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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History

This page was created at 7:16 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in History
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTORY

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for History.


HISTORY 111. Modern Europe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Ann Field (debfield@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 110 is recommended as prerequisite. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/history/111/001.nsf

This course provides an introduction to European history from the Enlightenment to the present. We will examine the social and political changes brought about by war, revolution, and industrialization, and we will discuss the ways in which historical actors themselves interpreted these transformations. The course will emphasize the diversity of European society, paying particular attention to the categories of class and gender. We will focus on historical methodology by reading and discussing primary sources and by considering how scholars use historical evidence to build their arguments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 122/Asian Studies 122. Modern East Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie B Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu), Henry Em (henryem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/history/122/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to modern China, Korea, and Japan from 1800 to the present. It covers the following topics: (1) China's progressive decline and rejuvenation, the impact of imperialism, the rise and development of the People's Republic; (2) the struggles of Korea, its colonization by Japan, liberation, division into two Koreas, and the rising economic status of the South; and (3) the end of feudalism in Japan, the building of a modern state and economy, Japanese imperialism, postwar recovery, and rise to super-power status. Taking a broad comparative perspective on East Asia, the course explores the interrelations between political economy, society, and culture in each country within an emerging modern world system. This is a continuation of Asian Studies 121; however, that course is not a prerequisite and no previous background on the subject is required. Two lectures and one discussion section each week. A midterm and a final.

Required Reading:

  • Schirokauer, Conrad. Modern China and Japan: A Brief History. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, c1982. ISBN: 0155598708 (pbk.) ($47.50)
  • Kim, Richard E. Lost Names: Scenes from a Korean Boyhood Berkeley: University of California Press, [1998], c1988. ISBN: 0520214242 (pbk.) ($12.55)
  • Seybolt, Peter J. Throwing the Emperor from His Horse: Portrait of a Village Leader in China, 1923-1995. (Westview Press, 1996) ISBN: 0813331315 (pbk.) ($23.00)

    Purchase these in Textbooks Section of Shaman Drum, 311-315 South State Street, Tel: (734) 662-7407. You can order textbooks online at: www.shamandrum.com and pick them up on the first floor thus avoiding the long lines.

    The course packs required for this course are:

  • Modern East Asia: History 122 (course pack #1): at Accu-copy, 518 E. William Street, Tel: (734) 769-8338 ($33.25)
  • Modern East Asia: History 122 (course pack #2): also at Accu-copy, 518 E. William Street, Tel: (734) 769-8338

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

    HISTORY 160. United States to 1865.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Julius S Scott III (jsscott@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A survey of early American history from the period of initial colonization through the Civil War. The course will be organized around the interactions of the three dominant cultures which came together in early America: Native American, European, and African. We will explore the internal dynamics of each culture (family life, religious beliefs, political system, labor arrangements, gender roles) and how the clash of cultures shaped the experience of Americans in the colonial and national periods. Specific topics will include the problems of forming communities in an alien environment, the transition to slave labor and the origins of an African- American society, the American Revolution and the creation of the republic, the emergence of sectionalism, and the impact of early industrialism. Students will attend two lectures each week, and read a series of monographs and primary documents. A short paper and a final exam are required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Matthew D Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mlassite/history161.html

    History 161 surveys the lives and experiences of Americans after 1850. Through a combination of lectures, books, class presentations, and other sources students will explore the development of the nation's political economy. As a result, we will take a close look at the ways in which leaders and average citizens directed the nation during the last 150 years. Chronologically the course spans from the 1850s through the 1990s. Thematically, we will examine the Civil War and its causes, post-emancipation, the expansion of industrial America, immigration and migration, the World Wars, social protest, Cold War policy, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, and the enduring tension between consent and dissent. More than most survey courses, students will take an active role in the course and its presentations.

    Evaluation: Students are expected to complete all assigned readings, films, and projects in advance of discussion section. Any material covered in the course reading assignments, films/documentaries, lectures is fair game for the final exam. Lecture meetings and discussions will complement, not duplicate, one another. Finally, please note that each aspect of the course requirements must be completed in order to receive a passing grade in the course. The determination of final grades will be as follows:

    • Active participation and consistent attendance in discussion section (30%)
    • A 4-5 page mid-term essay assignment, completed outside of class (20%)
    • A 6-8 page research paper, based on primary and secondary sources (25%)
    • Two-part, in-class final exam, with term identification and essay components (25%)

    Required Books: the following books are available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookstore (313 S. State Street), and one copy of each is on reserve in Shapiro Undergraduate Library.

    • Retrieving the American Past, custom publication
    • John Mack Faragher, et. al, Out of Many, Vol. II, Brief Third Ed.
    • F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby
    • Eric Foner, The Story of American Freedom
    • William Finnegan, Cold New World

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

    Section 001 Epidemics: Deadly Disease in American History

    Instructor(s): Martin Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

    First-Year Seminar

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    From smallpox to AIDS, dramatic disease outbreaks both shaped and were shaped by American culture. This course explores how medicine and culture intersected to influence the causes, experiences of, and responses to epidemics in America; and it uses epidemics to illuminate the history of American society from colonization to the present. Lectures introduce new topics and summarize discussions. Discussions will explore past perceptions and compare past and present; we will not discuss the present apart from the past. Readings (4 to 5 hours weekly) include modern histories, plus old newspapers, films, and medical journals. Written assignments are two five-page book review papers, a short weekly journal, and an individual research project with parts due throughout the term. They will introduce you to the medical, graduate, and undergraduate libraries. Readings available only for purchase cost about $30; other required readings available on reserve or for purchase cost about $130 more.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

    Section 001 VICTORIAN CULTURE.

    Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

    First-Year Seminar

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is a first-year seminar intended to allow students to explore the history and representation of women in Victorian Britain (1836-1901). The course will use historical scholarship, life-stories, visual images, and literary works novels, short poems, plays, and non fiction prose to examine changes and continuities in the real and imagined lives of real and imagined women, and to look at the intersections and mutual effects of material conditions and cultural ideas. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which "Victorian women" are divided and differentiated, especially by class, but also by "race", religion, ethnicity and region, generation, and politics. Among topics to be explored are: the sources, growth, and ramifications of organized feminism in the 19th century; the legal and economic relations of marriage; women's and girls' education; women as writers and artists; the ideology of domesticity and family life; single women; medical and scientific ideas about gendered bodies; discourses of sex and sexuality; women and cities; sisters and brothers; working-class women's paid and unpaid work and politics; and gender and imperialism. The focus of the class will be on close reading and discussion. One central goal will be to expand students' repertoire of ways of reading and their abilities to identify questions, and contradictions, as well as arguments and themes, in both Victorian and contemporary writings. This class is especially suitable for students interested in history, literature, art history, and women's studies.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

    Section 002 Vienna, Berlin, and Paris: 1890-1930

    Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

    First-Year Seminar

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    When, where, and how does our age begin? Before Vienna the unconscious was an object of wonder; before Berlin the cinema was a charming toy; before Paris music and art made sense. Within the orbits of these great cities, before, during, and after World War I, our world was created at the hands of extraordinary men and women. This seminar explores the literature, art, music, cinema, the culture of an age in a flurry of creation and destruction, using the similarities and differences of the cities as center. Students will work on projects of their own choosing: some examples from the past have included the self-portraits of Picasso, the war in the air, Hollywood as an outpost of Europe, women's work in wartime, sports photography as a social indicator, there are many possibilities.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 201. Rome.

