This page was created at 7:15 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in German
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for GERMAN

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for German.


GERMAN 101. Elementary Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hmr/101/Kursseite.html

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science, to Literature and Philosophy.

By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung
  • Dollenmayer & Hansen Arbeitsbuch for Vorsprung
  • Coursepack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 102. Elementary Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hmr/102/Kursseite.html

German 102 is the continuation of German 101; please see above for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth term. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung
  • Dollenmayer & Hansen Arbeitsbuch for Vorsprung
  • Coursepack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended Texts for "Free Reading" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bürger: Münchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps für Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 103. Review of Elementary German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juerg Friedrich (jfriedri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100, 101, or 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hmr/103/Kursseite.html

German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to take advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty 232 courses (see above) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts

  • Widmaier & Widmaier: Treffpunkt Deutsch, 3rd ed.
  • Widmaier, Widmaier & Thomas: Arbeitsbuch for Treffpunkt Deutsch, 3rd ed.
  • Coursepack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Treffpunkt Deutsch (Available at the LRC)

Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German
  • Vocabulary tapes for Treffpunkt Deutsch (Available at the LRC)
  • Student Tapes for Treffpunkt Deutsch (Available at the LRC)

Recommended Texts for "Free Reading" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bürger: Münchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps für Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, and one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. This course does not satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 206. Conversation Practice.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103. Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level German conversation course may not register for German 205 or 206. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this class may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in German 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous German 305 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 231. Second-Year Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hmr/231/Kursseite.html

In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. Reading texts include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts.

By the end of the course, students will be able to read and write about short texts from periodicals and textbooks, and classic texts by Nietzsche and others, independently, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.) regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes.

Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. By the end of the course, students should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and converse fairly comfortably in a German-speaking country. In particular, they should be ready to embark on an introduction to the study in German of an academic discipline of their choice in one of the specialty 232 courses.

Required Text

  • Coursepack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]

  • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

    Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack; more info on these books is on the main 221/231 course page]

  • Brothers Grimm: Grimms Märchen
  • Anne Frank: Tagebuch
  • Max Frisch: Andorra
  • Urs Widmer: Liebesbrief für Mary

    Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German
  • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik)

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course, students complete the four-term introductory language sequence by selecting one of several "special topics" courses intended as an introduction to the study of an academic discipline, such as Music, Philosophy, History, or Science, in German. Students should emerge from the course prepared and motivated to do work (or read for pleasure) in German in this field throughout their academic career and beyond. Students are strongly encouraged to arrange their schedules so they can enroll in the section whose topic interests them the most, in order to get the maximum benefit from this course.

    Interest in the course content is the most effective motivation for language study, and students can emerge from 232 with the genuine pride in what they are able to do with their German. More generally, by the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    The special topics and course requirements for this term's sections are given below.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 002 Ego Angst, and Schadenfreude: German Psychology and its Contexts

    Instructor(s): Erik Schleef

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course, students will get an overview of the major schools of psychology in the German speaking countries and develop skills in talking and writing about basic psychological concepts in German. The course will begin with a short overview of German schools of psychology and a more detailed look at Wilhelm Wundt, who founded the world's first psychological institute in Leipzig in 1879, and then at Freud, which will give us a chance to compare the stereotypes about psychoanalysis with some of Freud's writings in the original German. We will then deal with specific aspects and phenomena of psychology, such as aggressive behavior, personality typology and personality tests, developmental psychology, personality disorders, communication and language, and other topics. German language texts and videos will form the basis for in class discussions. Course requirements will include weekly quizzes, written homework and reading assignments, oral presentations, three essays and a final group project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 003 GERMAN FOR MUSIC

    Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will focus on German as expressed in lyrics and music.

    Readings and compositions in German will include German song cycles of Schubert, Schumann, Wolf, Mahler, and others. We will also study highlights of German operas from Mozart's MAGIC FLUTE, Weber's FREISCHUETZ, a little of Wagner's RING, and others according student interest. We will include background readings on culture and musical history. Our goal is to sing some Lieder and arias in class, but there are no musical prerequisites for this section.

