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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish

This page was created at 7:24 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Spanish
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SPANISH

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Spanish.


Waitlists

Students who wish to register for a class that is closed should get on the WAITLIST through wolverineaccess.umich.edu, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

LSA seniors and Romance Languages concentrators may be given priority over others on the waitlist.

Elementary Language Courses

After the first two meetings of the class, the instructors and course coordinators will give permissions to register to students who have attended the class. Any student who has not attended the first two class meetings may be dropped from the registration list or from the waitlist, and will not be given permission to register.

Placement Tests

Students who intend to continue language study begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine which level is appropriate for their skills. Students who began language study at another college or university are also strongly encouraged to take the placement test. No preparation is necessary for the placement test it is intended as a tool to place students in the course where they will gain the most.

The results of the placement test will be communicated to the academic advisors in the student's home college. LSA students should make an appointment with an advisor in 1255 Angell Hall, (734) 764-0332.

Students will be placed in one of the following courses:
101 (Elementary)
103 (Elementary review)
231 (Second year, first semester)
232 (Second year, continued)

Students may also place beyond 232, which means that they have satisfied the LSA language requirement.

Students with questions about their placement should consult the Course Coordinator of the course into which they have been placed.

For a list of Romance Languages Course Coordinators, see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/coords.html


SPANISH 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, three exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing Spanish 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paulo Cesar Polo Chavez

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 111. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish 112 is designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~span231/

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Course grade is based on a series of quizzes and exams (written and oral) designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand spoken Spanish plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

Required materials:

  • Visión y Voz, Galloway-Labarca (Wiley). (Students placed in 231 have the option to buy the customized version for Spanish 231 that contains only the last two units of the book, workbook and laboratory manual).
  • Spanish 231. Coursepack. (Fall 2000). Primis custom publishing (McGraw-Hill Co.)
  • Bluebooks to be used for journal entries (available at bookstores).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

    Elementary Language Courses

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/spanish/232/001.nsf

    The principal aim of this course is to acquire a more profound understanding of the history, politics, society, culture, customs, and literature of the Hispanic world through listening, writing, reading, and speaking activities in Spanish. At the same time, students develop the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Hispanic culture and to analyze these situations while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Therefore, the practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary is integrated into the content of the course and students are expected to formally study and practice these structures individually through the explanations provided in the textbook and the practice activities assigned as homework. Materials include newspaper articles, cultural readings, videos, short lectures, audio cassette, and computer materials. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance crucial. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, compositions, exams, and a final written and oral exam.

    TEXTS:

    Required:

  • Fuentes: Special Edition for University of Michigan; Coursepack; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
  • Fuentes: Activities Manual; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin))
  • Bluebook for Thematic Reaction Assignments

    Recommended:

  • Fuentes listening tapes (* If you wish to purchase the entire set of 6 cassettes you may do so in the bookstores. Otherwise, the 3 required cassettes are available in the LRC.)
  • English Grammar for Students of Spanish, Emily Spinelli (Olivia and Hill Press)
  • A good bilingual Spanish-English dictionary

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

    Elementary Language Courses

    Section 006 Literatura fantástica

    Instructor(s): Kimberly Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: Http://www-personal.umich.edu/~ksboys/

    This course will focus on the discussion and examination of fantastic literature and magical realism in contemporary Latin American literature. The principle objectives will be to develop an understanding of the origins, themes, methods, and purposes of fantastic literature through selected readings of literature and criticism. Texts will include short stories and a short novel by Carlos Fuentes, Julio Cortázar, Jorge Luis Borges, and others. Students will be required to purchase a course pack, a grammar reference text, and a reader. In addition to the focus on the development of fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, important functional aspects of language will also be addressed. Evaluations will be based on class participation, course exams, an oral exam, homework, in-class activities, and a final course portfolio. Special emphasis will be placed on writing and the writing process through reaction papers as well as analytic and creative compositions.

    TEXTS:

    Required:

  • De Paseo, Textbook, Long, Macián (Heinle)
  • De Paseo, Diario de actividades, Long, Macián (Heinle)

    Optional but highly recommended:

  • Side by Side: Spanish & English Grammar, Farrell (Passport Books)
  • A good bilingual Spanish-English dictionary

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

    Elementary Language Courses

    Section 011 Introduction to Hispanic Culture: North and Central America

    Instructor(s): Ivan Martinez (idmartin@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/spanish/232/011.nsf

    The goal of this course is to introduce participants to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world (Mexico and Central America Countries) by studying various aspects of its history, social issues/problems, current and past customs. The most important aim of the course is to provide participants with an experience with Hispanic culture that will give them a true sense of cultural understanding. At the same time, students will be exposed to the mayor communicative functions that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency, that is, participants will

    1. narrate and describe in the present, past, and future,
    2. express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past, and future events
    3. hypothesize about the future and present.

