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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars

This page was created at 7:21 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for LHSP

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Lloyd Hall Scholars.


LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 001 SAVE: Students Against Violence Everywhere. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 22. (Drop/Add deadline=February 5).

Instructor(s): Melissa Dreyling (mdreylin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

SAVE: Students Against Violence Everywhere (S.A.V.E.) promotes nonviolence and safe schools and communities by educating students and enlisting them and their parents in activities to reduce the violent behaviors that threaten our youth. This course will connect U-M students with elementary school kids, working toward a better understanding of nonviolent alternatives to conflict.

This section will meet for eight consecutive weeks starting Monday, January 22, from 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 002 K-grams. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 21. (Drop/Add deadline=February 2).

Instructor(s): Rishi Moudgil (rmoudgil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.kgrams.org/

K-grams (short for "Kids Programs") is a student led volunteer organization in its third year at U-M. Alice Lloyd Hall residents are paired up with elementary students in a Detroit school for a variety of volunteer programs. The main vehicle is a pen pal program between the college and elementary students and a Kids-Fair that brings over 1,000 kids to campus. Additional activities, include the BookMARK reading/mentoring program, and other in-school and residence hall learning projects. You will engage with the younger kids through one of these programs, as well as help plan a fun and educational project for the students.

This section will meet monthly over the course of the entire Winter term. Section meetings will be held on Sundays, from 7-9 p.m., with the first section meeting on Sunday, January 7.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 003 Habitat for Humanity. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 24. (Drop/Add deadline=February 7).

Instructor(s): Bjorn Hansen (hansenb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever lain in bed on a stormy night and contemplated what your life would be like if you were homeless? Or thought about the issue of affordable housing in our society today? Or maybe just had a dream to wear a tool-belt and really get to build something? Habitat for Humanity is an international, nonprofit organization working with volunteer builders and donors to create decent and affordable houses for those in need of shelter. Students in this section will participate in the construction of a house in Washtenaw County under the guidance and leadership of Habitat for Humanity.

Sections will meet by arrangement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 004 Restoration Ecology. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 7. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Susan Bryan (sebryan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Work toward improving the natural environment in your own back yard! This section of LHSP 100 will participate in two Restoration Ecology Workdays in the UM Arboretum. We will work to remove invasive plant species from the Arb, promote native plant growth, or prepare sites for new plantings. No prior experience necessary! Students will be provided with a short orientation before work begins. This is a great opportunity to learn about a beautiful natural resource that is open and available to you year round.

The first meeting for this section will be on January 7 at 7:30 p.m.; at that time, dates and times for further section meetings will be scheduled for eight consecutive weeks.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 001 Academic and Career Exploration. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 9. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Connie Rose Tingson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Can you count how many times you've been asked, "what do you want to be when you "grow up?" Did you know the answer? For many of us, we still don't know the answer to that question, and, if we do, we're still working on how to get there.

This class is for people who know they want to do great things in their lives, but aren't exactly sure what that is. It is also for people who know what they want to do, but aren't exactly sure of how to go about doing it. We will explore issues around academic and career goals. Additionally, we will discuss strategies and opportunities for achieving those goals.

This course will meet for eight consecutive Tuesdays, from 12-1 p.m., starting on January 9 (no meeting on February 26 due to Spring Break).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 002 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 7. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Mina Rim (mrim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

You've finished your first term in college and you still don't know what you want to do with the rest of your life? Don't freak out just yet. This class will help you explore your personality, develop a stronger sense of your strengths, and aid you in your search for a concentration and career direction. We will talk about integrating your talents and values in the search for a so-called life purpose. Discover early in your college career the steps you need to take in order to succeed at this university. Learn how to navigate the U-M environment, especially in order to find resources regarding concentrations, minors, careers, internships, as well as work and study abroad opportunities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 113. Studies in Social and Political History II.