    The language of instruction is German.

    Students will be evaluated on class participation, grammar exercises, essays, oral presentations, a final exam.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 004 CONTEMPORARY GERMAN SOCIETY.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Vanvalkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    While building a basic vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading a variety of authentic texts dealing with such current issues as German's geographic location; Germany's recent history and the need to come to terms with its past; the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society and business world; foreigners in German society and workplace; and the evolution of the European Union.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 005 Mathematical and Scientific German.

    Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hmr/232Wissenschaftsdeutsch/Kursseite.html

    This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

    In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

    In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    Required Text

  • Coursepack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 006 LEGAL GERMAN:TRIALS AND CONSTITUTION

    Instructor(s): Hubert Rast

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    What should we do with murderers? Kill them? Imprison them for life? Is murder acceptable under certain circumstances? Is capital punishment murder? What is the relationship between "duty" and murder? These and similar questions will be pursued in this course on ethical and moral issues and their relationship to the law. We will deal with ethics and questions of personal responsibility under dictatorship (we will read excerpts from the Eichmann and the Nürnberg trials, that deal with the crimes committed under the Nazi Regime, as well as the trials of Honnecker and Krenz, the disposed leaders of the former GDR). We will study in depth Fritz Lang´s classic film M and read Friedrich Dürrenmatt's play Der Richter und sein Henker (The Judge and his executioner).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 007 Mathematical and Scientific German.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hmr/232Wissenschaftsdeutsch/Kursseite.html

    This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

    In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

    In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 008 Classics of German Literature.

    Instructor(s): Juerg Friedrich (jfriedri@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This section offers an introduction to German literature through the reading of some of the most important texts in German (as well as world) literature. Our readings will proceed backwards, from Dürrenmatt (20th century) to Lessing (18th century), passing by such other eminent authors as Kafka, Heine, Goethe, and Schiller.

    Through these texts we will not only deal with literary history, but also touch upon political and social developments, and central issues of German culture. In Pursuit of this goal we will read the texts at a moderate pace to allow ample opportunity for exploring their meaning and discussing them under a large variety of aspects and perspectives. This means that class participation will be strongly encouraged and, in order to improve both speaking and writing skills in German, a fair amount of writing will be integral to the course.

    Text used: Dürrenmatt, Friedrich. Der Besuch der alten Dame, ed. Paul Kurt Ackermann, Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company,

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 009 Art History.

    Instructor(s): Michael R Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is designed as an introduction to some of the central issues of nineteenth- and twentieth-century art history in Germany. The course devotes special attention to the relationship between visual and linguistic and literary forms of expression. We will look at artwork that seeks to translate literary texts into a visual medium, but we will also consider the relationship between more theoretical written texts and the visual manifestation of these ideas.

    In addition to texts from within the discipline of art history, we will consider the writings of artists themselves, and examine how these writings reinforce as well as complicate the meanings we seek in visual representation. The course includes numerous slide presentations, the examination of images in the University Museum collection, and a trip to the Detroit Institute of the Arts. Taught in German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 241. Introduction to German Studies.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 Visual Culture in the Third Reich: Visual art, architecture, design, film, advertising and propaganda

    Instructor(s): Michael R Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

    Foriegn Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Visual art, architecture, design, film, advertising and propaganda in Nazi Germany. The course will examine the ideological appropriation of visual information, the question of a distinctly "fascist" aesthetics, the debates to determine what constituted a distinctly "German" form of visual expression, and the efforts to create monumental visual spectacles as an expression of a national will to power. We will also investigate the visual record of the attempts to codify a "racial" German identity, and to characterize the myriad identities considered inferior and undesirable in the new state. Readings in English (additional optional material in German). All discussions in English.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 300. German Grammar and Composition.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course will also provide a systematic review of German grammar. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

    Students will practice writing in various formats (weekly journals, five formal essays of at least 5 pages each, grammar homework). There will be three hour exams and a final.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 306. Conversation Practice.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level German conversation course may not register for German 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Students entering this stage of the German conversation cycle do not need to have taken German 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a German 325 (or higher) class. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to fully appreciate life in German-speaking communities.