    The course is conducted entirely in Spanish. Various writing assignments are required, three exams, quizzes, oral examination, oral presentation, final paper, and final exam.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

    Elementary Language Courses

    Section 030-037 LATINO CULTURE THROUGH COMMUNITY SERVICE

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will be a query into the nature of the Hispanic community through the topic of culture. Not only will we be discussing Hispanic in a seminar setting, but we will be providing two hours a week of community service in after-school tutoring to the Hispanic community in southwest Detroit. The goals of this course, then, are two-fold, and encompass the objectives of both a service-learning course and a fourth-term Spanish language course. You will be exploring and "testing" different cultural understandings of service, including, and especially, your own. This course in not just about providing a service in terms of logging hours, but to go beyond, through analysis, reflection and evaluation to address the variety of needs of the Hispanic culture in our community.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

    Other Language Courses

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275 or 276. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s): Serafín M Coronel-Molina (scoronel@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275 or 276. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~scoronel/span270-links.html

    Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 275. Grammar and Composition.

    Other Language Courses

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/spanish/275/res.nsf

    Spanish 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 275. Grammar and Composition.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001, 003, 007.

    Instructor(s): Linda Leann Grabner-Coronel

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/spanish/275/001.nsf

    This is a transition course between elementary Spanish language classes and upper level classes for concentrators. For this reason, the class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

    The principal aim of the course is to review elements of Spanish grammar. Because it is expected that students will already have a fairly firm grasp of the mechanics of using the language, we will conduct our review from a less mechanically prescriptive and more linguistically theoretical perspective. Thus, by the end of the term, students will not only have reviewed *how* to manipulate the various elements of the language, but will also understand *why* those elements interact the way they do, and *what* can be accomplished by manipulating those elements in certain ways. Students will be able to meaningfully discuss basic issues of semantics, syntax and pragmatics, and apply their understanding to the analysis of written discourses.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 276. Reading and Composition.

    Other Language Courses

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/spanish/276/001.nsf

    Spanish 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

    Text:

  • Coursepack : Part 1 at Excel (1117 S. University) Part 2 will be prepared by the instructor

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001, 002.

    Instructor(s): Maria De Lourdes Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Business 305 is intended to increase the student's vocabulary and knowledge about the Spanish-speaking business world. Since the class is conducted in Spanish, students must have an understanding of the fundamentals of Spanish Grammar. The course will use authentic material, rely on group discussion, various readings, and exercises. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a project, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course will allow students to develop their Spanish business knowledge to be more effective in the business world.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

    Literature

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course introduces students to narrative fiction, poetry, drama, argumentative essays, and critical literature. It emphasizes the formal aspects of each genre, including appropriate terminology and analytical/interpretive approaches.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

    Literature

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s): Dennis Pollard (dennisdp@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/spanish/320/002.nsf

    In this course we will consider topics of literary study and methods of analysis, specifically of literature written in Spanish. We will examine three of the most commonly-taught literary genres, prose fiction, lyric poetry and theater. The discussion of each reading will focus on one or more specific aspects of literary style appropriate to the genre under consideration. The principal text for the course, Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, will be supplemented by other readings.

    The basic class format is discussion, with very few lectures, so regular attendance and participation will be crucial. Each student will complete several written projects on the three literary genres. Papers may be read and commented on by fellow students as well as by the instructor. Students will make presentations on readings during the semester and there will also be exams on the material covered.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

    Literature

    Section 003.

    Instructor(s): McKay John (jsmckay@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will introduce students to the study of literature in Spanish. This will involve reading different genres (short story, novel, biography, poetry and essays) as well as a consideration of different critical stances. We read fiction on the first level as entertaining stories. What, if anything, differentiates stories from other kinds of writing (essays, newspaper articles, history, science)? What sorts of critical tools can we use to begin an examination of these differences or similarities? The course will be divided into a series of sections that will examine different critical views or ways of reading and writing about (or discussing) literature. Students will be expected to produce a number of essays in which they begin to reflect on different ways of thinking about literature. Classes will be more seminar than lecture and will focus on discussion of different ways of thinking about literature and the ways it produces meaning. The course grade will be determined by a combination of participation, written assignments and exams.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 340. Introduction to Iberian Cultures.