Section 001 In Search of America's Civil Rights Movement

Instructor(s): Joseph Gonzalez (joegon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umichstudent.com/getonthebus

If you like boring lectures, multiple choice tests, and lots of assigned readings, then this course is not for you. This course is for people who want something different from their university and themselves.

In this course, we will study the most successful non-violent movement in American history: The Civil Rights Movement, 1956-1965. At times, we will learn about this movement from books. Just as frequently, we will learn from experience, traveling throughout the South and designing a social activism project of our own. Make no mistake: This academic term you will do more than read about the Civil Rights Movement; you will experience it.

The course is divided into two parts. In January and February, we will discuss the history of the Civil Rights Movement, discovering its origins and defining its conclusion. After spring break, during March and April, we will consider the Movement's legacy in such issues as affirmative action, racial profiling, and capital punishment. Just as important, we will explore the role of social activism in our own lives, designing an activism project in conjunction with the Ginsburg Center for Community Service and Learning.

During the academic term, you will write two essays in two drafts, one before the trip, one at the close of the class. You will also keep a detailed journal of your experience on the trip and with the activism project, putting your journals in a web site of your own design.

This course is offered concurrently with LHSP 151.008, a trip to visit famous people and places in the Civil Rights Movement over spring break. You do not have to register for LHSP 151 in order to take this course. If, however, you wish to take the spring break trip, you must register for this course (LHSP 113.001).

For a description of the spring break trip, you may wish to visit the web site from last year's trip: http://www.umichstudent.com/getonthebus.

Come join us. It will be a course (and a trip) that you will not soon forget.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 120. Political and Social Problems I.

Section 001 Envisioning Future Neighborhoods. Meets with Natural Resources and Environment 306.033.

Instructor(s): Teresa Buckwalter (tbuckwal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Would you like to affect change in a local community? This course will focus on urban neighborhoods: what issues do they face, how could they be planned and designed to better serve residents' needs and promote healthy local ecology? Using a neighborhood in Ypsilanti as a case study, we will examine these issues in a real context.

We will explore the local environmental and human history not only through readings, but also through field trips, discussions with residents and working in conjunction with students from a local middle school. Working in small groups, you will create a vision for the future of this neighborhood. You will communicate your vision through written recommendations that include commuter graphic images. And finally, you will present your vision to community members and local officials. Not only will you be effecting change; you will also be building better writing, computer graphic, and public speaking skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125(165). College Writing.

Section 001 You Don't Choose Your Family?! Critical Perspectives on Families

Instructor(s): Natalie Rothman (nrothman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nrothman/LHSP125/

How do you feel about living with your parents in your thirties? Do you often remember how tough it was to be a five-year-old? What do you think of same-sex families? Do you want to have children? How would you balance career and homemaking? These are very personal questions. Yet our answers depend not only on personal inclinations, but also on values and customs shared by others in our society. What can different perspectives (economic, psychological, sociological, historical, and anthropological) tell us about our personal experiences? What can different families teach us about the things we take for granted?

In this course, we will discuss families using insights from different academic disciplines, such as anthropology, sociology, history and cultural studies. We will also look at the ways past societies have defined what is a family and what are its obligations to its members. You will then write five essays about topics such as family portraits and what they conceal, about state policy and their effect on family life, and about TV families and their relationship to reality. You will develop writing skills that will allow you to take a critical look at your personal experience and to examine it in the wider context of contemporary and historical societies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125(165). College Writing.

Section 002 Beyond O.J. and Nicole: The Realities of Sexual and Domestic Violence.

Instructor(s): Melissa Dreyling (mdreylin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Everyone has an opinion about the guilt or innocence of O.J., but how many people have thought about the complicated dynamics of domestic violence that led to the trial of O.J. Simpson?

In this class, we will examine the cultural and legal history of domestic and sexual violence and explore how this type of violence affects families, communities, and individuals. We will also explore a variety of issues that many people identify as the sources of sexual and domestic violence, like pornography, prostitution, media representations of women, and gender roles of men and women.