    In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 319. German for Engineering and Industry (LAC).

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (1). (Excl).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hmr/319/Kursseite.html

    In this course, students will work on the linguistic skills needed for an internship (or permanent employment) with a German engineering or manufacturing company. The first half of the course will focus on readings on cars, computers, and other topics to be determined in accordance with students' interests. In the second half of the term, there will be a presentation by a panel of students who have previously been on internships in German-speaking countries, as well as one or more guest lectures in German and English by employees of area businesses with connections to Germany, such as Daimler-Chrysler. In addition, students will do two group presentations: one on a German company of their choice, and the second describing e.g. a production process or how something works. Ideally, students' presentations will refer to a company with which they have arranged or are trying to arrange an internship. Each week, students will individually choose a list of 20 vocabulary words to learn based on their readings, i.e., each student will learn vocabulary that is relevant to his or her specific interests. Students will also write a short and informal weekly journal on their work in the course.

    Text:

  • Patrick Stevenson. 1997. The German speaking world: A practical introduction to sociolinguistic issues. London: Routlege

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 322/Hist. 322. The Origins of Nazism.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning, Scott D Spector

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

    R&E

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/history/322/001.nsf

    See History 322.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 001 The World According to Alma.

    Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    As we read selections from Alma Mahler Werfel's autobiography, Mein Leben, we shall look into the lives and works of artists, writers, composers, and political figures with whom she came into contact, including her several lovers and spouses, and try to understand one of the paradoxes of early 20th-century Vienna, namely how art could flourish so brilliantly in the shadow of impending chaos. Readings from Alma's autobiography will be supplemented by videos, paintings by Oskar Kokoschka, Gustav Klimt, Egon Scheele, musical compositions by herself, Arnold Schönberg, Alban Berg, Ernst Krenek and Gustav Mahler, and passages from the works of contemporary writers and political figures.

    Class time will be devoted to students' oral presentations, viewing videos and paintings, listening to music, surveying the politics and society of the time, and discussions. Matters of grammar and style will be treated according to the needs of the students. Requirements: one brief oral presentation per week, active participation in class discussions, one short written report every second week, and one 10-page term paper. Alles auf Deutsch, natürlich. Required text: a course pack. Optional but strongly recommended: Martin Durrell, Hammer's German Grammar and Usage, 3rd ed., and a good German-English/English-German dictionary.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 002 German Youth Cultures.

    Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Love Parade, Fettes Brot, and Lodown: Youth cultures, their terminologies and styles, develop and disappear quickly. They stress difference, creativity, and-above all-individuality. Through their multifariousness, German youth cultures and the concomitant aesthetic are loosely defined, and this facet sustains the flexible component in our class.

    This course delves then into the popular forms, creative activities and political orientations of youths within the 80s and 90s. Encountering these specific cultural manifestations (music, film, publications), we will try to find a methodology pertinent to approach this "deutsche Besonderheit der Mythos Jugend" (Griese). The formal requirements include readings, weekly essays, short grammar tests, motivated physical and oral presence.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 003 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND GERMAN CULTURE, PAST AND PRESENT."

    Instructor(s): Kevin S Amidon

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course provides students with an opportunity to combine their pursuit of deeper interests in science, technology, and culture with their further study of the German language. The history and contemporary context of several major scientific and technological issues (especially as they relate to Germany and German-speaking countries) will form the basis for class discussions, presentations, and writing. These issues include biology, genetics, and bioethics; nuclear physics and atomic politics; and the links between German science and industry. The course is also designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop and discuss their own ideas and interests, and to integrate these interests into their class discussions and assignments.