    Literature

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Manuel Camarero

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course offers a reflection on contemporary Spain by examining historical, social, and artistic aspects of the Iberian Peninsula, with an emphasis on contemporary Spanish society through artworks, films, and popular music.

    Students will follow discussions in class on a variety of topics:

    History of Spain and Spanish art from Roman times up to today.
    Spanish popular music.
    Spanish cinema: from Luis Buñuel to Pedro Almodóvar.
    Spanish festivals and folklore today (Christmas, Fallas, Holy Week, bullfighting).
    Bilingualism in Spain: Basque, Catalonian, Galician, and Spanish.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 341. Introduction to Latin American Cultures.

    Literature

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): John McKay (jsmckay@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will examine various aspects of Latin American Culture focusing on its historical development from pre-Columbian times to present day through readings from the course text, El Espejo Enterrado, by Carlos Fuentes and other sources as well as videos and other materials. We say Latin America as a term that speaks some fundamental unity but Latin America can be understood most clearly as a region of great diversity or hybridity where different cultures, races, classes and interests have contended with each other. This often violent process of colonization is something that we in North America share with Latin America. We will look at the long history of colonization and how it leads to the present day situation. This will take place over a series of course sections that will include: 1) Introduction: hybridity in Spain, Latin America and U.S. (us); 2) The indigenous world and its colonization; 3) The early formation of an "American" Identity 4) Neocolonialism, US-LA relations, Cuba, migration; 5) The struggle for independence in LA; and, 6) Border and US-Latino culture. The course grade will be determined by a combination of participation, written assignments and exams.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 372. Survey of Spanish Literature, II.

    Literature

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Andrew A Anderson (andander@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The late eighteenth-century and the 1930s mark the two extremes of the period represented in this survey of modern Spanish literature. The course will thus lay a good historical foundation for further Spanish courses and for comparisons to readings from other literatures. Essays, plays, poems and novels are analyzed as individual works for the beginning student, methods and approaches of literary criticism are considered, and an effort is made to show how the works exemplify their cultural context, ranging from the Enlightenment through Romanticism, Positivism, Generation of '98 to Symbolism. Representative authors who may be studied are Moratín, Larra, Bécquer, Galdós, Azorín, Unamuno and Lorca. The class format is basically recitation, but lectures and reports will also be used. Exercises consist of three sets of papers spread throughout the academic term. The course is conducted in Spanish.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

    Literature

    Section 001 Cultural and Literary Spain of the 1980's. The years of the movida.

    Instructor(s): Astrid Billat (abillat@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    With the death of Dictator Francisco Franco in 1975, Spain underwent numerous political and sociocultural changes. In this course, we will explore the literary and cultural life of Spain and especially in Madrid during the 1980's, also known as the years of the movida.

    We will analyze this period from various perspectives:

    • the study of Spanish films (mostly by the famous filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar)
    • the study of texts (literary and popular) representative of the movida.
    • the study of the musical production of this decade.
    • the study of the artistic production.
    • (This list might be modified)

    In this course, daily participation is very important. The discussions and readings (for the most part) will be in Spanish, as well as examinations and papers. In addition to offering the student the opportunity to learn more about Post-Franco Spain, this course through readings, written assignments and daily class discussions will give the student the opportunity to strengthen his/her reading, writing and speaking skills in Spanish.

    As for evaluation goes, there will be a participation grade, midterm and final exams, a final paper (10 pages), short papers (1-2 pages), as well as various home/in class works

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 380/Amer. Cult. 380/Film-Video 380. Studies in Transnational Media.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in Film and Video Studies, Communications (television studies) or Latino Studies. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Globalization has deeply affected the ways in which we use media to construct our social world, as well as the ways in which audiovisual media are designed, produced, and transmitted. This course will examine films, television programs, and community-based videotapes that reflect the global movement of ideas, talent, production capital, cultural forms, and people, in their mode of transmission, style, and content. Along with the economic, technological, and political factors shaping the production and distribution of these media, we will be reviewing critical concepts useful to understanding the complexities of media products as texts, including their reception by diverse audiences. Emphasis will be given to film co-productions and television flows in the Spanish-and Portuguese-speaking world, especially soap operas and media produced by indigenous peoples in the hemisphere. Weekly screenings, media diaries, midterm, group research project, and final paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 382. Survey of Latin American Literature, II.

