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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Philosophy

This page was created at 7:20 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Philosophy
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PHIL

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Philosophy.


Philosophy is about as broad a subject as one can find in a university curriculum. It addresses a wide array of questions, some quite familiar (Does God exist? Why be moral? What is art?), others less so (What is a thing? Is space a substance?). Philosophy includes the examination of its own methods, and its own history.

It also falls within philosophy to examine the methods and practices of virtually all academic disciplines. Because of this breadth, a person can study philosophy in ways involving the styles and techniques of thought of most other fields of inquiry. For example, the work of a philosopher concentrating in logic is much like that of the student of mathematics. A philosopher primarily interested in the philosophy of religion will often be doing much the same things as a theologian or a student of the history of religion. Political philosophy is regarded by some as including political activity itself. Many other such examples exist. In addition, Philosophy examines the practices of other activities, such as the fine arts, that are sometimes thought of as different from typical academic disciplines. However, for the most part the activities characteristic of philosophy are peculiar to the discipline. The only way to know what it's really like is to give it a try.

The Department offers a number of courses that do not carry prerequisites: (A) general introductions designed to acquaint students with a representative sample of philosophical problems (181, 202, 232, and 297); (B) introductions that focus on a particular branch of philosophy or area of human concern e.g., the mind and consciousness, the law, and literature designed for students who, having no previous background in philosophy, want to study these areas in a philosophical way (196, 355, and 356); and (C) introductions to logic and reasoning (180, 201, and 303).

(A) The general introductions deal, for example, with questions concerning the nature of reality, knowledge, the self and the mind, freedom, morality, society, and religion, but they differ in their instructional format and staffing. Philosophy 202 is taught by advanced graduate students in independent sections of 25 students. Philosophy 181 is taught by faculty, in a combination lecture/discussion format, limited to 50 students. In Philosophy 232, a faculty member delivers a lecture two hours per week, and students divide into groups of 25 for discussion sections led by graduate students. Finally, Philosophy 297, "Honors Introduction", is taught by a faculty member to a group of 25 students.

(B) Winter courses not carrying prerequisites that focus on a specific area of human concern or philosophical thought include first-year seminars (196), "Contemporary Moral Problems" (355), and "Issues in Bioethics" (356). These courses do not require previous work in philosophy. Philosophy 196 is taught in a seminar format by a member of the faculty. In Philosophy 355 and 356, a faculty member delivers a lecture two hours per week, and students divide into groups of 25 for discussion sections led by graduate students.

A number of Winter 300-level courses require only a single philosophy introduction as a prerequisite: "Language and Mind" (345), "Political Philosophy" (366), "Experience and Reality" (383), "Continental Philosophy" (385), and "History of Philosophy: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century" (389). All of these courses meet requirements for the concentration.

(C) Among the introductions to logic, Philosophy 180 is designed both to improve critical reasoning skills, and to provide an introduction to formal logic. Philosophy 201, is designed to improve critical reasoning skills, through an introduction to informal logic. Philosophy 303 is an introduction to formal or symbolic logic. Philosophy 180 and 303 are taught by faculty, in a combination lecture/discussion format, limited to 50 students. Philosophy 201 is taught by advanced graduate student teaching assistants in independent sections of 25 students.

There is additional information about the Department's curriculum in "The Undergraduate Program in Philosophy." This brochure contains information intended for students interested in taking philosophy courses, whether or not they are considering a Philosophy concentration. The Department also maintains a home page (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/philosophy/). Students considering a concentration in Philosophy are encouraged to make an appointment with a Philosophy concentration advisor; students considering an Honors concentration should consult with the Philosophy advisor for the Honors concentration. To request a copy of the undergraduate brochure, or to schedule an appointment with a concentration advisor, contact the Department Office (2215 Angell Hall, 764-6285). The Office can also provide information about the Department's Undergraduate Philosophy Club and undergraduate e-mail group.


PHIL 180. Introductory Logic.

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Marc Aubrey Kelly (makelly@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 180 or 201. (3). (HU). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed both to improve critical reasoning skills that could be of use in a wide range of disciplines and careers, and to provide an introduction to formal logic. The course examines some of the problems and fallacies which arise in informal reasoning, some of the elements of formal (symbolic) logic, and logical concepts used in the analysis and criticism of arguments. This course may also give some attention to issues in branches of philosophy germane to logic, for example, the theory of knowledge, philosophy of language, and metaphysics. There will be lectures, demonstrations of problem-solving techniques, and a variety of exercises. The course is limited to 50 students, which should permit opportunity for discussion. Texts and methods of evaluation to be determined.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 180. Introductory Logic.