    The course will be conducted in German, with the goal of improving reading, writing, and speaking abilities. Through the course of the term, students (both alone and in groups) will develop topics of special interest to them, with the goal of successfully presenting what they have learned to the class in German, and culminating in a final presentation. Written work will consist of regular journal entries (some on paper, some as e-mail discussions) and some longer analytical assignments (presented as essays on paper, web pages, or in other formats). Reading materials will be partially set by the instructor, and partially provided by students in the course of their investigations (in consultation with the instructor). Students will make two major presentations to the class (in groups or individually), one in the middle of the term and one at the end. Finally, specific problems in German grammar, vocabulary, and usage will be discussed, driven largely by students' own concerns and questions. Regular short quizzes will address these issues. Grading will be based generally evenly on quizzes, written work, presentations, and energy of participation in class work and discussions.

    Students who have completed German 232: Mathematical and Scientific German are particularly welcome, but no special prior knowledge is assumed, and the course is open to all who have passed or been placed beyond a German 232 course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 005 VICTIMS OF THE HOLOCAUST.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Vanvalkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will deal primarily with victims of the Holocaust, particularly the Roma, about which there has been a recent increase in interest. Using a variety of genres and film, students will use this topic to expand their command of written and spoken German. Language of instruction is German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 329. Independent Study.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    GERMAN 331. Contemporary German Film.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 East German Film. Meets with Film/Video 441.001.

    Instructor(s): James Clark Farmer

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

    Foriegn Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The first East German film, "The Murderers Are Among Us," was shot in the rubble of post-war Berlin. The last East German film, the gay-themed romance "Coming Out," was released the same day that the Berlin Wall fell. Ten years after reunification, it is now possible to look back at this body of films with some distance, and what we find is often surprising. For alongside the socialist-realist films and propaganda newsreels is a body of work that is both artistically innovative and politically complex. Filmmakers were caught between the often contradictory demands of the official state ideology, their desire for personal and artistic expression, a utopian political impulse to create a more human version of socialism, and the wish to appeal to the needs of spectators who wanted to see the realities and problems of their own lives represented on the screen, as well as wanting to be entertained. The result was a number of films that reflected the lived contradictions of life behind the Wall.

    This course offers a history of East German cinema, as well as films made after reunification by former East Germans. Specific issues to be examined include confrontations with the Nazi past, the East German reinventions of genre films such as the Western, the influence of new wave cinemas, the image of women, the attempt to address a youth audience, and the importance of films that were produced but then banned by the government.

    Students will be expected to complete a major research paper as well as several small assignments. Attendance at the films and thoughtful participation in class discussions are required. Reading knowledge of German is not a requirement.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 349. Working in Germany.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Vanvalkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 231, plus an offer of a summer internship. (1). (Excl).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will prepare students for the experience of a summer internship with a German company. It will help them prepare for the practicalities of living in a German-speaking country for a longer period of time. Topics to be studied include documents and bureaucratic structures, cultural sensitivity, German business practices, and practical aspects of everyday life in Germany. This course is intended for any student about to embark on a summer internship in Germany. One hour per week. Discussion.

    Students will read and discuss a selection of apposite readings; learn and be tested on the specialized vocabularies of German bureaucracy and business; and write three 3-page papers, in German, on German social forms and business practices.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 351. Practice in Business German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Vanvalkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Internship in a German-speaking country. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course allows students to receive credit for an internship in a German-speaking country completed previous to registering for the course. During the term, the student will complete and turn in a three part report written in German. Part one will be a research paper on the city, area, and country where the student completed the internship. Part two will be a research paper on the company or business which provided the internship. Part three will be a longer journal concerning the daily conduct of the internship and the living situation. Finally, the student will make an oral presentation concerning the internship to either the 350 or the 430 Business German Class.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 381. Eighteenth to Nineteenth-Century Drama.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course provides an introduction to German literature of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries through several of the great dramas of the period. In conjunction with German 382, 383, 384, or 385 this course can be elected in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The course will include the following texts by Lessing, Goethe, Kleist, Grabbe, and Büchner. The emphasis of the course is on the analysis of the works, mainly in class discussions. The instructor will also provide background information on the playwrights, their times, and the artistic theories they represent. There will be one longer interpretive paper, a midterm exam, and a final exam. These may be written in German or English. The language of instruction is German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 383. German Lyric Poetry.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Timothy H Bahti (timbahti@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    German lyric poetry is as good as that of any Western literature. It is also often surprisingly easy to understand and appreciate, and it serves as an excellent tool for better learning the German language. In this course, we will introduce ourselves to German lyric poems from several centuries and from various forms, studying works on such topics as love, nature, war, religion, death, art, and history.