Many sexual assaults that happen on college campuses involve acquaintances and go unreported. We will explore why women are not reporting these assaults. We will also look at how other factors, like alcohol, play a role in campus assaults and examine some of the myths about sexual assault. For example, is acquaintance rape just a matter of women not being forceful enough when saying no?

Assignments will include outside of class activities, five papers, and selected readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125(165). College Writing.

Section 003 Nike, the World Bank, and the 1999 Seattle Riots: Topics on Economic Development

Instructor(s): Jordan Shapiro (jors@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What exactly is "globalization", the "Third World", a "developing nation", or the World Bank? Do you know what those acronyms IMF, WTO, USAID stand for? Well, they are all at the heart of one of the most crucial issues of the 21st century: the relationship between the more "advanced", technological societies and the poorer nations, most of which are in Latin America, Africa, and Asia.

Our class will introduce you to some of these terms by discussing, analyzing, and writing about the important political, economic, and social impact that economic and international development efforts have on people all around the world. The class will address topics such as poverty, environmental degradation, gender relationships, technological development, Nike and the labor rights debate, and free trade. Student will write five five-page papers that will require them to understand and explain various perspectives on these issues. On a broader level, Nike, the World Bank, and the 1999 Seattle Riots will provide students with tools for understanding the terms of the conflicts and debates that pervade current events and international affairs. You will better understand political, social, and economic policies, and, as a result, become more informed consumers of products and of the media.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125(165). College Writing.

Section 004 John Wayne Meets GI Jane: How Do We View the Military?

Instructor(s): Bjorn Hansen (hansenb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hansenb/lhsp125009.htm

Were Black soldiers cannon fodder in Vietnam? Was the draft a fair means of raising an army? Is today's military culture isolated from, and at odds with, civilian 21st century America?

America has a military institution that broke some enormous class, race, and generation barriers: they racially integrated, a full decade before the rest of the country, African Americans into their corps; they sent an entire generation to college and made the first serious attempt at correcting adult illiteracy; and they made long-lasting efforts at providing a middle-class living to many Americans who would otherwise face spare economic opportunities.

At the same time, the military is said to breed an air of contempt for civilian life and values. It is a culture where anti-gay and sexist rhetoric and violence has been tacitly endorsed among the ranks.

The military at one time or another has been all of these and more. So how has the perspective of the military changed over the past fifty plus years? In this class, we will look at four main issues regarding the military: women in the military; integration of the races; a draft versus volunteer military; and the potential split between military and civilian societies.

Our class will learn about the changing perspectives of the military through assigned readings, class speakers, movies, and taped interviews. The goal of this class is to gain an understanding of how society and the military interact and perceive one another. The above topics will be addressed through assigned articles, chapters from books, taped interviews, class speakers, and movies. The movies will be viewed at bi-weekly showings in the evening (bring your snacks). These will include: Born on the Fourth of July, Full Metal Jacket, Courage Under Fire, Dr. Strangelove (How I learned to stop Worrying and Love the Bomb), A Soldiers Story, Saving Private Ryan, and The Longest Day.

Grades will be based on five five-page papers, including one revised paper. Each of these papers will cover one of the four main issues to be covered in the class. We will also respond to several specific readings through two-page response essays. These are to help students think more deeply about each reading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125(165). College Writing.

Section 005 Writing for Life: Work, Life, Passion and Finding a Job.

Instructor(s): Susan Bryan (sebryan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tired of writing literary criticism? Wondering how writing skills will fit into the rest of your life? This class will focus on the roles writing will play throughout a person's life from work, where the smooth cover letter will pave your way to a swell job, to public life where a passionate letter to the editor changes the course of public discourse. After writing for the workplace and the public realm, we will explore the more personal aspects of writing, where the process of writing is used as a tool to explore our own thoughts, and to capture our ruminations on the meaning of life. How can writing serve us as a device to think? How can we use writing to leave a legacy?