    Literature

    Section 001 Survey of Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature

    Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course examines the main literary and cultural trends in twentieth-century Latin American poetry, prose, and theater. Students will become familiar with the socio-historical contexts (the emergence of the modern state, revolutions in Mexico and Central America, military uprisings, new democracies in Latin America) in which major authors of this century produce their works. In the first part of the course, we will read works produced before 1960 (texts by Rulfo, Mistral, Quiroga, Henríquez Ureña, Mariátegui, Guillén, Borges, etc.) and will study the following literary trends: narrativas de la revolución mexicana, poesía modernista, indigenismo, and avant-garde poetry. The second half of the course will focus on the literary production of the "Boom" writers (1960-75) and their influence on writers of the 1970s and 1980s (works by Castellanos, Fuentes, García Márquez, Poniatowska, Ferré, etc.). [This course completes the panoramic view of Latin American literature presented in Spanish 381.]

    Textbooks:

    Chang-Rodríguez, Raquel. Voces de Hispanoamérica
    Skidmore, Thomas. Modern Latin America
    Burns, Bradford E. Latin America: A Concise Interpretive History

    Course Requirements: Classwork (20%), Bi-weekly reports (20%), Three Quizzes (30%), Three Short Essays (30%).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 392. Junior Honors Course.

    Literature

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    SPANISH 410/Rom. Ling. 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. Spanish 405 is strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments and a final paper. Course is conducted in Spanish.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 420/Amer. Cult. 420. Latin American & Latino/a Film Studies.

    Literature

    Section 001 Latino/as in U.S. film and television.

    Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 270 or 275. A previous course in Film & Video, or Latin American history, or Latino Studies. (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Credits: (4).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Comparative survey of historical and theoretical developments in Latin American and Latino/a audiovisual media, with an emphasis on the cinema. This term will be devoted to issues surrounding Latino/a representation in U.S. audiovisual media, such as Hollywood's treatment of race and gender, casting practices, funding structures, changing audience demographics, the legacy of Latino/a stereotyping, and community access to participation and decisionmaking within and outside of the production process. A broad range of media texts will be analyzed, from World War II "Good Neighbor" musicals to recent "cross-over" and experimental works written, produced, and directed by Latino/as. Three central questions will inform the course: (1) what possible meanings does the distinction between "mainstream" and "independent" media hold for Latino/a performers, directors, and viewers? (2) how has the construction of the Latino/a image on the screen been inflected by the politics surrounding the representation of other ethnic groups? (3) are there historical and methodological reasons for treating Latino/as as a cohesive group when analyzing U.S. media? Weekly evening screenings are required. Quiz, response papers, group discussions, final take-home exam.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 432. Gender, Writing, and Culture.

    Literature

    Section 001 Spanish Women Narrative of the Post-Franco Era (1975-present)

    Instructor(s): Astrid A Billat (abillat@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    With the death of Dictator Francisco Franco in 1975, Spain underwent numerous political and sociocultural changes. Among those changes is the greater freedom for women, a phenomenon which is addressed in many ways in the literary production of the end of 1970's, the 80's and 90's. In this course we will explore such narrative.

    We will read works by the following authors: Almudena Grandes, Cristina Fernández Cubas, Mercedes Abad, Concha Alós, Josefina Aldecoa, Carmen Riera, Clara Janés, Soledad Puértolas, Ana María Moix, Laura Freixas y Pilar Pedraza. (this list might be modified).

    This course will offer the student the opportunity to acquire the necessary tools in order to analyze a narrative. Moreover, through readings, written assignments and daily class discussions, the student will be able to strengthen his/her reading, writing and speaking skills in Spanish.

    The student will be evaluated on the following work:

    Daily participation 15%
    Midterm exam 25%
    Final exam 25%
    In class/homeworks/short papers (1-2 pages) 15%
    Final paper 20%

    The course, as well as all exams and papers, will be entirely in Spanish (reading, writing and speaking).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

    Literature

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    SPANISH 437. Introduction to Literature Studies and Criticism.