    The goal will be to provide confident and competent access to the breadth and variety of German lyric poetry. We shall speak and write as much German as the class participants wish. Students will be evaluated by regular course participation, oral presentations, two in-class tests, and a short final paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 406. Conversation Practice.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a résumé and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities.

    The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This class is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this class.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 415. The German Language Past and Present.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rqueen/TEACHING/Ger415

    The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the assumptions, terminology, and methods of descriptive linguistics, historical linguistics and sociolinguistics and to apply these to a survey of the German language in both its current and past states. We will be concerned with the internal structure of the language; however, we will relate the internal structure to the cultural and social contexts in which the language has evolved and in which it is currently used.

    We will pay particular attention to the differences between spoken and written varieties of German as well as the relationships between standard German and the many German dialects and regional standards. The class is oriented around group discussion, lectures and presentations.

    Requirements include brief homework assignments and short essays, a midterm, a final term paper and an oral presentation of the final paper. Readings will be in German and English. No previous knowledge of linguistics is required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325/326. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    German 426 is devoted to enhancing the reading, speaking, writing, listening, translating, thinking, and arguing skills of advanced students. Our task this academic term will be to read a single edition of the influential German weekly Die Zeit, a newspaper that extensively covers and comments on foreign and domestic politics, economics, literature, visual arts, science, media, history, scholarship, and current topics of debate and contention. Students will take responsibility for a section of the newspaper (preparing vocabulary and background, brief presentations). Additional material will include relevant non-journalistic literature and competing coverage in papers to the left and the right of Die Zeit .

    Grades will be based on attendance/participation and homework assignments (translations, article summaries, brief position papers).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 430/Bus. Admin. 499. Doing Business in German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Vanvalkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 350, or one 300-level courses beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The goals of German 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre." This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgeably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

    This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgeably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

    This term, German 430 will also include a two-week unit on producing Power Point business presentations. This unit will be offered through the computer lab in the LRC.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 Sports and Culture in Advanced Industrial Democracies. Meets with Sociology 212.001

    Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

    Foriegn Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has attained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of this passing century.

    There can simply be no doubt that team sports as a form of mass culture have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Moreover, why did the United States deviate from the rest of the industrial world not in terms of the presence of such sports, but in their number and kind? Briefly put, why are baseball, football and basketball (as well as hockey to a certain extent) the hegemonic team sports that defined American mass culture throughout the 20th century, whereas no other industrial country has more than two such hegemonic team sports, most often indeed only one soccer. Why has this sports map remained so stable throughout a highly volatile and ever-changing century? Will this stability persist into the new millennium or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural space?

    In answering these questions, the course will proceed in the following manner: In the first section, we will look at the phenomenon ubiquitous to all advanced industrial societies where disorganized contests, competitions and games mutated into what we have come to know as modern team sports. In this segment, we will see how this transformation was identical in every industrial society and should thus be seen as a fine gauge of modernity: These disorganized games become bureaucratized, ordered, codified, rule-bound by the elites and upper middle class segments of industrial societies between 1860 and 1900. However, these games, though now codified and routinized, still remain part of leisure activities of a small privileged group in society. Once, however, they become embraced by the male, industrial working class, they enter the realm of professionalism, of vocation, of commodification. The industrial working class is the subject that leads these amateur games towards professional sports and thus to an integral part of modern mass culture.

    In the second part, we will look at how similar and congruous the development in the United States was with this trajectory, yet how the content emerged so differently. We will dwell briefly on what makes the United States similar and what renders it different vis-à-vis other advanced industrial democracies.

