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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in University Courses

This page was created at 7:25 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in University Courses
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for UC

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for University Courses.


University Courses are sponsored by the College or University rather than by individual departments or programs and may be taught by members of the faculty in any academic unit on the Ann Arbor campus. The College offers as University Courses both full-term courses and mini-courses.

The University Courses Division sponsors a number of First-Year Seminars (UC 150, 151, 152, 153) that provide a unique small-class educational experience open to all first-year students. (A complete list of seminars offered this term by the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts can be found in the first section of this Course Guide.) These seminars are taught on a variety of topics by regular and emeritus faculty from many different departments. The small-class size (approximately 18-20 students) facilitates deeper learning through more active participation and increased opportunities for interaction between student and teacher as well as dialogue among students. First-Year Seminars provide a stimulating introduction to the intellectual life of the University by exposing new students to engaging subject matter; some may discover a subject to pursue in further courses. It is hoped that students who take a seminar will find in it a sense of intellectual and social community that will ease the transition to a large university.

All First-Year Seminars can be used to complete part of the College's general requirements. UC 153 meets the Introductory Composition requirement. Other seminars count toward satisfying the Area Distribution requirements: Humanities (UC 150); Social Sciences (UC 151); Natural Sciences (UC 152), Quantitative Reasoning or Race & Ethnicity.

The University Courses Division occasionally offers Collegiate Seminars, open to any student who has completed the Introductory Composition requirement. Intended especially for lower-division students and taught by regular professorial faculty members, Collegiate Seminars provide additional opportunities for first- and second-year students to personalize their education through a small-group course.

All Collegiate Seminars count toward satisfaction of the College's Area Distribution requirements in one of the three major divisions: Humanities (UC 250); Social Sciences (UC 251); Natural Sciences (UC 252). All emphasize critical thinking about important and central topics and feature further instruction in writing.

University mini-courses are one-credit, special interest offerings that center upon a conference, group of lectures, or special exhibit, appear on short notice in a term, and are usually of 2-to-8-weeks duration. Mini-courses are offered mandatory credit/no credit and are normally excluded from area distribution and concentration credits. Information about upcoming UC mini-courses is available by dialing POINT 10 (764-6810). No more than two University mini-courses may be elected in one term.


UC 103. Michigan Community Scholars Program: Academic Decision Making.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Penny A Pasque (pasque@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the Michigan Community Scholars Program. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with an opportunity to critically review the roles of leadership and decision making as they relate to their academic and professional careers. It will allow students to consider various frameworks of decision making and leadership through various theoretical perspectives and link them to civic responsibility and social change. It is hoped that students will develop a sense of application of one or more of these perspectives and consider how they might shape their own academic, professional, and community leadership careers. The issues and challenges of living and leading in a multicultural society will be examined. The class discussions will focus on relevant research, student perceptions, and university resources. This course is open only to participants in the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 111/Soc. 111/AOSS 172/NR&E 111. Introduction to Global Change II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J David Allan, Mary Anne Carroll

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.sprl.umich.edu/GCL/

Course E-mail: globalchange@umich.edu

Instructors:
David Allan SNRE
Richard Ford Anthropology
Gayl Ness Sociology
Lisa Curran SNRE/Biology
Mary Anne Carroll AOSS/Chemistry
Vincent Abreu AOSS
Ben van der Pluijm Geology

Global environmental change encompasses the rapid changes now occurring in the Earth as a system its climate, human population, natural resources, and ecosystems. Global Change II Human Impacts guides students in learning about the natural world and the role of human activities in shaping and changing the environment.

Global Change II is an interdisciplinary, team-taught and web-based introduction to the human dimensions of global change. You will study the recent, explosive growth of the human population, and our impacts on land, air, and water resources and on biological diversity, produced by recent human advances in technology and institutions. The course concludes by considering the political and policy considerations relevant to the transition to a more sustainable future.

Global Change II is appropriate for all students and assumes no prior background. It can be taken without prior enrollment in Global Change I. Homework and laboratories make extensive use of computers to perform spatial analysis, develop quantitative reasoning, help students learn to write critically, and promote personal interaction with the faculty.

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab/discussion per week. Grades will be based on weekly written lab exercises, a poster project, midterms, and final exam.

In Global Change II you will learn about:

  1. Human Population Growth
    • Its History and Social Influences
  2. Detection of Global Environmental Change
    • Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems
  3. Human Impacts on Resources
    • Human Appropriation of the Earth's Energy, Water and Food Resources
    • Urban and Industrial Environments
    • Deforestation and Desertification
    • Biodiversity
  4. Achieving Sustainable Development
    • Economics of Development
    • International Treaties and Government
  5. Our Common Future
    • Models of the Future
    • Role of Culture,Technology and the Individual
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 001 Of What Is Man Capable?

Instructor(s): Edward M Shafter Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The English novelist, Somerset Maugham, once observed, "He who thinks he knows what a man is capable of is a fool." Through the engaging world of imaginative literature you will be introduced to a range of vivid personalities who behave in ways not only admirable and reassuring but also revolting and perplexing. You will be drawn to Willy Loman (Death of a Salesman ) and the lengths to which he will go to sustain his self-image. You will be fascinated by Raskolnikov (Crime and Punishment ) who plans to murder an old woman pawnbroker for the purpose of social good. Too, you will meet Fitzgerald's Jay Gatsby whose unwavering confidence that he can recapture a past romance produces unexpected and violent consequences. Finally, you will be shocked and confused by the seeming bizarre behavior of Meursault (The Stranger ) who is doomed to execution because he failed to cry at his mother's funeral.