Writing is a personal endeavor, but it is also public, as the published ruminations of writers show us. We will read examples of each genre of writing, critique them, and then write. Everyone will be expected to contribute to class discussions about assigned readings, and the work of other students. Critical, yet constructive, editing and critiquing skills will be emphasized. Each student will develop an individual voice as different roles in life are considered, and the multi-dimensionality of life is documented through writing.

The class will focus on the process of writing, from our own stream of consciousness, to getting it down on paper, to the rough draft, and then through refining the final version. The connection between thought and pencil will be strengthened, and you will be encouraged to examine and refine your own writing process which you can then use throughout your college career.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125(165). College Writing.

Section 006 Reasonable Doubt.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Robinson (jrrobins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrrobins/Doubt/

"A recent survey indicates that 68% of all college freshmen have smoked marijuana."

"Polls indicate that George W. Bush has taken the lead in New Hampshire."

"Violence in schools has risen 1.3% since the Columbine shootings."

Every day we are assailed with information, from the news media, from advertising... even from professors. But what does it all really mean? A survey of whom? How do the polls obtain their data? Just how do you calculate the rate of violence in schools? Asking questions such as these is not simply blind rejection of authority. Educated skepticism is based on asking the right questions to recognize false arguments, identify meaningless statistics, and uncover biased information. It is a vital tool for analyzing and evaluating information effectively. This course will introduce you to methods of critical thinking and show you how to apply them in a variety of situations in and out of the classroom. These methods will help you to become a better reader: one who knows how to pick out useful information, view it with a critical eye, and retain the most important points. And they will help you become a better writer: one who can identify relevant information, decide what data to include, and present it convincingly. These are tools for survival, and will change the way you view information, both in the college classroom and in the world beyond it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125(165). College Writing.

Section 007 The Evolution of Environmental Activism.

Instructor(s): Denise L. Pascual (dpascual@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dpascual/lhsp125/

From the Transcendentalists to Ecoterrorism, the environmental movement has sustained drastic changes. Transformations in every aspect from leaders to membership, underlying motivation to outward public perception, and small, grassroots, shoe-string budget interest groups to large, national and international, heavily funded and bureaucratized organizations, have, over the period of a few decades, strengthened and modernized the movement. While all this growth and change has benefited the movement, it has also created an unforeseen side effect: pessimism.

While the first environmentalists, the Transcendentalists such as Thoreau, Muir, and Emerson, quietly wrote about conservation for the sake of preserving nature's intrinsic beauty, the new breed of modern environmentalists all preach the dogma of "Thou shalt care, for the end of the world cometh." Somewhere along the way, the environmental movement became a social cause based on a pessimistic view of the world humans were and are now creating.

In this course, we will use readings from all major eras of the environmental movement to decipher how and why perceptions on environmentalism have developed and are perpetuated in our modern society. Beginning with a few readings from the Conservation Era and the Transcendentalists, moving on to the Modern Era and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, and ending with Scott Sherman's It's the End of the World as We Know It and I Could Use a Drink, we will attempt to track the environmental movement's evolution.

Not only will you leave the class with a stronger understanding of the environmental movement and how you can personally affect your relationship to the environment, but you will gain a strong understanding of college writing. Over the course of the academic term we will compose five critical essays on topics related to class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 001 In the Beginning Was the Word, or Was it the Matrix? Creating Yourself through Creative Writing.

Instructor(s): Cecilia Infante (ceciliai@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do you believe that divine fate, free will, or random chance guides your life? Do you choose who you want to be or does your DNA determine your personality? If you've ever wondered whether you are in charge of your heart and mind or if invisible strings manipulated by god, your culture, your subconscious, your language control your choices, then take this class. We take these questions on our voyage into the deepest recesses of ourselves through two forms of creative expression: poetry and memoir.