    The third segment will look in detail at the four North American culturally hegemonic team sports: baseball, football, basketball in the United States; ice hockey in Canada.

    The fourth part will analyze the development of soccer tellingly called "football" by the rest of the world in England.

    The last section will look at the world in the context of globalization and ask whether new structures might be emerging that will challenge the old; or whether these new developments will exist alongside the old in a much less significant and culturally powerful manner.

    Course Requirements: Two five-page papers on the course readings during the term; and a take-home final at the end of the course during the examination period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

    Section 001 KAFKA AND THE QUESTION OF AUTHORITARIAN RULE

    Instructor(s): Hubert Rast

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar concentrates on late nineteenth and early twentieth century German texts that theorize political, cultural, paternal, linguistic authority. We will analyze and compare the literary, intellectual and ethical predicaments that arise when particular conditions, settings, figures and patterns are privileged. In particular, we will look into: 1) the conflicts between the individual and the totalitarian, 2) the aesthetics of conflict, 3) the relationship between literature and politics. We will read works by Franz Kafka, Robert Musil, Heinrich and Thomas Mann and Ernst Jünger. Course requirements: One or two in-class presentations; one short paper, and a term paper of about 15 pages to be written and revised during the second half of the term. The language of instruction will be German. The students' use of German for both classroom and paper is optional.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 458. German Literature after 1945.

    Section 001 CONTEMPORARY MINORITY WRITERS

    Instructor(s): Julia C Hell

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course explores the topic of minority cultures in contemporary Germany. In particular, we will focus on fictional and non-fictional texts by Turkish-German (Emine Sevgi Özdamer, Aysel Özakin, Zafer Senocak, Feridun Zaimoglu) and Romanian-German authors (Herta Müller, Richard Wagner). Fringe Voices: An Anthology of Minority Writing in the Federal Republic of Germany (eds. Antje Harnisch and Friedemann Weidauer) will provide us with some of the material in English; other texts will be read in German. These readings will be complemented by articles on issues such as exile/diaspora, hybridity, and the concept of minority culture itself.

    Students will be asked to contribute presentations dealing with the assigned readings on a regular basis; in addition, students will write 3 shorter essays on assigned topics in German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Hubert Rast

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

    Section 001 The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements. Meets with Sociology 495.007 and Political Science 489.004.

    Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will analyze a very particular form of political participation, namely the social and historical aspects of fascism and right-wing movements. What is fascism? When does it arise? Who are its supporters? Who are its beneficiaries? What is its relationship to established political institutions? Above all, what is its relationship to that ubiquitous and fascinating social process known as "modernization"? Was it a unique phenomenon "in its own time and place" (i.e., the Europe of the 1920s and 1930s) or does it continue to exist albeit bearing different names and altered disguises?

    The course is divided into two sections. The first section will illuminate certain key aspects of fascism and right-wing movements in a general comparative framework. The emphasis will be on concepts and analyses rather than descriptions and events per se. Still, this section of the course will be deeply anchored in history and empirical reality. We will mainly, though not exclusively, use Germany as our empirical case during this first segment of the course.

    The second section will concentrate on a few countries other than Germany, so that we can compare and contrast realities of fascism which we discussed in the first, conceptual part of the course with the help of added examples. The countries discussed will be Austria, Spain, Italy, Romania, Hungary, Argentina, Japan, and Russia. We will end the course with a discussion of the New Right forms of contemporary right-wing politics so that we can have a fine temporal comparison with the original fascism fifty years later and thus answer the question better as to whether fascism was something unique in its time or rather a larger and more lasting phenomenon of political rule.

    Course requirements: There will be an in-class midterm examination. In addition, there will also be a final paper which will be due on the last day of our class meeting. The paper should be double-spaced, typed and not exceed twenty (20) pages. It should be on a topic which involves the concepts and materials used in the course. The exact topic will have to be approved by the instructor.

    All books used in this course will be available at the bookstore and will also be placed on reserve in the library.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Graduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


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