    Literature

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Santiago Colás (scolas@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    What do literary critics do? What have they done? What can they do? How is studying literature (being part of Literary Studies) different, or not, than reading literature? What's the relationship between a practice called "criticism" and a feeling called "pleasure"? How about between that practice and unpleasure? How can writing communicate the experience of reading? What's the connection between criticism and creativity? Who cares about literary criticism anyway? And why should they? In this course, we will explore these questions via a series of readings of fiction, literary criticism, and literary theory. Students should emerge from the course with: (1) an elementary understanding of the variety of practices that may constitute literary criticism as a practice; (2) an introductory glimpse into the various institutional forces that help determine what gets called literary criticism; (3) exposure to the assumptions, habits, feelings, and values of critical thinking. A great deal of writing will be required in the course, particularly in the form of regular short essays. The course will be conducted in English.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 448. Hispanic Culture Through Community Service Learning.

    Literature

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Christina Jose-Kampfner

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 300-level Spanish course. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    SPANISH 456. Golden Age.

    Literature

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    El presente curso estudiará una serie de textos canónicos desde una perspectiva contemporánea, enfatizando su contextualización socio-política, histórica y literaria, además de nuevos acercamientos que se adapten a la sensibilidad moderna. Se analizará poesía, teatro y narrativa, en un diseño cronológico que prestará atención cuestiones como el "yo" poético en su transición del Renacimiento al Barroco, la creación de una dramaturgia nacional de sabor autóctono, y la inauguración de nuevos modos narrativos como la picaresca o la novela corta. Los autores a estudiar serán Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Jesús, San Juan de la Cruz, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Góngora, Tirso de Molina, Quevedo y Calderón de la Barca. La clase será en español.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 464. Spanish Romanticism.

    Literature

    Section 001 Representations of Woman in Spanish Romanticism

    Instructor(s): Manuel Camarero

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course offers a reflection on representations of woman in Spanish Romanticism by examining representative works of Spanish Romantic literature.

    Students will follow discussions in class on a variety of topics:

    Towards a typology of representations of woman: types and archetypes.
    The misogynist representation (Mesonero Romanos, Larra).
    The erotic representation: sexuality, sexism, and voyeurism (Espronceda, Estébanez Calderón).
    The idealization of woman (Gil y Carrasco, Zorrilla).
    The sensible/sensitive woman (Gómez de Avellaneda, Coronado).
    Man-made/woman-made representations (Fernán Caballero).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries.

    Literature

    Section 001 Colonial satire

    Instructor(s): Maria Soledad Barbon (mbarbon@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Almost right from the beginning of the conquest of the New World we encounter politically and societally critical forms of literary expression in the form of satires, the earliest being verses scribbled on the walls of the palaces of the conquistadores Cortés and Pizarro.

    This course aims at giving an overview of such writings in the Viceroyalty of Peru from the sixteenth up to the end of the eighteenth century by concentrating on three major satirists as well as introducing students to the theory of satire. Starting with the more playful satire of the Spaniard Mateo Rosas de Oquendo (Sátira hecha por Mateo Rosas de Oquendo a las cosas que pasan en el Pirú año de 1598 ) we will move to the biting satirical poetry of authors such as Juan del Valle y Caviedes (1651-97) and Esteban Terralla y Landa (Lima por dentro y por fuera, 1797).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century.

    Literature

    Section 001 The Latin-American Best-Seller.

    Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Are best-sellers "bad literature"? Should the academy examine and study best-sellers? Why so many Latin American novels have become best-sellers in the last 30 years? Do best-sellers belong in the academic curriculum? To answer these questions, this course examines the "old" and "new" publishing trends in Latin American literature through a genealogy of the Latin American best-seller novel. In our readings, we will study the international success and recognition of the works of Gabriel García Márquez and Manuel Puig in the 1960s and 1970s as well as the more recently "acclaimed" works of Isabel Allende, Laura Esquivel, Zoé Valdés, Jaime Bayly and Eliseo Alberto.

    Tentative Reading List:
    García Márquez, Gabriel. Cien años de soledad (1967)
    Puig, Manuel. El beso de la mujer araña (1976)
    Allende, Isabel. La casa de los espíritus (1982)
    Esquivel, Laura. Como agua para chocolate (1989)
    Alberto, Eliseo. Caracol Beach (1998)

    Course Requirements: Classwork (20%), Presentations and Oral Reports (20%), 5 Papers (60%).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century.

    Literature

    Section 002 Cuban Personal and National Performance

    Instructor(s): Lucía M Suárez (suarez@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course, we will engage in an intensive analysis of the historical events, intersecting ideological narratives, cinematic presentations, political evolution, and personal experiences that create a contemporary Cuban and Cuban-American identity.