We will read poems and memoirs by creative writers who live to write because they write to live writers who work by Hemingway's precept that their root charge is to distinguish what they really think from what their culture would have them think. This "honesty-principle" will guide our trip into ourselves, as we forge our own languages and personal mythologies. After all, how can we live freely, on our own terms, if we don't even know what our own terms are?

You will have two main writing projects: (1) a journal where you will record and interpret your dreams daily; and (2) a polished chapter from your memoir or a collection of poems. During the course of the academic term, you will explore both genres by reading great poets and writers and then emulating the techniques of their craft. You will compose approximately 100 pages of writing by April. You will draft poems and memoirs, exploring each of these forms until you feel confident enough to compose a final prose or poetry project of your own. We will work as a team, workshopping every draft in peer or full-class editing sessions. Because this class is about self-discovery and creative communication, you must be prepared to take risks, battle with your beliefs, and (most importantly) give thoughtful, honest feedback to your peers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 002 Self-Portraiture: Beyond the Mirror Image.

Instructor(s): Annie O'Kane (okane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever tried to describe yourself in twenty words or less or tried to draw a picture of yourself with only twenty lines? If you had to choose a specific color, landscape, and animal to identify with, what would they be? This course will give you the opportunity to explore the self portrait by gathering and combining words, lines, shapes, colors, and images which, when brought together, create an image of yourself. You will receive instruction in basic drawing, painting, printing, and collage to assist you in creating your self-portrait. We will also look at a variety of artists and their expressions through self-portraiture. A $25 lab fee is required which will cover the expense of all materials which are provided for you. No previous experience in studio art is necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 004 On Writing... Meets with LHSP 151.008

Instructor(s): Denise Lani Pascual (dpascual@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dpascual/on_writing/

Once upon a time, we learned to write. Using simple paper and crayon, our hands forcibly carved out the images of letters neatly hung over the chalkboard in our kindergarten classroom. Over the course of our elementary, middle school, junior high school, and senior high school experience, we surpassed this mechanical rote memorization of writing and moved onto something more meaningful, more visceral. Our childish crayoned scrawl was replaced with multi-fonted typewriters or computers, our flimsy notebook of large-lined paper upgraded to 20 lb. multi-purpose, bleached white, guaranteed not to jam printer paper, our repeated copies of the alphabet scripted and structured into sentences, and finally, our homework papers evolved into essays. Here, we began our journey of knowing how to write.

But, while we spent all of our time learning how to write, have we ever really had the time or the luxury to ask ourselves, "Why write?" It seems that we never had a choice. Afterall, what kindergartener would know the gravity of writing her first "A"? Yes, later in our academic life, we had the choice of to write or to fail, but anyone here at the University of Michigan made the obvious choice to write. So now, we begin our journey of knowing why to write.

Over the course of this semester, we will struggle with these two questions of how and why. In order for students to test the validity of their writing convictions, students will be required to tutor students on writing in the LHSP Writing Center located in Alice Lloyd Hall. Students will write several short essays (400 words) and one final essay of 5-7 pages. Assigned readings will come from a pre-determined list of books and short essays of prominent writer's thoughts on writing. This list includes Stephen King's (book) On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft, bell hooks' (essay) "Remembering Rapture," and David Huddle's (essay) "The Writer as Student and Teacher". The number of readings and short essays for which each student is responsible will depend on the number of elected credits (1 or 3 credits). Because students will choose which readings to read and what essays to write, the student can tailor the class to fit his or her specific interests in writing (academic writing or creative writing, poetry or prose). Grades will be determined by the quality of the essays and quality of tutorship (tutoring evaluations).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 150. Focused Studies.