Section 003.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 180 or 201. (3). (HU). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed both to improve critical reasoning skills that could be of use in a wide range of disciplines and careers, and to provide an introduction to formal logic. The course examines some of the problems and fallacies which arise in informal reasoning, some of the elements of formal (symbolic) logic, and logical concepts used in the analysis and criticism of arguments. This course may also give some attention to issues in branches of philosophy germane to logic, for example, the theory of knowledge, philosophy of language, and metaphysics. There will be lectures, demonstrations of problem-solving techniques, and a variety of exercises. The course is limited to 50 students, which should permit opportunity for discussion. Texts and methods of evaluation to be determined.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines some of the main problems of philosophy, such as:

  • How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?
  • Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
  • If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any free will or moral responsibility?
  • Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
  • Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
  • What are the different kinds of social, political, and economic organization, and what reasons are there for preferring one to another?
  • How should one live one's life?
  • What is the meaning of life, and what does this question mean?
  • Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?

Students will write papers discussing a number of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Craig Malcolm Duncan (cdunc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Philosophy 181 is an introduction to several traditional problems of philosophy. After introducing students to some basic tools and methods of philosophy, the course will consider the following questions: (1) Are there good reasons for believing that God exists or does not exist? (2) If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any free will or moral responsibility? (3) In light of the challenges raised by (1) and (2), are we forced to conclude that morality is nothing but a social convention, or is it still possible to ground morality in something more objective? We will examine competing answers to each of these questions, drawing from ideas proposed by both contemporary and historical philosophers. The aim will be for students to think critically about these proposed answers, so that they may come to know first-hand what is required of a well-reasoned response to the course's questions.

COURSE MATERIALS:

  1. Joel Feinberg, Reason and Responsibility, 10th ed. (Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1999), available from Shaman Drum bookstore (313 S. State St., tel. 662-7407). This book comes bundled with an additional short book entitled Doing Philosophy: A Guide to the Writing of Philosophy Papers.
  2. A short course pack, available from Michigan Book and Supply (317 S. State St., tel. 665-4990). It is a good idea to call first to be sure some are available, as course packs are printed on an as-needed basis.

Copies of course materials will also be placed on reserve at the Shapiro library (i.e. the Undergraduate Library).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

  • One take-home reading quiz (5% of course grade): Early in the semester a set of comprehension questions will be passed out, to be completed (with typed answers) and turned in several days later.
  • Three exams (each worth 20% of course grade): There will be three exams, one after each of the course's units; all exams must be completed in order to pass the course. Each exam will be held in our usual classroom unless I notify you otherwise. Each exam will count 20% toward your overall grade.
  • One paper (25% of course grade): One 5-7 page paper must be completed in order to pass the course. Paper topics will be distributed in advance. Extensions will be granted only in extraordinary circumstances; papers turned in late without an extension will be marked down.
  • Class Participation (10% of course grade): Philosophy cannot be passively learned. It requires active engagement, both with the texts and with other individuals in the form of discussion. I will therefore usually devote some portion of the class period to discussion, and I will often break the class down into small groups for the purposes of discussion. When I do lecture, moreover, questions from students are welcomed and encouraged. Finally, I have set up an online conference in order to facilitate discus-sion of the course's issues. In order to get a good participation grade, you must:

    • have good class attendance
    • take part regularly in class discussion
    • take part regularly in the on-line conference discussion

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Brian P Macpherson

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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PHIL 196. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 How to be Human.

Instructor(s): Thornton Charles Kline III (tckline@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will look at the ways in which different philosophers from East Asia and the West have answered the questions "What is a human being?" and "How should I live?". All of the philosophers we will read believe the answers to these questions are connected, but their answers are substantially different. Since we ourselves need answers to these questions, considering these differences and their significance is an important step to finding our own answers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 196. First Year Seminar.

Section 002 Is Morality a Myth?

Instructor(s): Peter A Railton (prailton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many of the systems of values and norms that have been socially important in the past have come to be seriously questioned and, in some cases, rejected or profoundly changed systems of honor, caste, hereditary rule, race, gender, and so on. What about morality? Certainly it seems that moral practices involve many assumptions that might be questioned the possibility of free will, altruism, impartiality, universality, etc. We will look at various ways of raising questions about morality, and at some replies offered by philosophers, psychologists, and others.