    Particular attention will be paid to the "politics of writing." What narratives shape our visions of Cuban society, history and mythology? What role do writers play in that narrative construction? How has the autobiographical and confessional become a central mode of communication in Cuban literature and film?

    We will read two texts from the nineteenth century in order to better understand the trajectory of the nation between Spanish colony and revolutionary state. This class is conducted in Spanish.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

    Literature

    Section 001 Experiments in 20C Theater.

    Instructor(s): Andrew A Anderson (andander@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will be concerned with the different ways in which several twentieth-century Spanish playwrights sought to change, reform, subvert or destroy the realistic/naturalistic norm that they had inherited. We shall read plays by Valle-Inclán, García Lorca, Alberti and Buero Vallejo, among others, and in each instance we shall be considering the ways in which the texts depart from the norm, particularly as regards the difficulties of staging them in a theater and the innovations in production values and techniques that the plays thereby require of the director and stage designer. There will be several in-class projects and three written papers. All readings and class discussion in Spanish.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

    Literature

    Section 002 HISPANIOLA: ONE ISLAND, TWO NATIONS

    Instructor(s): Lucía M Suárez (suarez@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this class we will examine the production of Dominican literature in relationship to Dominican-American (Latina/o) writing; and Haitian literature with respect to the literary production of the Haitian diaspora. We will investigate how the Trujillo and Duvalier dictatorships shaped discourses of nationality, ethnicity and race, and how these, in turn, stimulated a consequent literary reaction.

    Fictional texts such as Julia Álvarez's In the Time of the Butterflies and Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, have brought international attention to the poverty stricken region of Hispaniola. Mario Vargas Llosa's recent novel, La fiesta del chivo situates the Trujillo dictatorship among the chain of Latin American dictators of the twentieth century. In contrast Stephen Alexis' work points to the beginnings of Haitian nationalism as an exemplary model of independence gone awry. This region of intense violence and trauma is sculpted not by the silence and fear that it often witnesses, but rather, by courageous writers in exile. We will explore the meaning of writing fiction and its use as a tool of testimony.

    This class is reading intensive. It will be conducted in Spanish. If any students read in French, recommendations for work not in translation will be made.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

    Literature

    Section 001 Popular literary consciousness in narrative and drama.

    Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will study three Latin American novels written between 1900 and 1950. These novels (Jorge Icaza's Huasipungo, Ciro Alegría's El mundo es ancho y ajeno, and Nicomedes Guzman's La sangre y la esperanza), as well as important theatrical pieces such as Rodolfo Usigli's El gesticulador, appear in a historical period when Latin America moves from the expansion of export-import growth (1900-1930) into the import-substituting industrialization (1930-1950s). By shifting from the literary into the socio-historical development of Latin America throughout the first half of the twentieth century, this course will focus on how literature registers in novels and in theater the creation of multiclass "populist" alliances. The course will also relate narrative and drama with some key essays of the period, such as José Vasconcelos' Raza cósmica and José Carlos Mariátegui's Siete ensayos de interpretación de la realidad peruana.

    Students taking this course should be motivated to study literature from economic and sociopolitical points of view. Students are expected to participate very actively in class discussions. Students will take a midterm exam and will have a final take-home.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

    Literature

    Section 002 Crónicas andinas

    Instructor(s): Maria Soledad Barbon (mbarbon@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The aim of this course is to explore different Andean voices on the Spanish conquest and the Inca past. We will start by examining the Ynstrucción del Ynga don Diego de Castro Titu Cusi Yupangui para el muy ilustre señor el Licencidao Lope García de Castro (1570) by Titu Cusi Yupanqui, a testimony of the Spanish conquest which was first dictated in Quechua and then translated into Spanish by an Augustinian friar.

    We will then turn to the works of two major Andean chroniclers: the description of colonial life in the Viceroyalty of Peru in the illustrated Nueva corónica y buen gobierno (1615) by Guaman Poma de Ayala and the Comentarios Reales de los Incas (1609) by the Inca Garcilaso de la Vega whose purpose was to recover the history and culture of the Incas.

    We will focus on the argumentative structure of these texts, the historical and historiographical context in which they were produced and the polemics in which they engage.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism.

    Literature

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level Spanish literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    SPANISH 491. Senior Honors Course.

    Literature

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Supervised independent studies and a program of selected readings including conferences, term papers or reports, and written examinations.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    Graduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


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