    Section 001 The Roman Empire and its Legacy.

    Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A survey of Roman history from the consolidation of the Roman empire in the second century B.C. to the rise of its political heirs in the Mediterranean world in the eighth century A.D. Topics to be discussed include Rome's overseas expansion; the administration of a large empire; the impact of Christianity; the conversion of Constantine; heresy and the imposition of orthodoxy; barbarian kingdoms; Justinian's reconquest; the rise of Islam; and the coronation of Charlemagne as a revived Roman emperor.

    Readings will include many ancient texts in translation and some modern scholarship. Final grade is based on two tests, frequent written exercises, and participation in discussions. No prerequisites; everyone welcome.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 211/MEMS 211. Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    R&E

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will investigate the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the opening of the second millennium through the fourteenth century. Some important themes will be the nature of kingship and representative institutions; patterns of urban, economic, and demographic growth; and movements in religious and intellectual life. Extensive readings from contemporary documents (chronicles, romances, poetry, sermons, etc.), a midterm, a final examination, and two short papers are required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

    HISTORY 213/MEMS 213. The Reformation.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This lecture course will introduce students to the Reformation, a Christian movement that reshaped Europe and the New World. Martin Luther's challenge to Catholic belief and practice unleashed a revolutionary dynamic that moved beyond religious questions to transform the social, political, and intellectual landscape of the West at the very moment of European state-building and colonial expansion. We will first place the work of Luther in the medieval German context from which it arose. We will then move on to consider the ways in which Reformation ideas and attitudes changed both Christianity and the world.

    Texts:

    John Dillenberger, ed., Martin Luther: Selections from His Writings, New York: Doubleday 1962

    Eugene F. Rice, Jr., The Foundations of Early Modern Europe, 1460-1559, New York: Norton 1999

    Steven Ozment, The Age of Reform 1250-1550: An Intellectual and Religious History of Late Medieval and Reformation Europe, New Haven: Yale UP 1980

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 218. The Vietnam War, 1945-1975.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): David R Smith (davidsm@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~davidsm/hst218w01/

    This course will explore the origins of colonialism and the rise of the Cold War to understand the political, economic, and military conflicts that contributed to the outbreak of war in Vietnam after 1945. While a main focus of this course will be on the involvement of the United States in the war, the course also will portray a broader international perspective of this conflict. With several decades of massive economic, political, and military turmoil, it must be recognized that the Vietnam War brought an overwhelming amount of human tragedy and displacement. Accordingly, this course will attempt to both understand the policy decisions that led to war in Vietnam and, importantly, put a human face on the war both for those from Vietnam (and surrounding nations) and those from the United States. Required readings for the course may be purchased at Shaman Drum Bookshop, 313 S. State:

    • George D. Moss, Vietnam: An American Ordeal, 3d ed. (Prentice Hall, 1994)
    • William J. Duiker, Sacred War: Nationalism and Revolution in a Divided Vietnam (McGraw Hill, 1995)
    • Christian G. Appy, Working-Class War: American Combat Soldiers & Vietnam (Univ. of North Carolina Press, 1993)
    • Marvin E. Gettleman, et al, ed., Vietnam and America: A Documented History (Grove Press, 1995)
    • Bao Ninh, The Sorrow of War: A Novel of North Vietnam (Riverhead Books, 1996)
    • Bobbie Ann Mason, In Country: A Novel (Harper & Row, 1985)
    • Course pack (available at Dollar Bill's, 611 Church St.)

    All graded work required in this course will consist of written compositions. In addition to two exams, students will be required to write a short (7-8 pages) paper. Class attendance and informed participation also are required, and will be considered when figuring final marks.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 225. Europe and the New World.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): A Michael Wintroub (wintroub@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

    R&E

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The first European observers of America saw a world populated alternatively by savages or by angels, they saw peoples apparently without laws, religion, rulers, or indeed clothes. Yet much of what they saw was conditioned by what they expected to see. This course will set out to explore the social and intellectual world(s) of those who first came to the Americas. It will follow these explorers, conquerors, and chroniclers on their journeys from the Old World to the New, and will analyze not simply their impact on the New World, e.g., "the narrative of the conquest" but how the experience of this New World interacted with and fundamentally changed the way Europeans thought about themselves and the universe(s) they inhabited.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 255. Gandhi's India.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswamy (sumathi@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History 151 recommended. (4). (Excl).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This survey course on 20th-century India explores the rich and complicated history of the subcontinent in the past hundred years through the eyes of two of its most well-known spokesmen, "Mahatma" Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru. The bulk of the course focuses on Gandhi whose many writings we will read to understand his political philosophy (with a special focus on civil disobedience and non-violence), his critique of scientific modernity, his attitude towards his own body, and his views on women. In addition, we will consider the end of British rule in India, the successes and failures of Indian nationalism, the establishment of independent nation-states in the region, and post-colonial developments, especially the rise of religious fundamentalism. The aim of the course is to understand the extent to which the "India" of Gandhi's century is a product of both its precolonial past, as well as of the modern global processes of colonialism, capitalism, and nationalism.

    IT IS NOT NECESSARY FOR STUDENTS TO HAVE ALREADY TAKEN HISTORY 151.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 265. A History of the University of Michigan.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu), Margaret L Steneck

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The University of Michigan has been a leader in shaping the modern American university. This course examines the University's history from the perspective of students, faculty, fields of study, administration, and alumni. It will also explore the factors that have shaped the University and place it within its larger social, political, national, and international contexts. The primary prerequisite is an interest in your University and its place in history.

    Lectures are accompanied by extensive slide presentations and a few movies. Readings include a course pack and textbook. Grading is based on essay/ objective exams; two short papers or a term project; and a campus tour photo quiz to acquaint students with central campus, its architecture and embellishments. Two of the five discussion sections (taught by the course instructors) are limited to upper-class enrollment only and will encourage UM-related projects.

    Books, available at the bookstores; some used copies may be available:
    Ruth Bordin, Women at Michigan: The "Dangerous Experiment," 1870s to the Present. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 1999.
    Jerry Harju, The Class of '57. Marquette, MI: Lake Superior Press, 1997.
    Howard Peckham, The Making of the University of Michigan, edited and updated by Margaret L. and Nicholas H. Steneck. Ann Arbor, MI: Bentley Historical Library, 1994.

    Coursepacks, available at Ulrich's Bookstore:
    M.L. & N.H. Steneck, Campus Practicum, 2001 Edition. (Available after February 19)
    History 265 Coursepack. Winter 2001 edition.