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PHIL 201. Introduction to Logic.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 180 or 201. (3). (HU). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims to give students a thorough understanding of the fundamental forms of reasoning and rational argument, and to improve critical reasoning skills that could be of use in a wide range of disciplines and careers. The course examines some of the problems and fallacies which arise in informal reasoning and logical concepts used in the analysis and criticism of arguments. Some elements of formal (symbolic) logic might be introduced. Though students will be expected to master some technical detail, the course emphasizes informal logical techniques applicable to problem solving and argument in any area of inquiry. Both deductive and inductive patterns of argument will be examined. The small section size (25 students) is conducive to informality and considerable student participation. There will also be lectures, demonstrations of problem-solving techniques, and a variety of exercises. Normally, there are weekly assignments and short, periodic quizzes.

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PHIL 202. Introduction to Philosophy.

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include:

  • Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
  • If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
  • Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
  • Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
  • What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
  • Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
  • How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

In addressing these questions, some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers. Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers.

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PHIL 232. Problems of Philosophy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Joyce (jjoyce@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 181, 182, 202, 231, 234, or 297. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jjoyce/phil232.htm

This course provides undergraduates with a broad overview of modern philosophy. Topics to be covered will include at least some of the following:

  • The problem of free will: Do we choose our actions freely, or is what we do determined by past events? Can a person be held morally responsible for actions that she did not freely perform?
  • The problem of our knowledge of the external world: How can we gain knowledge of the world external to our minds given that we have access to nothing but our thoughts and experiences?
  • The problem of morality: What features of actions make them morally right or morally wrong? Is there any reason for us to act morally?
  • The problem of God: It is possible to establish God's existence by argument alone? Is the existence of God confirmed by what we know about the world?
  • The problem of mind: How is the mind related to the body? Is the mind an immaterial entity or can it be identified with the brain?
  • The problem of the state: On what is the state's authority based? Under what conditions can a government restrict individual freedoms for the purpose of securing collective benefits?

Students will be asked to read about 30 pages of material per week, to write three 7-8 page papers, and to take a midterm examination and a cumulative final exam.

TEXTS:

  • Feinberg, J. and Shafer-Landau, R. Reason and Responsibility, 10th ed. (Wadsworth Press, 1998)

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 296. Honors Introduction to Logic.

    Section 001 Symbolic Logic.

    Instructor(s): Allan F Gibbard (gibbard@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students or permission of instructor. Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 203, 303, or 296. (3). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This is a course in modern symbolic logic. The guiding idea is to use a symbolic language to examine such logical properties and relations as valid inference, consistency and inconsistency, and logical truth. We will study ways of reasoning about reasoning. There will be two in-class exams and a final exam. Homework will be assigned weekly, and satisfactory completion of the homework is a requirement of the course. Many good Honors students will find this course challenging, and working with course material should help students to develop skills in understanding concepts and methods of argumentation that are initially difficult.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 297. Honors Introduction to Philosophy.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Rachana Kamtekar (rkamteka@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students or permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will introduce students to some of the major problems of philosophy through a reading of some major works in the history of philosophy Plato's Meno, Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy, and Mill's Utilitarianism, along with some important criticisms of these works. Topics to be discussed include: the nature of knowledge, its starting points and limitations; free will; the relationship between mind and body; the aims and methods of moral reasoning.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 297. Honors Introduction to Philosophy.

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s): James P Tappenden (tappen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students or permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course serves as an introduction to three of the perennial issues on which the finest minds in history have exercised their intelligence.

    1. The first topic is philosophical scepticism: the thesis that you are never correct if you say you know something. As with many philosophical issues, this one is hard to believe, but also difficult to refute.
    2. The second topic is the relationship of the mind to the body and its physical activity. Are mental events just physical events such as states of the nervous system, or do they have a distinctive nature of their own?
    3. Finally, we will take up the question of how (if at all) we can rightly be said to act on rational decisions, or on choices made by our free will when we are apparently physical organisms in a universe governed by brute, unreasoning laws of nature.