Section 001 Introduction to Computer (Social) Science. (1 credit). 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 9. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Erik Hofer (ehofer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide an introduction to the social issues surrounding computers, the Internet, and the "information age." We will examine how social science and technology intersect in this new wired world, the politics and social dynamics of Napster, Gnutella, open source software, new ways of working, and look at the past, present, and future of the environment that gave rise to the dot-com era. Students will learn to examine the social dynamics that shape how information technology changes society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 001 The Rhetoric of Civil Violence: From Caesar to Shakespeare and Beyond. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 11. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu), David Potter (dsp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The visit of the Royal Shakespeare Company to Ann Arbor offers not only an opportunity to watch some of the world1s finest actors, but also an invitation to contemplate the role of hatred in the formation of a nation. Civil War is a phenomenon of many societies; the intensity of strife may set a nation on a new course, as conflicts are resolved, or undo it utterly. The plays that the RSC will be performing, Henry VI, parts 1, 2 and 3 and Richard III reflect the mythology of the War of the Roses as it was reconstructed by the victorious side. Theirs was not the first regime to do such a thing, and they had before them the example of Rome, for the Roman Monarchy was also the product of civil war. In this course we will be exploring ways in which Roman civil war narratives developed from the "bare-bones" (if scarcely straightforward) participant account of Caesar through later, retrospective narratives in Lucan and Tacitus. Shakespeare and his contemporaries were brought up in school on these Roman writers who thus became an important source of ideas for understanding civil order and disorder and for expressing its meanings and emotions. When he developed the startling idea of writing the English history of the century previous to his own as a sustained drama focussing on the War of the Roses, Shakespeare drew on that rhetoric powerfully. The RSC will present a company expert in staging the order and the violence, physical and rhetorical, which Shakespeare presents, and by staging these dramas now and here presents them for our understanding of processes contemporary that remains very much of the modern world. We will conclude by examining some more modern accounts of civil strife. All students will be expected to attend one of the plays, tickets will be subsidized (in part) by LHSP.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 002 The Lord of the Rings. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 9. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): David Potter (dsp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

J.R.R. Tolkein's Lord of the Rings is one of the most widely read, and beloved, books of the second half of the twentieth century. Perhaps as remarkable as its success is the fact that it was ever written at all. Tolkein was not a writer of fiction by profession, instead he was the notably under-productive (even in Oxford of the 1930s-50s) Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo Saxon at Oxford. With few (but excellent) works of scholarship to his credit, colleagues at times wondered what he was doing. The Hobbit appeared almost by accident: he lent the manuscript to a friend who had the flu and she passed it on to a former student of Tolkein's who worked for a publishing house. The Lord of the Rings sprang from the rejection of the work that he really wanted to publish (and never did, in his lifetime). We can now watch him at work on the book through the publication of his early manuscripts, watch him struggling to find a story and then to give it meaning. The purpose of the course is to follow the emergence of The Lord of the Rings from Tolkein's drafts through his many explanations of what it meant, an interpretation that was continuing to evolve up to the end of his life. The existence of so many of Tolkein's papers and letters gives us a chance to watch the author at work, and to explore fundamental questions about what it means to be a writer.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 003 Destroying the Barriers and Preconceptions around Making Art. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 10. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Brian Tubbs (tubbsbl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objective of this class is to continue using creative energy in the exploration of our own motivations. Mapping out our ideas and researching other artists, students will design independent projects. During the seven weeks of this course, students will develop their ability of expression of their own, and pursue the unknown. The goal is for each student to produce one major project that will require the collaboration of the rest of the class and present it to the public.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 004 Acting for Non-Actors. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 8. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Steiger (pixi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever felt that, given the chance, you could act? Do you sometimes feel like you could do better what you see some others do on the stage and screen? Or does stage fright keep you day dreaming? Do you miss the time you could play and pretend without feeling stupid?

In this class, you will study the basics of acting and character development. Using a variety of games and exercises, you will rekindle your imagination, sense of play, and confidence. We will, as a group and class, work together to address the conflicts of stage fright and public speaking to create a class that you are comfortable in. You will learn how to bring yourself to a part, and let go of old fears that tie you down.