    *Two copies of Peckham, Bordin, Harju and the Campus Practicum are on UGLI reserve.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 284. Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year students must obtain permission of the instructor. (3). (SS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, health problems have both affected and reflected the evolution of modern society. The course will study four different historical periods, exploring such issues as: the effects of individual habits, environmental conditions, and medical innovation on public health; the role of ethics, economics, and politics in medical decision making; the changing health problems of the disadvantaged, including Native Americans, women, Blacks, immigrants, and workers; the changing meaning of concepts like "health," "disease," "cause," and "cure"; the dissemination and impact of medical discoveries; and the changing organization and power of the healing professions. We will focus on American history, although comparisons will be drawn to other societies. The course is a basic introduction, however, first-year students must obtain permission of the professor to enroll. Classes are taught in lecture format, and will include a variety of audio-visual sources. Reading assignments will range from modern histories to poetry and old medical journals. There will be two essay-style examinations, and frequent short quizzes. This is a challenging and demanding course. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course. Required purchases cost $15, but additional required reading assignments, available on reserve or for optional purchase, cost up to $110 additional if bought.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 287/Armenian 287. Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gerard Libaridian

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course explores the role of dynastic families and the nobility as well as intellectual elites and the Church in the rise and fall of different forms of Armenian statehood, from ancient and medieval kingdoms to the republics in the twentieth century. The course will cover successive political and economic systems throughout Armenian history, the debates on foreign policy choices and their relationship to political elites and the Armenian Diaspora.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 301. Discovery of the Universe.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    How did we get here? What's going on? Where are we going with this? These questions define the physical sciences, and this course examines the history of the ways and means, human, observational, experimental, and theoretical, that astronomers and physicists have used to answer them. The course begins with what has been called the "Scientific Revolution," with Galileo and the Inquisition, but quite rapidly we come to the nineteenth century, and the heart of the course is on the development of our study of the universe, its origin, structure, and future, during the last few generations. Among topics we shall consider are the financing of science, the politics and security implications of modern research,history of computers, the roles of women, the geographical and cultural spread of research, popularization and demonization of science, pseudo-science, and the various contexts of science, in addition to the development of research and thought. So this is a history, and not a science, course, although many of the readings will come from scientists themselves, and our discussions will be centered on the human history rather than on the science itself.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

    Section 001 Outside the Lines: Explorations in Interdisciplinarity Introducing Historical Anthropology. Meets with RC Social Science 360.004 and Anthropology 298.001.

    Instructor(s): David W Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/rcssci/360/004.nsf

    See RC Social Science 360.004.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 306/ACABS 321/Rel. 358. Israel Before the Exile (587 BCE): Its History & Religion.

    Sections 002-004 satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

    Instructor(s): Brian B Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

    Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 321.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 319. Europe Since 1945.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Geoffrey H Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The aim of this course is to provide a comprehensive critical introduction to European society, culture, and politics since the Second World War. Lectures and readings will cover both Eastern and Western Europe, the international arena and the national histories of particular countries, and social and cultural life as well as political developments. The course aims to explore the shaping of the contemporary world and to introduce students to societies and political cultures which are both structurally similar and fundamentally different from their own. Instruction will be via lectures and ad hoc discussion, evaluation via midterm exam and end-of-term essay. No special background is required; prejudices and preconceptions about European societies are enough.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    HISTORY 321. Postwar Britain.

    British History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 221 is recommended. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will examine Britain from the Great Depression, through World War II, the Cold War, the social and political challenges of the 1960s, the Conservative resurgence of the late 1970s, the Falklands war, and the fall of Margaret Thatcher. Special attention will be paid to the experience of war by civilian populations; the development of a "welfare state" and subsequent challenges thereto; Britain's decline as a world power; protest movements; the nuclear disarmament and peace movements from the late 50s/early 60s through the 80s; the influence of American culture on Britain; decolonization and the participation of Asians and Africans in British culture and politics; Welsh and Scottish nationalism; the Northern Ireland question; and on-going political and cultural debates about class, education, the media, sexuality and gender roles, and Britain as a multi-cultural society.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

    HISTORY 322/German 322. The Origins of Nazism.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu), S. Spector (spec@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

    R&E

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/history/322/001.nsf

    This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi- layered approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. First exploring the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic in which the Nazis rose to power, we will then analyze the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will also examine the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims of the regime. Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only historical texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

    Our course historicizes the rise of the Nazis in the First World War and the Weimar Republic and spends almost half of the course analyzing the history and popular culture (film, theater, literature) of the 1920s. The second half deals with the internal structures (forms of state, governance, welfare; the replacement of civil society through racial community; the manifestations and extent of consent and resistance) as well as the ways in which popular culture underpinned consent and resistance during the Third Reich.

    The persecution of the Jews is a consistent theme of the course in both halves, along with analysis of how notions of race divided the German population into the categories of "racially fit" and "unfit." BUT our examination of race is contex- tualized very differently than in Prof. Endelman's Holocaust course, for example. For that reason there is virtually no overlap in our reading lists (and we paid close attention to this ourselves last time).

    Midterm, final exam, one 10-12 page paper that draws upon at least one book that is not required for the course (a bibliography and list of suggested topics will be provided in the second or third week of the term). Upper-level undergraduates. Anton Kaes/Martin Jay/Edward Dimendberg, The Weimar Republic Sourcebook(University of California Press, 1994) David Crew, ed., Nazism and German Society 1933-45 (Routledge, 1994) Marion A. Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair: Jewish Life in Nazi Germany (Oxford University Press, 1998) Benjamin Sax & Dieter Kuntz, Inside Hitler's Germany: A Documentary History of Life in the Third Reich (Heath Sources in Modern History series, 1992) Michael Burleigh and Wolfgang Wippermann, The Racial State: Germany 1933-45 (Cambridge University Press, 1991) Out of stock is: Detlef Peukert, THE WEIMAR REPUBLIC: A CRISIS of CLASSICAL MODERNITY We are replacing it with Paul Bookbinder, WEIMAR GERMANY: THE REPUBLIC OF THE REASONABLE (Manchester/NY, 1996)

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 333/REES 396/Poli. Sci. 396/Slavic 396/Soc. 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/rees/396/001.nsf

    See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 396.001.

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    HISTORY 355/AAS 355. Health and Illness in African Worlds.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 200 recommended. (4). (Excl).

    R&E

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will consider health and illness, medicine and disease in diverse African worlds from the fifteenth century to the present. Designed equally for majors in History and Afroamerican and African Studies and students planning careers in the health professions in this country and abroad. No prior knowledge of Africa is assumed. Though historical in nature, the course will draw on the methodologies of medical anthropology, epidemiology, and medical sociology. It will propose health and wealth as a central theme to the history of Africans in diverse social and historical contexts, both on the African continent and in the larger Black Atlantic world. The central question will be: what happened to these deeply rooted forms of moral logic and therapeutic practice as Africans encountered new forms of wealth, inequality, and disease and new medical and healing systems associated with slave trades, colonialisms, epidemics, famines, debt and theft from the fifteenth century to the present?