    There will be three short papers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 303. Introduction to Symbolic Logic.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Richmond H Thomason

    Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 203, 296 or 414. (3). (MSA). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Symbolic logic is the application of formal, mathematical methods to reasoning. Its goal is to design logical languages which provide representations for the ingredients of reasoning, and to determine which forms of reasoning must produce true conclusions when applied to true premises. This course will introduce students to two classical systems of logic: the propositional calculus, which deals with negation, disjunction, and conjunction (not, or, and); and the logic of quantifiers, which deals with general forms using variables (like "x is larger than y" and generalizations (like "every x is larger than some y".) We will introduce systems of inference rules that allow us to study the nature of proof. We will also introduce the theory of truth and validity. This course will pay particular attention to the art of formalization, and will develop general methods for representing reasoning in common sense domains, such as the detection and diagnosis of faults in devices. There will be regular homework assignments, a midterm examination and a final.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 345. Language and Mind.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Eric P Lormand (lormand@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy course. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    How could beings with minds and languages have arisen out of a mindless and languageless universe? And can we scientifically explain mysteries of consciousness and meaning? We will start by tracking the evolutionary process from allegedly mind-independent bits of the world (e.g., atoms, genes) through language-independent minds (e.g., wolverines) to language-dependent minds (e.g., spartans) and to the alleged "social construction" of mind-dependent bits of the world (e.g., money, marriages). Then we will get down to detailed explanations of philosophically puzzling features of mind and language: consciousness (how one's mental states "feel" to one and how one knows about them), semantics (how brain tissues, noises, or ink marks come to be "about" things); and pragmatics (whether there are hidden rules or regularities underlying the "moves" we make in everyday conversation).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 355. Contemporary Moral Problems.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Peter A Railton (prailton@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 455. (4). (HU).

    R&E

    Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Contemporary life faces us with many questions that have moral dimensions, some obvious, some less so. In this course, we will explore the moral dimensions of a range of contemporary issues, including abortion, equality, affirmative action, freedom of expression, justice across national boundaries and across generations, and the treatment of animals. In the process, we will also be examining competing conceptions of morality and justice, and the presuppositions about human nature, society, and value that underlie them. In one unit of the course we will focus on questions about race and gender, looking first at conceptual and empirical issues concerning these two categories including the various real or alleged differences and inequalities associated with them and then at the moral issues they raise for contemporary society. Three papers and a final examination.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 356. Issues in Bioethics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): J David Velleman (velleman@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: No prerequisites; one philosophy introduction is recommended. (4). (HU).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: https://www-personal.umich.edu/~velleman/356/

    This course introduces areas of philosophical ethics that are relevant to decision-making in health care. It is NOT, however, a course in "medical ethics," since it focuses on philosophical theory rather than medical practice. There will be little or no discussion of specific medical cases, court decisions, or news items. The course will concentrate instead on theoretical questions such as:

    • "What is good for a person?,"
    • "Why is death usually bad for a person?,"
    • "Can death ever be good rather than bad?"

    Texts:

  • Coursepack, available at Excel Coursepacks and Copies, 1117 South University
  • John Martin Fischer (ed.), The Metaphysics of Death (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1993), available at Shaman Drum Books
  • John Perry, A Dialog on Personal Identity and Immortality (Indianapolis: Hackett, 1978), available at Shaman Drum Books

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 366. Introduction to Political Philosophy.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Craig Malcolm Duncan (cdunc@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (4). (HU).

    Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    OVERVIEW: This course aims to introduce students to several of the central topics in political philosophy, chiefly through an examination of the history of political thought in post-Reformation Europe. We will consider what important political thinkers have had to say about questions such as the following: Are we morally obligated to obey the law, and if so, why? Why should a state be organized in a democratic fashion? When may a state justifiably restrict its citizens' liberty? How much material inequality will a just state permit? Our focus will be on primary texts, although useful secondary literature will on occasion be included.

    COURSE MATERIALS: The following books are required. They are available from Shaman Drum bookstore (313 S. State St., tel. 662-7407).

    1. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan
    2. John Locke, Political Writings
    3. John Stuart Mill, On Liberty and Other Essays
    4. Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State, and Utopia
    5. John Rawls, A Theory of Justice (revised edition)
    6. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract

    A short course pack containing required reading is available from Michigan Book and Supply (317 S. State St., tel. 665-4990). It is a good idea to call first to be sure some are available, as course packs are printed on an as-needed basis.

    Copies of course material (including the course pack) will also be put on reserve at the University Library Reserve Service in the Undergraduate Library.