You are required to learn and perform one monologue and one scene, and to attend all classes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 005 Russia on the Great Lakes. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 8. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will look at the shape and character of an exemplary and growing community of new immigrants to Southeast Michigan, native speakers of Russian from the former Soviet Union. Themselves forming very diverse communities, they provide insight into one of the most interesting and significant phenomena in today's United States the many worlds created and sustained by waves of immigration from all over the world. The course will examine the cultural, economic, legal, linguistic, national, generational and other issues, which unite and/or divide these immigrants. We will examine accounts of "being in America" and "being an American" provided by various immigrants from Russia. We will look at institutions which play a role in these communities, from local Orthodox Churches, Synagogues, and related bodies, to newspapers, stores, and cultural events such as concerts and plays. We will talk to representatives of some of these institutions and to some of the immigrants themselves, and will attempt to map out a cultural geography of this world, largely invisible to the outsider, but actually extensive and complex. During the course, students will be encouraged to explore parallels with other immigrant communities (for example, South East Michigan is home to many Arab-Americans, and has a significant Hispanic population). The course will include reading and viewing assignments, field trips, interviews, and research on the World Wide Web, and will require one eight-page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 006 Get on the Bus: In Search of America's Civil Rights Movement. Meets during Spring Break. (Drop/Add deadline=February 23).

Instructor(s): Joseph Gonzalez (joegon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What are you doing for spring break? Are you going to Ft. Lauderdale? Cancun? Or do you want something different something you will remember long after a sunburn heals and a hangover fades? If you do, then look no further. We'll get you out of Ann Arbor and out of the classroom. We'll take you places that you have never seen before. We'll show you what it was like to risk your life in the cause of freedom.

In this course, you will visit the people and places of America's Civil Right's Movement. You will see the sites of Martin Luther King's birth and assassination, as well as the locations of famous demonstrations and protests from Tennessee to Mississippi. Along the way, you will meet people who were there on the front line in the fight for civil rights, people often no older than you.

The requirements for this class are simple. You must register for LHSP 113.001, a three-credit course on the history of the Civil Rights Movement. During the trip, you must keep a detailed a journal of your impressions and experiences. If last year offers any guide, the cost of this trip to you should be very modest.

So leave your books, your computer (and your sun block) behind. Come experience history with your own eyes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 007 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 8. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Anne Marie Wait

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 008 On Writing... Meets with LHSP 140.004.

Instructor(s): Denise Lani Pascual (dpascual@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dpascual/on_writing/

See Lloyd Hall Scholars 140.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 200. Advanced Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 001 Advanced Leadership and Service Learning. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 11. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Jonah Burakowski (jonahb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 100. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini-course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section of LHSP 200 will take students from the theory component of leadership development to the practical process. Course activities will cover the basic concepts essential to personal skill development and behavioral leadership, while discussion and experimental exercises will allow you to self-initiate skill development and examine your beliefs. This course will explore the ways in which participating in community service learning benefits the development of leadership skills.

This course will meet for eight consecutive weeks on Wednesdays, starting January 19, from 6:30-8 pm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

LHSP 201. Advanced Academic and Professional Development.

Section 201 Living Liminally: The "Unreal" in Campus Life. 8-week minicourse beginning Jan. 11. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Brian Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Required of all second-year students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 101. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One often hears the comment "college life is not real life." While there may be some truth to this statement, it is usually in the context of some disparagement of the supposed utopian undergraduate experience that outsiders of various sorts make such statements. But are there aspects of "America at Play" that the media and other analysts or observers have neglected to address? Identifying the "unreal" in college life can serve as an impetus for exploring not only misconceptions about, but also the positive contributions of, the university experience. Personal and professional exploration of this mythical unreal will constitute the core of our projects and meeting with our aim being to transform exploration into action.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 229/English 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott G Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/english/229/001.nsf

See English 229.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Graduate Course Listings for LHSP.


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