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    HISTORY 359. Visions of the Past.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Jonathan L Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course rests on the proposition that most of what most people have ever known about the past has come from deliberated aesthetic forms such as monuments, paintings, novels, and films. Many more Americans have read or seen Gone With the Wind than have ever read a history of the Civil War; films like Schindler's List have been the primary means by which Americans and Europeans have conceptualized the destruction of European Jewry. This course, therefore, will examine how and why history is represented in the various aesthetic forms, and how those representations have created our sense of what is important in history. We shall read a half dozen novels and plays, see several films, look at a variety of art and architecture, and listen to several musical forms. Classes will be lecture and discussion, and there will be one or two papers besides a midterm and final.

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    HISTORY 363. U.S. Foreign Policy and International Politics Since World War II.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Matthew J Connelly (mattconn@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course students will explore contemporary international history by reading the works of some leading scholars in the field and discussing why they differ. Classes will focus on the conflict and cooperation of the U.S. with other states in the Cold War, decolonization, and regional crises. But lectures will also analyze how non-state actors, cross-border migration, new means of communication, and global markets are transforming the international system as a whole.

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    HISTORY 367/Amer. Cult. 367. American Indian History.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Liza Black (lizab@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

    R&E

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See American Culture 367.001.

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    HISTORY 371/WS 371. Women in American History Since 1870.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

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    HISTORY 375/WS 375. A History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course focuses on a single historical event, the Salem witchcraft outbreak of 1692. It explores "what happened" during this highly dramatic episode in early American history, where the Salem story fits in the larger history of witchcraft in Europe and its American colonies, and why it continues to have such a powerful hold on the popular and scholarly imagination. Beginning with original trial records and other primary documents concerning witchcraft and religion in Europe and its American colonies, students will analyze a variety of sources, including scholarly accounts of the Salem events, recent films and other fictionalized versions of it, and images of witches and witchcraft in other segments of contemporary American culture. Among the central questions to be addressed in the course are why most accused witches in the European and Euro-American witchcraft traditions were women and why the witch figure continues to be repressed primarily as female in today's popular culture.

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    HISTORY 377/Amer. Cult. 315. History of Latinos in the U.S.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in History 312. (4). (Excl).

    R&E

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See American Culture 315.001.

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    HISTORY 378/Amer. Cult. 314. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/amcult/314/001.nsf

    See American Culture 314.001.

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    HISTORY 385. History of Zionism and the State of Israel.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course covers the rise of Jewish nationalism from its origins in the late- nineteenth century through the creation of the State of Israel in 1948 and the history of the Jewish state in the following half-century. Emphasis will be placed on the political context out of which Zionism developed and on the larger cultural trends that shaped the variety of ideologies within the Zionist movement. Significant time will also be devoted to examining the role of Zionist activity within the histories of major Jewish communities in the Diaspora prior to World War II and the competing ideologies and movements (socialism, strict orthodoxy, and assimilationism) that challenged the Zionist solution to the "Jewish Question." The tragic confrontation between Jews and Arabs within the Land of Israel will be explored in some depth, with particular attention being paid to the genesis of the confrontation. The last cluster of lectures will focus on the cultural, social, and political problems that have beset the State of Israel from its establishment in 1948 to the present and on the links between these and broader themes in modern Jewish history as a whole. There will be a midterm examination, a ten-page analytical paper, and a comprehensive final.

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    HISTORY 391. Topics in European History.

    Section 001 Histories of Art and Histories of Nations

    Instructor(s): T. Willette (willette@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will be conducted as a seminar on the historiography of nationalism in early modern and modern Europe. However, unlike most investigations of the topic, this seminar will consider how discourses of national history have been articulated through histories of art and through the organization of museums and picture galleries. From the 16th century to the 20th century, histories of nations and histories of art were often informed by the same philosophical premises and cultural attitudes regarding national character, language, physiognomy and political institutions, as well as similar assumptions about the determining roles of race, geography and climate. On the other hand, histories of art justify their claims about "Dutchness" or "Frenchness" or "Napolitanità" with a privileged kind of evidence for works of art, that is to say, highly crafted objects invested with labor, tradition and genius inhabit the realm of things, as durable witnesses to the past. However, such objects, whether paintings, jewelry, or churches, are witnesses only to what historical meaning can be given to them. Hence the double function of art history is to document the art of the past and to construct its (usually implicit) historical significance. The paintings of Albrecht Dürer, Annibale Carracci, Raphael, Vermeer and Rembrandt have at different times been regarded as embodiments of the essential national characteristics of their respective nations.

    The seminar will investigate the development of regional political identities in the 16th and 17th centuries, particularly in Italy and the Northern Netherlands, and the parallel definition of civic "schools" of art (for example, those of Amsterdam, Florence, Bologna and Naples). We will then consider how the growth of the modern nation state and the rise of national romanticism in the 19th century shifted the center of national identity from the city to the country as a whole, while new histories of art suppressed regional differences in order to devise a single canon of artists and historical works to represent the "national school" of a given country. Alongside this shift from civic nationalism to what has recently been called the "tribal nationalism" of modern times, we will track the idea of "national patrimony" as an object of patriotic sentiment, in histories of art and in national galleries of art, as well as in state-commissioned art such as national war monuments and tombs for great historical figures. As we shall see, national histories of art in the 19th and 20th centuries have been important sites for debating issues of national identity, whether that of the nation state, or that asserted more variously by local tradition and culture.

    Primary sources include visual art produced in Italy, Holland, Flanders, Germany and the United States, and readings from a range of influential texts, such as Vasari, Lives of the Artists (1568), Malvasia, Life of the Carracci (1678), Turnbull, A Treatise on Ancient Painting (1740), Winckelmann, Reflections on the Imitation of Greek Works (1755), Hegel, Introduction to the Philosophy of History (1822), Mazzini, Modern Italian Painters (1841), Taine, Lectures on Art (1864), Burckhardt, The Recollections of Rubens (1898), Riegl, The Dutch Group Portrait (1902), Wölfflin, Principles of Art History (1916), Schapiro, Race, Nationality and Art (1938), Belting, The Germans and Their Art (1998).

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    HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

    Section 001 Culture and Politics During the Civil War and Reconstruction. Meets with Women's Studies 342.001 and American Culture 301.004.

    Instructor(s): Hannah R Rosen (hrosen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Women's Studies 342.001.

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    HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

    Section 002 Science and Government in the U.S., 1776-2010.

    Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nsteneck/Courses/393/index.html

    The role of government in fostering and regulating scientific and technological development has undergone significant change over the course of US history. When the country was established, government support for research and development was in most ways antithetical to the political philosophy and values of the new, decentralized democracy. Today, research and development are recognized as "national interests" and therefore the subject of a wide range of government decisions, from funding, to research controls and development priorities. This course will explore the evolution of science and technology policy in the US from the signing of the Constitution to the present day.