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

    • One final exam (worth 30% of course grade): The final exam (2 hours in length) must be completed in order to pass the course. It will consist of
      1. a section asking you to identify the authors of various quotations, as well as explain the authors' meaning;
      2. a section of short answer questions; and
      3. a section of essay questions.
    • Two papers (each worth 30% of course grade) : Two 68 page papers must be completed in order to pass the course. Paper topics will be distributed in advance, although with the professor's permission students can write on topics of their own choosing. Extensions will be granted only in extraordinary circumstances; papers turned in late without an extension will be marked down.
    • Class Participation (10% of course grade): Philosophy cannot be passively learned. It requires active engagement, both with the texts and with other individuals in the form of discussion. I have set up an online conference in order to facilitate discussion of the course's issues (see the instructions in the course pack). In order to get a good participation grade, you must:

      • have good class attendance
      • take part regularly in class discussion
      • take part regularly in the on-line conference discussion

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 369. Philosophy of Law.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    PHIL 383. Knowledge and Reality.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Adam Morton

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in philosophy. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will provide students with a broad overview of modern epistemology and metaphysics.

    Epistemology is the philosophical study of knowledge and justified belief. We will be concerned with two main epistemological issues:

    1. Is all knowledge based on a foundation of "basic" self-evident beliefs that themselves require no justification?
    2. To what extent must a believer have access to the facts that justify her beliefs?

    Metaphysics is the study of very general concepts and properties that apply to all existing objects. We will be primarily concerned with the following two questions:

    1. Is our division of objects in nature into different kinds a matter of pure convention, or do some of these divisions exist in nature itself?
    2. More generally, what does it mean to say that facts about the world are independent of us?

    Students will be asked to read about 40 pages of material per week, to write two 10-12 page papers, and to take a midterm and a final exam.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 385. Continental Philosophy Since 1900.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Michelle K Kosch (mkosch@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in philosophy. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The course will cover the recent history of social and political thought on the continent, with emphasis on the early Frankfurt School, Habermas and Foucault. Readings will also include selections from Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, and others.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 389. History of Philosophy: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries.

    Sections 003 and 004 satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

    Instructor(s): Louis E Loeb (lloeb@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (4). (HU).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course examines the development of modern philosophy in Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Considerable attention is devoted to each of Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. The primary emphasis is placed upon philosophical and interpretive issues that arise in conjunction with the philosophers' works. The philosophical issues addressed are drawn from epistemology and metaphysics: skepticism about the existence of the material world, theories of perception and of the nature of material objects, the problem of induction, the nature and limits of a priori knowledge, innate knowledge, empiricist theories of meaning, analytic and synthetic truth, necessary and contingent truth, God, substance, causation, free will and determinism, the self, the relationship between mind and body, and personal identity. Students are evaluated on the basis of three papers and midterm and final examinations. There are three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHIL 399. Independent Study.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for a total of eight credits with permission of concentration advisor.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Independent study of a topic not otherwise available through a regular departmental offering.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    PHIL 402. Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy.

    Section 001 Evolution, Thought, and Meaning.

    Instructor(s): Allan F Gibbard (gibbard@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Philosophical naturalists hold that the natural world is the entire world, ourselves included. But naturalists have been hard put to account for thought and meaning as aspects of the natural world. Thinking and meaning are activities of living beings, and Darwin's theory of natural selection is a general theory of how living beings acquire their inborn potentialities. This has led some philosophers to "teleosemantics", the view that what a person is thinking and what a person means are somehow a matter of the biological function of the brain mechanisms involved. Other philosophers even many philosophical naturalists reject any such view. The seminar will investigate philosophical debates over teleosemantics.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 405. Philosophy of Plato.

    Section 001 The Great Dialogues of Plato's "Middle Period" and his Ethical Psychology.

    Instructor(s): Rachana Kamtekar (rkamteka@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course, we will read the great dialogues of Plato's "middle period" (broadly construed), with special attention to Plato's views on ethical psychology. Topics to be discussed include: desire and motivation; the relationship between virtue, knowledge or true belief and happiness; and pleasure. Although our focus will be on the ethical psychology of Plato's middle period, we will also examine Plato's metaphysics and epistemology where these are relevant to his ethical psychology, and we will consider Plato's views in these dialogues in light of views on related topics in the early dialogues and criticisms in later dialogues. Dialogues to be studied include: Protagoras, Phaedo, Gorgias, Republic, Symposium, Phaedrus, and Philebus.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 415. Advanced Mathematical Logic.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Thomas Hofweber (hofweber@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phil. 414. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 417. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    We will discuss and prove some of the highlights in logic such as Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems, and various results in proof theory and set theory, depending on student interest and background.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 420. Philosophy of Science.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): James P Tappenden (tappen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in logic, and either Phil. 345 or 383. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course provides upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students with a broad overview of the philosophy of science. It seeks to clarify the nature of the "scientific method" and to explain its success. Topics to be covered include: the process by which scientific hypotheses are confirmed by empirical evidence, the nature of scientific laws and their role in explanation, the logical and semantic structure of scientific theories, the "realism/anti-realism debate" concerning the nature of unobservable entities and processes, the objectivity of science, the distinction between science and nonscience. Students will be asked to read about 50 pages of material per week, to write two 10-12 page papers, and to take a midterm examination and a final.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 428/Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

    Foriegn Lit

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Political Science 428.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 455. Contemporary Moral Problems.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Peter A Railton (prailton@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to graduate students in philosophy. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 355. (4). (Excl). Does not meet the Philosophy Department's 400-level course requirement for Philosophy concentrators.

