Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Great Books

This page was created at 7:15 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Great Books
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for GTBOOKS

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Great Books.


GTBOOKS 192. Great Books.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): H Don Cameron (hdcamero@umich.edu), Ralph G Williams

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors first-year students only. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of Great Books 191, from Plato to the Renaissance. We will read Plato, Symposium and Republic; Vergil, The Aeneid; selections from the Old Testament and New Testament; St. Augustine, Confessions; Dante, The Divine Comedy, (Inferno, and selections from Purgatorio and Paradiso); and selections from Boccaccio. Great Books 192 is open only to first-year students in the Honors Program; other students wishing to take a similar course are encouraged to elect Great Books 202.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GTBOOKS 202. Great Books of the Medieval and Modern World.

Section 001 Journeys of the Flesh and Spirit

Instructor(s): Robert D Wallin (rdwallin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will read, discuss, and write about some nine or so of the classics of Western literature. Written for the most part for audiences with backgrounds and expectations widely different from our own, these books have preserved their value and importance with ease. Because they force us to consider important questions and values, because they make us think about the kinds of persons we are or want to be, these books are as much our heritage as are the rules of arithmetic. I want you to become comfortable reading these books and eager to use them in forming your own education.

After focusing for about three weeks on Vergil's Aeneid and in the Christian New Testament (particularly on the Gospel of Mark and two or three of the Letters of Paul), we will read Saint Augustine's Confessions, Gottfried's Tristan, Dante's The Divine Comedy, Inferno, Machiavelli's The Prince, More's Utopia, Shakespeare's King Lear, and Rousseau's Confessions. Our conversation about and with these greats will include about ten pages of writing in a few shortish papers, two midterms, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GTBOOKS 222/Asian Studies 222/Japanese 222. Great Books of Japan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen (qmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the great works of literature that have exerted a determining influence on the lives and culture of the Japanese from ancient times to the present. Readings include selections from women's writing, from Lady Murasaki's monumental eleventh-century novel, The Tale of Genji, to various stories about the female condition in the modern world; medieval Buddhist-inspired essays on the ethos and aesthetics of daily life; a fascinating tract on death, heroism, and the way of the samurai; popular group poetry from renga, haikai, and Bashô's haiku; and modern fiction from Sôseki, Ibuse, and Nobel-prize winners Kawabata and Ôe. Discussions will focus on the human and cultural values inscribed in the works, particularly as seen from a comparative East/West perspective and the problematics of Japanese modernity. Because all texts are in English translation, no knowledge of Japanese is required. Course work consists of brief written assignments and two longer papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GTBOOKS 320. Great Books on the Hopes and Fears of Modernity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul W Sunstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course debates whether the modern individual is self-determining, self-aware, compassionate and without comforting myths, or rather part of a lonely crowd, self-involved, without grand passion, and disenchanted. It considers this question, along with its political implications, through the study of Hobbes' Leviathan, Rousseau's Confessions, Tocqueville's Democracy in America, Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground, Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil, and Aristotle's Ethics.

The ideal of the self reliant individual emerges as part of a larger and now commonplace revolution in the understanding of man and society. The modern individual was conceived from the start as the unit of the new politics of popular sovereignty and the nation state. This course presents an overview of specifically modern thought as a kind of liberation movement writ large. The personal and the political were long ago interwoven in the larger, apparently "self-evident" vision of liberal democracy that inculcates "think for yourself". This course aims to articulate and evaluate what might be termed the unobserved bottom of the iceberg of contemporary values.

The aim is to see our world through the eyes of each author. Each author claims and, upon close reading, claims for good reasons to be right. But our modern authors are often critical, indeed brilliantly so, of one another, and so this course develops two frameworks to compare the merits of each work. It argues that specifically modern ideas have a history and direction, beginning with a foundation in Hobbes, and continuing with its progressive radicalization by Rousseau and then Nietzsche. Thus the course develops a comparative overview within a specifically modern framework, which implies that each succeeding thinker, and each succeeding generation influenced by these thinkers, becomes more deeply immersed inside a self-perpetuating network of concepts. Finally, this course also attains critical distance on the above authors, who are fervently anti-Christian but often secularizers of Christianity, by contrast with perhaps the most lasting common sensical alternative of pre-modern and pre-Christian thought, Aristotle's Ethics.

Two eight page papers in the form of explications du texte, a final take home exam and participation in discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for GTBOOKS.


Page


This page was created at 7:15 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.