    The class will meet weekly for three hours at the Ford Presidential Library, North Campus. Class meetings will be divided roughly half lecture, half discussion of readings and research projects. The first half of the term will focus pre-WW II developments, the second half on post-WW II developments. Students will have the opportunity to use the resources of the Ford Presidential Library for one short paper and their research paper. The major research project required in the course may be done in the Ford Presidential Library or use other libraries and resources, depending on their research focus.

    Texts:
    A Hunter Dupree, Science in the Federal Government: A History of Policies and Activities to 1940
    Bruce L.R. Smith, American Science Policy Since World War II (1990)
    Claude E. Barfield, Science Policy from Ford to Reagan: Change and Continuity (1982)
    Web readings (posted on the course Homepage)

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    HISTORY 395. Reading Course.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

    Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

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    HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

    Section 001 HISTORY OF AMERICAN SEXUALITIES

    Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Attitudes toward sexuality have permeated all aspects of American culture in profound ways. Slavery and racism, gender relations, family life, constructions of childhood and youth, metaphors of power in both the public and private realm, concepts of order and disorder, health and disease, politics, the nature of good and evil every aspect of American history can be accessed and understood better if read through the lens of the history of sexuality. This course will study sexual meanings, sexual behavior, systems of sexual regulation, and sexual politics throughout American history. By means of readings and discussion we will probe how and why dominant meanings of sexuality have changed over the last 400 years and attempt to better understand present dilemmas.

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    HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

    Section 002 Medieval Italian Cities.

    Instructor(s): Alan M Stahl (amstahl@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A survey of the development of urbanism and the history of specific cities in Italy from the end of the Roman Empire to the beginning of the Renaissance. In addition to general readings and discussions, each student will follow one city through the period, looking at the distinctive aspects of its development in such aspects as population, government, economy, and literary and artistic culture. Each student will prepare periodic oral and written reports on the individual city studied as well as a final term paper.

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    HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

    Section 003 Postwar Japan: History and Memory.

    Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Beginning with the surrender to Allied Forces in 1945, Japan was transformed from a country devastated by total war into an economic world power. This course explores the complex and often troubled path of that transformation through the medium of different forms of history ranging from autobiography and oral history to more conventional historical narratives. We will focus on key themes in Japan's postwar history the aftermath of war, the Occupation, Cold War diplomacy, high-growth economics, citizen movements, the "managed society," minority politics, consumer culture as they have been variously remembered and historicized. Students will be expected to prepare and discuss weekly reading assignments, write and revise several short papers during the course of the term, and complete one longer final paper. The history department will create a waitlist; do not attend the first class meeting unless the instructor has admitted you to the course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 2

    HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

    Section 004 FRONTIER AMERICA

    Instructor(s): David Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An examination of the major geographical discoveries relating to North America in the 18th century. Focuses on the decline of missionary endeavor, the reawakening of scientific curiosity, and the influence of the European Enlightenment on the course of American exploration and settlement. Topics include: international rivalries, land speculation, the Susquehanna and Ohio Valleys, the Canadian and Pacific Northwest, Daniel Boone, the California missions, Captain Cook, and Lewis & Clark.

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    HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

    Section 001 WORLD WAR II IN SOUTHEAST ASIA.

    Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrazek (rdlf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    There will be reading of scholarly accounts, novels, memoirs, and transcripts of trials; documentary and fiction movies will be watched and discussed. The theme will be power, war, and violence in Southeast Asia, during the Japanese Occupation, 1941-1945. Hopefully, we will learn something about colonialism, nationalism, and, more broadly, about the sense of order, peace, and freedom as they emerged from the war. Each student will be required to participate actively in the sessions, and, at the end, to present a research paper of about 15-20 pages.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

    Section 002 HISTORY AND HISTORIOGRAPHY OF NATIONALISM: A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE, AFRICA AND INDIA

    Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

    Section 003 CHRISTIAN AND PAGAN IN PREMODERN EUROPE.

    Instructor(s): Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course investigates the clashes and compromises between Christianity, which insisted on monotheism, and paganism, which divided supernatural power among a hierarchy of gods. Although Christianity had declared a formal victory over paganism by the fourth century, it was not final. Pagan practices endured, reinforced by the Germanic invasions and settlements of the early middle ages. Through a study of subjects such as religious ritual, the cult of the dead, hagiography, magic, and heresy, we will explore the tensions between the two belief systems and try to determine how Christian Europe was at the time of the Reformation. The course will be conducted as a colloquium, with discussion focussed on primary documents and recent scholarly interpretation of them. There will be two short papers and a longer research paper.

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    HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

    Section 004 AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 20TH CENTURY. Meets with American Culture 496.001

    Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will examine the collective efforts of African-Americans to overcome racial discrimination and legal segregation over the course of the 20th century. How were black protest movements organized? Why did they succeed or fail to achieve their goals? What caused them to disintegrate? Specifically, we will compare the role that ideological, strategic, and contextual factors played in the success or failure of movements. We will also examine how black social movements have made use of and generated African-American cultural practice. Finally, we will discuss how relations of race, class and gender both within American society and within the African-American community were reflected in these movements.

    The course will be conducted as a discussion seminar. Students will also be expected to keep a journal of responses to the course reading and will write research paper based on primary documents.

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    HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

    Section 005 American Music and Cultural Critique. Meets with American Culture 496.002.

    Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See American Culture 496.002.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

    Section 006 Lost in Cyberspace: Chapters in the History of the Book.

    Instructor(s): Oz Frankel (ofrankel@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar takes as its starting point the current hype over "New Media" and the collateral prophesies regarding the imminent death of the book, and proceeds to examine essential features of (and key episodes in) the history of the book, print and reading in modern Europe and the US. Since the invention of the printing press in the 15th century, books and print culture have been central to the shaping of western culture and society. Nevertheless, only recently have scholars begun to explore critically and historically this crucial facet of modern life.

    The seminar follows the role print and books had in the emergence of the modern "market place" and "public sphere," and, alternatively, their employment as tools of transformation during periods of social and political strife (for instance, the French Revolution). The material aspect of book production, their design as artifacts, and their dissemination will be also investigated. Case studies from both sides of the Atlantic will include the business of street pamphleteers in 18th century Paris, the reading practices of handbills and banknotes in 19th century NYC, and the 20th century "Book of the Month Club." Other themes under consideration will be the rise of authorship as a profession, the relationship between books and their readers, publishing and state authority, and the effects of Western based print culture on other lands. Finally, we will try to assess the durability and vulnerability of books, print and "information" in the virtual spaces of the new technologies of communication.