    R&E

    Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Intended primarily for graduate students outside the philosophy department. Course content is the same as in Philosophy 355. Philosophy 455 requires longer and more substantial papers than those expected in Philosophy 355.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 462. British Empiricism.

    Section 001 The British Empiricists & the French Enlightenment.

    Instructor(s): Edwin M Curley (emcurley@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~emcurley/462syl01.htm

    The content of this course will be considerably broader than the title suggests. In addition to studying the three classical British Empiricists (Locke, Berkeley and Hume), we will also give nearly equal time to some of the leading figures of the French Enlightenment (Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot and Rousseau). There will be two papers, a midterm and a final. For further details please consult the professor's web site: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~emcurley/

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 466. Topics in Continental Philosophy.

    Section 001 Kierkegaard.

    Instructor(s): Michelle Kosch (mkosch@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One of Phil. 371, 375, 385, or 389. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The main focus of the course will be Kierkegaard's pseydonymous authorship and its historical context. Readings will include portions of Philosophical Fragments, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, The Concept of Anxiety and The Sickness unto Death, as well as selections from Hegel, Fichte, Schelling, Jacobi, and Schleiermacher. Depending on student interest, some time may be spent at the end of the academic term on Kierkegaard's impact on some figure in the 20th century (Wittgenstein and Heidegger come first to mind, but other suggestions will be welcome).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 467/Chinese 467. Confucianism.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Thornton Charles Kline III (tckline@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing; no knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Chinese 467.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHIL 475/Chinese 475/Asian Studies 475/RC Hums. 475/Hist. of Art 487. The Arts and Letters of China.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be included in a concentration plan in philosophy.

    Foriegn Lit

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/asian/475/001.nsf

    See Chinese 475.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHIL 481. Metaphysics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Thomas Hofweber (hofweber@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phil. 345 or 383. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hofweber/courses/

    An examination of some of the central problems in metaphysics such as appearance and reality, time, universals and particulars, causation, realism and anti-realism, ontology, and others.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 486/WS 486. Topics in Feminist Philosophy.

    Section 001 Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.

    Instructor(s): Elizabeth S Anderson (eandersn@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in either Philosophy or Women's Studies. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/phil/486/001.nsf

    The topics for this term are feminist epistemology and philosophy of science. Is knowledge gendered? Are scientific conceptions of objectivity "masculine"? What could it mean to make such claims, and how could they be justified? We will investigate the varied ways ideas about gender, gender roles, and gender identity influence the construction of knowledge and the representation of objectivity. Competing views about these influences empiricism, standpoint theory, postmodernism will be explored in the context of empirical research in the social sciences, biology, and medicine. Special attention will be given to the interaction of evidence and social/political values in inquiry. There will be a research paper, one short paper, and a final examination. Classes will be conducted as interactive lecture/discussions. Students with background (at least 2 courses) in either philosophy or women's studies are welcome to join a constructive dialogue.

    Texts:

  • Helen Longino, Science as Social Knowledge (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990). This book has been ordered at Shaman Drum Bookshop, 313 S. State St., 662-7407.
  • Donna Haraway, Primate Visions: Gender, Race, and Nature in the World of Modern Science (New York: Routledge, 1989). This book may be ordered from Amazon.com (which promises delivery in a few days) or another bookstore.
  • A Coursepack, available at Excel Test Preparation, Coursepacks & Copies, 1117 South University (the second floor above Ulrich's Art and Electronics), 996-1500.
  • The Course Website, at http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/phil/486/001.nsf. A few readings will only be accessible online through this website. Go to the online course syllabus and click on the link to the title of the reading assignment.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHIL 499. Senior Honors in Philosophy.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: By departmental permission only. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Students who wish to elect the Philosophy 498-499 sequence should consult with the departmental Honors advisor by the end of the preceding academic year.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    Graduate Course Listings for PHIL.


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