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    HISTORY 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

    Section 001 Junior Honors Colloquium on Methods of Historical Research

    Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students and junior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (Excl).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar is designed to prepare students to write an Honors thesis. As the first course in a three-semester sequence for History Honors concentrators, it will focus on the craft of historical research and writing, and will combine analysis of theoretical works on, and possible models for, the doing of history with practical nuts-and-bolts investigations of the tools necessary to define and produce a thesis. We will be especially attentive to thinking about how historians work: the ways in which topics are defined, primary sources identified and analyzed, and arguments fashioned. Because writing is critical to the process of making knowledge in history, the seminar will be writing-intensive (approximately 40 pages), and will include a variety of kinds of historical essays. By the conclusion of the course the participants will have chosen their research topics and thesis advisors and will have written a prospectus outlining their plan of research.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    HISTORY 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

    Section 002 Junior Honors Colloquium on Methods of Historical Research

    Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students and junior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (Excl).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar is designed to prepare students to write an Honors thesis. As the first course in a three-semester sequence for History Honors concentrators, it will focus on the craft of historical research and writing, and will combine analysis of theoretical works on, and possible models for, the doing of history with practical nuts-and-bolts investigations of the tools necessary to define and produce a thesis. We will be especially attentive to thinking about how historians work: the ways in which topics are defined, primary sources identified and analyzed, and arguments fashioned. Because writing is critical to the process of making knowledge in history, the seminar will be writing-intensive (approximately 40 pages), and will include a variety of kinds of historical essays. By the conclusion of the course the participants will have chosen their research topics and thesis advisors and will have written a prospectus outlining their plan of research.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    HISTORY 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

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    HISTORY 400. Problems in Greek History I.

    Section 001 The Reception of Ancient Greece

    Instructor(s): Beate D Dignas (bdignas@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The ancient Greeks what are they to us? So remote and so modern... This course offers an introduction to ancient Greece by looking at its reception and relevance in our own world. Modern examples taken from art, drama, film, literature, politics and everyday life will be examined carefully: Antigone and Medea in modern theatre productions, Oedipus in psychoanalysis, classical motifs in contemporary art, the works of Aphrodite and Platonic love, an oath of Hippocrates, Olympic games and democratic constitutions familiar and less familiar symbols and ideas that go back to ancient Greece. What is their precise origin, why have particular themes "survived" for 2,500 years, and how "real" is their meaning today? What made Greek myths and ideas so powerful that they inspired western civilization as a whole? How have our received ideas and images of ancient Greece colored our understanding of ancient evidence? Participants will observe and discuss how imitation and transformation, uncritical adulation as well as ideological rejection shaped and shape our views.

    Previous knowledge about ancient Greece is not required, everybody is welcome. Participants will be asked to participate in class discussions and prepare these thoroughly by reading the textbook and course pack material. There will be a midterm paper and a final exam.

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    HISTORY 409. Byzantine Empire, 867-1453.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A survey taking the Byzantine Empire from the accession of the Macedonians till the Empire's fall to the Ottomans. The course focuses on both internal political history and foreign affairs (relations with the West; the great Church split between Rome and Constantinople; relations with Crusaders and with Slavic neighbors Russians, Bulgarians, and Serbs, relations with the Seljuk and Ottoman Turks). The main texts are: Ostrogorsky's History of the Byzantine State, and Jenkins' Byzantium: The Imperial Centuries; and for the final two centuries, Nichol's The Last Centuries of Byzantium. Flexible requirements: Besides the final examination, various options exist: (1) a short paper and hour exam; (2) a longer paper and no hour exam.

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    HISTORY 412/MEMS 414. Social and Intellectual History of the Florentine Renaissance.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    How did a medieval city of bankers and cloth merchants become, in the fifteenth century, the center of an original humanist culture that offered Europeans new ways of seeing and portraying themselves and their society from artistic perspective to the writing of history? The course will trace the history of renaissance Florence not only as a chronicle of its development but also as the process by which it self-consciously constituted itself as a society and a history. Among the topics taken up will be the reshaping of the city, both physically and constitutionally; the transformation of the Medici from bankers to humanist rulers; the development of humanism into an enabling code for civil life; the new valuation of wealth and the civic use of magnificence (from palaces to wedding and funeral processions); social organization and changing attitudes toward the disempowered (slaves, Jews, the poor, women); and forms of religious expression, from confronternal devotions and processions to the fire and brimstone of prophetic preachers (e.g., Savonarola). Considerable use will be made of original sources (historical, literary, and visual). This is designed as a lecture course, but there will be ample time allotted for discussion.

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    HISTORY 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This is a lecture course which surveys the history of the modern Balkans the area which consists of the ex-Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania from roughly 1878 to the present. There are no prerequisites nor required background. Interested first-year students should feel welcome. Grading is based on: one hour exam, a one-hour written exam, writing on one essay question out of about four, one course paper (approximately 15 pages, topic according to student interest but cleared with instructor), and a written final exam (two essay questions to be chosen from a list of about eight questions). Major issues to be covered are: the crisis of 1875-78 with international involvement ending with the Treaty of Berlin, Croatia and Bosnia under the Habsburgs, the development of Bulgaria after 1878, the Macedonia problem, terrorist societies, World War I, the formation of Yugoslavia, nationality problems in Yugoslavia between the Wars, German penetration and the rise of dictatorships in the inter-war Balkans, World War II with Yugoslav and Greek resistance movements (including the Greek Civil War), Tito's Yugoslavia, its 1948 break with the USSR and Yugoslavia's special path to socialism. Nationality problems, the break-up of Yugoslavia, and the ensuing wars.

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    HISTORY 432. Medieval and Early Modern Russia.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Since medieval times, Westerners have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the end of the seventeenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, and the reign of Ivan the Terrible. The course emphasizes interpretive issues, historiographic debates and questions of historical method. Class sessions will combine lecture and discussion. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two short papers (5-7 pages), a midterm and a final exam. There are no prerequisites.

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    HISTORY 434. History of the Soviet Union.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Serhy Yekelchyk (serhy@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of fifteen independent republics, the experience of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe is being rethought as if the seeds of destruction had been planted already in the revolution. This course looks at the complex evolution of political structures, social developments, and cultural responses during the 70 years of the Soviet system. Beginning with the prerevolutionary crises and political movements, it surveys the rise of Stalin, the building of a "totalitarian" state, and the successive reforms that ultimately unraveled the system. Students are required to attend two lectures and one discussion section each week, prepare a term project, and take two take-home examinations (midterm and final).

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    HISTORY 438. Eastern Europe from 1500 to 1900.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Brian A Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will survey the history of Eastern Europe up to 1900, concentrating on the lands now included within Poland, Lithuania, Ukraine, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. We will explore the development and collapse of a political and social system marked by both unparalleled liberties for the nobility and crushing oppression for the peasantry. East European history has been shaped by the interactions of two great religions Christianity and Judaism and we will discover some of the rich diversity within each tradition. In this course we will see how the cultural and ethnic divisions of the region took shape over the centuries, and how the sometimes violent, sometimes creative force of nationalism assumed its modern form. By looking at a region which always sat precariously on the boundaries of that elusive concept called "Europe," we will critically examine the questions of economic and social underdevelopment which remain so important in our own day.

    Textbook List: Piotr Wandycz, The Price of Freedom: A History of East-Central Europe from the Middle Ages to the Present (New York: Routledge, 1993).

    Daniel Chirot, ed., The Origins of Backwardness in Eastern Europe: Economics and Politics from the Middle Ages Until the Early Twentieth Century (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989).

    Anthony Polonsky, ed., From Shtetl to Socialism (Oxford: The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization).

    Paula Sutter Fichtner, ed., The Habsburg Empire: From Dynasticism to Multinationalism (Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing Company, 1997).

    Krystyna Olszer, For Your Freedom and Ours: Polish Progressive Spirit from the 14th Century to the Present (New York: F. Ungar Publishing Company, 1981).

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    HISTORY 443/AAPTIS 487. Modern Middle East History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/syl443.htm

    This lecture course surveys the emergence of the modern Middle East from the three great Muslim empires of the early modern period, the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal. It discusses both indigenous developments and the Western impact in the nineteenth century, looking at reform bureaucracy and millenarian movements as responses to these changes. We then examine the rise of nationalism and the break-up of the Ottoman Empire during and after WW I, and these phenomena are seen as the context or the beginnings of the Palestine issue. Attention is paid to the interwar efforts at building strong states in the region, whether in the Turkey of Ataturk, the Iran of Reza Shah, or Wafdist Egypt. The last part of the course looks at the rise of socialist and pan-Arab ideologies, as well as of opposing ideologies such as Islamic activism after WW II. The impact of petroleum, the Palestinian issue, the turn toward bourgeois liberalism, and Shi'ite movements such as the Iranian Revolution and the Hizbullah phenomenon in Lebanon, and the Gulf War of 1991, will all be addressed in this section. Students will take a midterm and a final examination, and will write a ten-page term paper on a subject of their choosing. Reading in this course comes to about 150 pages per week.

    Required texts: (Available at Shaman Drum, 313 S. State St., tel. 662-7407, and at Reserve Reading Room, 3rd Floor, Shapiro Undergraduate Library):

  • Daniel, Elton L. The History of Iran. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 2000.
  • Kahlil Gibran. Broken Wings. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999.
  • Nageeb Mahfouz. Midaq Alley. Trans. Trevor LeGassick. New York: Anchor Books, 1992.
  • Afaf Lutfi al-Sayyid Marsot. A Short History of Modern Egypt. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1985.
  • Milton-Edwards, Beverley. Contemporary politics in the Middle East. Malden, MA : Blackwell Publishers, 2000.
  • Charles C. Smith. Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. St. Martin's, 3nd edition, 1997.
  • Erik J. Zurcher. Turkey: A Modern History. New York: I.B. Tauris/ St. Martin's, 1998.
  • A short course pack will be available at: Accucopy

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    HISTORY 448/AAS 448. Africa Since 1850.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 200 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E).

    R&E

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is a survey of modern African history. It covers particularly the colonial period and will include close looks at particular topics and reading and discussion of novels and original documents, as well as of historical scholarship. This format will allow for combinations of lecture and discussion during each session.

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    HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

    Section 001 MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIA II: 1942-2000.

    Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrazek (rdlf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The major themes of this course will be late-colonialism, nationalism, and modernization of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Burma) a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources. Individual students' interest in particular region will be fully supported.

    There will be a midterm examination and a final. In addition, each student will be required to write a research paper of about 15 pages on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. The paper's topic may focus on a single country or region, or it may be comparative; use of primary sources will be especially encouraged. The primary sources may include chronicles or codes of law, travel accounts, newspapers, government documents and reports, short stories, films, novels and/or poetry. There are ample translations available, thus a knowledge of regional languages is not required.

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    HISTORY 461. The American Revolution.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An intensive course on the background to the Revolution, its progress, and the changes it wrought in American life. Emphasis on America's mid-18th-century socioeconomic transformation, Britain's reorganization of her empire in the 1760s and 1770s, colonial opposition, and the emergence of a uniquely American ideology. Subsequent topics include the progress and disclocations of the military conflict, the attempt at confederation, and the culmination of the Revolutionary movement in the iteration and early development of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

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    HISTORY 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

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    HISTORY 467. The United States Since 1933.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Sidney Fine (sidneyf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The course provides a comprehensive view of American history and of life in America from the Great Depression to the present day. Among the subjects treated are the New Deal; World War II; the Cold War; McCarthy and McCarthyism; the Fair Deal; the New Frontier; the Great Society; the turbulence of the 1960's (the Black revolt and Black power, the counterculture and youth revolt, the new feminism and women's liberation); the war in Vietnam; Nixon and the Watergate affair; the 1980s and the Reagan presidency; and the presidencies of Bush and Clinton. Several paperbacks are assigned for the course, but no textbook is used. There is a midterm and a final examination in the course, and a paper is required.

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    HISTORY 477. Latin America: The National Period.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    R&E

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course examines the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century until the present. The approach is chronological and thematic. A temporal narrative will be organized around these themes: (1) state formation, including forms of political rule and the construction of collective identities at local, national, and continental levels; (2) elite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolution, and state repression; and (3) forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic development, and center-periphery linkages. The discussion of individual countries and of specific topics will be intertwined throughout the course. Classes will combine lecture and discussions. Students are required to read the assigned materials BEFORE each class and are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Written work will involve a short essay, a longer paper, a midterm, and a final. Readings will include relevant sections from a textbook, and articles, monographs, novels, short stories, newspapers and films, some of which will be selected in response to class discussion and students' interests.

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    HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

    Section 001 Race and Citizenship in Comparative Perspective: The United States and Cuba, 1865-1965

    Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu), Richard H Pildes

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar explores the relationship of law and society during a process of radical political and social transformation: the end of slavery and the redefining of the boundaries of race and citizenship. In the United States, male former slaves became full political participants for the brief period of Reconstruction, but massive retrenchment followed and by the early 20th century, African Americans had been virtually eliminated from Southern electoral politics. In Cuba, by contrast, shortly after slavery was abolished a large-scale cross-racial nationalist movement emerged whose legacy was a strong claim to citizenship by Afro-Cuban veterans, a claim that led to the incorporation of a guarantee of universal manhood suffrage in the Cuban Constitution of 1901. Thus at the same moment that black disfranchisement in much of the South was allowed to stand by the U.S. Supreme Court, cross-racial enfranchisement was written into the Cuban Constitution. The subsequent histories of voting and political participation in both societies were framed within this contrast, through the period of the Cuban revolution of 1959 and the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    In exploring these contrasting histories, we will read key legal cases, historical testimony, and secondary accounts, paying attention to the interplay of law, electoral politics, and other forms of collective action. The seminar will meet once a week for two hours, and will be open to law students, advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Professor Scott is a faculty member in the Department of History and a specialist on post-emancipation societies in Latin America and the United States; Professor Pildes is a faculty member in the Law School and a specialist on race, law and electoral systems. Law students will receive 2 credits for this seminar; LSA undergraduates will participate in an extra one-hour discussion section and will receive 3 credits. Admission is by permission of the instructor, via email to rjscott@umich.edu.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

    Section 001 The Caucasus Since the Fall of the Soviet Union.

    Instructor(s): Gerard Libaridian

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will explore the challenges Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia have faced since becoming independent states a decade ago, as individual countries and as a region. The lectures and readings will cover the course these republics have charted for their political and economic transformation, the conflicts (Nagorno Karabagh, Abkhazia, South Ossetia) that have marred their development, their difficult relations with their stronger neighbors (Russia, Turkey, Iran), their path of integration in the international community, as well as the relationship between their domestic politics and their foreign and security policies.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 491/Econ. 491. The History of the American Economy.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 or 102. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/econ/491/001.nsf

    See Economics 491.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

    Section 001 Lost in Cyberspace: Chapters in the History of the Book.

    Instructor(s): Oz Frankel (ofrankel@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar takes as its starting point the current hype over "New Media" and the collateral prophesies regarding the imminent death of the book, and proceeds to examine essential features of (and key episodes in) the history of the book, print and reading in modern Europe and the US. Since the invention of the printing press in the 15th century, books and print culture have been central to the shaping of western culture and society. Nevertheless, only recently have scholars begun to explore critically and historically this crucial facet of modern life.

    The seminar follows the role print and books had in the emergence of the modern "market place" and "public sphere," and, alternatively, their employment as tools of transformation during periods of social and political strife (for instance, the French Revolution). The material aspect of book production, their design as artifacts, and their dissemination will be also investigated. Case studies from both sides of the Atlantic will include the business of street pamphleteers in 18th century Paris, the reading practices of handbills and banknotes in 19th century NYC, and the 20th century "Book of the Month Club." Other themes under consideration will be the rise of authorship as a profession, the relationship between books and their readers, publishing and state authority, and the effects of Western based print culture on other lands. Finally, we will try to assess the durability and vulnerability of books, print and "information" in the virtual spaces of the new technologies of communication.

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    HISTORY 517. History of Ireland Since 1603.

    British History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Benjamin Zvi Novick

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A narrative history of modern Ireland from the time of the collapse of Gaelic culture at the Tudor conquest until the present. Lectures will treat aspects of economic, cultural, and social as well as political history. Course work will include a sequence of periodic brief quizzes, one term paper, a final examination. There is no course prerequisite and no prior knowledge of Ireland is required.

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    HISTORY 523. France, 1661-1789.

    Section 001 The Old Regime and Enlightenment.

    Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/history/523/001.nsf

    Through readings in both seventeenth- and eighteenth-century texts, as well as recent historical works, this course examines the French Enlightenment in its relationship to the political culture of France, from the accession of Louis XIV to (but not including) the French Revolution. The format of the course combines formal lectures with substantial discussion of primary texts. Primary source readings include the theorist of absolutism, Bossuet, aristocratic writers Saint-Simon and Sévigné, and Enlightenment figures Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Graffigny, Mercier, and Raynal.

    Questions we will explore include:

    • How was the Enlightenment situated in relation to the broader culture and institutions of Old Regime France?

    • What were the objects and shape of Enlightenment critique? How did the Enlightenment respond to the political culture and questions of its day?

    • Who participated in the Enlightenment and what were the social and intellectual practices in which they engaged?

    • What roles did women play in the Old Regime and Enlightenment? How were issues of gender addressed?

    Texts Available at Shaman Drum, course pack available at Dollar Bill. Book List: Title: The Ancient Regime Author: Behrens ISBN: 0-393-95801-9 Publisher: Norton Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: Title: Panorama of Paris Author: Mercier ISBN: 0-271-01931-X Publisher: Penn State Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: Title: Persian Letters Author: Montesquieu ISBN: 0872204901 Publisher: Hackett Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: Title: Letters concerning the English Nation Author: Voltaire ISBN: 0192837087 Publisher: Oxford World Classics Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: Title: Letters from a Peruvian Woman Author: Graffigny ISBN: 0-87352-778-X Publisher: MLA Texts & Translations Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: English translation! Title: Discourse on Inequality Author: Rousseau ISBN: 0-19-282947-5 Publisher: Oxford World Classics Required: required Title: Private Lives and Public Affairs Author: Maza, Sarah Publisher: University of California Press Required: required

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 535/Armenian 535. Armenia and the Armenians in the 20th Century.

    Section 001 The South Caucasus Since the Collapse of the USSR

    Instructor(s): Gerard Libaridian

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 287 recommended but not required. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will explore the challenges Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia have faced since becoming independent states a decade ago, as individual countries and as a region. The lectures and readings will cover the course these republics have charted for their political and economic transformation, the conflicts (Nagorno Karabagh, Abkhazia, South Ossetia) that have marred their development, their difficult relations with their stronger neighbors (Russia, Turkey, Iran), their path of integration in the international community, as well as the relationship between their domestic politics and their foreign and security policies.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 541/AAPTIS 467/Rel. 467. Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (HU).

    Foriegn Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 467.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 546/AAPTIS 495/WS 471/Rel. 496. Gender and Politics in Early Modern Islam.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. (3). (Excl).

    Foriegn Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 495.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 569/LHC 412 (Business Administration). American Business History.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Rowena Olegario

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The origins and development of and growth of business are studied. The course traces the beginnings of business enterprise in Europe and describes business activities during the American colonial, revolutionary, and pre-Civil War periods. It then discusses economic aspects of the Civil War, post-Civil War industrial growth, business consolidation and the antitrust movement, economic aspects of World War I, business conditions during the 1920s, effects of the 1929 depression and the New Deal upon business, economic aspects of World War II, post-war business developments and current business trends.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 592. Topics in Asian History.

    Section 001 GROUNDING THE FLOATING WORLD OF EARLY MODERN JAPAN: DOCUMENTS IN EARLY MODERN JAPAN. Meets with Asian Studies 491.???

    Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura (tomitono@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Japan's early modern age (1600-1868) often is viewed as a period dominated by oppressive samurai rule, rigid social hierarchy, economic stagnation, national insularity and restrictive Confucian morality. A closer look reveals that urban culture flourished in cities that were the world's largest, that peasants felt the samurai lord's authority only sporadically, and that ideas and goods from outside steadily entered the archipelago. What really went on? We will dig deeply into Japan's early modern age through lectures, discussion, and hands-on reading of documents in English translation and/or original Japanese. The course will bring alive the activities and concerns of women and men of various classes by high- lighting topics such as political authority, sexualities, rural and urban economic development, property relations, literacy, popular and high cultures, status and mobility, and crime and punishment. History 592 incorporates Asian Studies 491, the documents section (meets 8 times from Feb. 5 through March 7), which may be taken independently as a short course. Requirements include (1) class attendance and participation [10%], (2) a five-page paper that analyzes documents [25%], (3) a five-page response to each of the two take-home final exam questions [50%], and (4) occasional in-class "knowledge" based quizzes [15%]. No prerequisites required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

    Section 002 Anthropology/History Core Seminar. Meets with History 604.002.

    Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu), David Cohen

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Cultural Anthropology 558.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    Graduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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