  1. The course objective is to increase your understanding not only of the awesome range and engrossing character of human behavior but also of the complex, often baffling, motivation behind that behavior.
  2. Since the course format is discussion rather than lecture, you are expected to prepare assignments carefully so that you can contribute orally at each class session. Study questions are distributed for each work; they will help guide and focus both the individual reading and class discussion.
  3. Class attendance is required-absences may lower your course grade.
  4. Three papers are assigned, 3-4 pages each. Due dates appear on the Course Schedule.
    • Theme 1 is based on The Great Gatsby or Crime and Punishment .
    • Theme 2 is based on Death of a Salesman, Night, The Painted Bird, or The Stranger .
    • Theme 3 is based on Black Boy, Poe stories, The Things They Carried, or In Cold Blood.

    You select a topic, define a thesis, and develop that thesis clearly and logically, basing it appropriately and credibly on the literature you are working with. Keep in mind the value of apt specific detail to clarify and reinforce main ideas, and thus enhance the general interest level of your paper.
    For each paper, formulate a title, and in the upper right-hand corner of the first page place your name, date, and number of paper.
  5. You course grade will be determined primarily by the quality of writing. Regular participation in discussion will be the factor used to resolve any question regarding which of two possible grades should be the course grade. Over the term, a pattern of improvement in your general performance, both written and oral, will weigh heavily in your favor.
  6. There will be an essay final examination.

The following books are required for the course: Camus The Stranger (Vintage), Capote In Cold Blood (Vintage), Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment (Bantam), Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby (Scribner's Paperback), Kosinski The Painted Bird (Grove Press), Miller Death of a Salesman (Penguin), O'Brien The Things They Carried (Broadway Books), Poe The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Writings (Bantam), Quindlen One True Thing (Dell), Wiesel Night (Bantam), Wright Black Boy (Perennial Classics).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 002 Visual Culture Studies.

Instructor(s): Joanne Leonard (joannell@umich.edu), Kristin A Haas (kah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~irwg/newsletter/visual.html

This course will ask undergraduates to think about the ordinary images in their daily lives as significant sites of cultural meaning. We will ask them to recognize and to hone the analytical tools they have for understanding the visual and we will ask them to cull new ones from scholarship in Visual Culture. Students will respond with both written and visual projects.

We are living in a material and, an increasingly, visual world. Every image you see and every object you touch is shot-through with powerful cultural ideologies ideas about power and gender and race and class and place and nation shape our visual and material world. In this class we will dive into the work of thinking about the images and objects in our daily lives as puzzles full of meanings for us to explore and unpack. Students will be asked to think about how photographs, maps, paintings, graffiti, architecture, fashions, monuments, billboards, museums, movies, videos and more as fundamental elements of our visual and material world construct and convey meaning. Students will be asked to think about ubiquitous visual and material signs as sites of essential of cultural knowledge. They will be asked to develop analytic tools for understanding these signs and to create, in response, some signs of their own.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 003 Understanding Dramatic Script.

Instructor(s): William D Weinberg (weinbrg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will examine the dramatic structure of the script. Focusing primarily on the screenplay, we will investigate a variety of important subjects, including: the presentation of a message through dramatic means; the arc of traditional narrative; the construction of character; and the representation of inner life through external dialogue. We also will explore the broader implications of such a study both for a more complex understanding of politics and psychology, and for a better awareness of the structure of other forms of writing. This is a demanding but lively course: students are expected to participate actively in discussion and work in groups outside of class hours. As a final project, students will write their own scripts that incorporate the lessons of this course. Students must be available MW 6:30-8:30 pm for a total of approx. 7 required film screenings throughout the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 004 Music in Our Lives.

Instructor(s): Louis Nagel (julou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will focus on how people listen to music and music's impact on communities of people who listen to it. In the first weeks of the course students will learn how to listen to music and explore the interaction of different elements of music, such as rhythm, melody, harmony, etc. As we begin to listen to a wider range of music, we will explore the impact of music in cases such as the Paris riot of 1913 following the performance of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or the reaction of King George to the "Hallelujah Chorus" at the conclusion of Handel's "Messiah." We will consider the impact of popular music, religious music, and the band as examples of how music has reached out into all types of communities. Students will attend three musical events and write reviews of each based on concepts explored in class. The professor will present and perform numerous examples of music on the piano, there will be invited soloists and chamber ensembles, and students who wish may share their musical talents in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 005 Why Read Canadian Fiction?

Instructor(s): Lyall Powers (lhpowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will read and discuss a variety of Canadian texts (novels and short stories) written during the last 50 years or so. We will consider what is Canadian about them, whether they are like American fiction, what they can tell us about ourselves as well as about Canadians (their customs, problems, and beliefs, and their possibly our lives and loves), and how good they are (what is a good novel?).

Texts:

  • Sinclair Ross' novel about drought and depression the Canadian prairies, As For Me and My House (1941) a little like the The Grapes of Wrath
  • W.O. Mitchell's novel about boyhood a second cousin of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Who Has Seen the Wind? (1943);
  • Ethel Wilson's short novel Hetty Dorval something of Canadian Becky Sharp (1947)
  • Timothy Findley's novel The Last of the Crazy People (1967) maybe comparable to The Catcher in the Rye
  • a selection of Mavis Gallant's short stories (from The New Yorker)
  • Margaret Laurence's A Bird in the House (1970), which look like a collection of short stories in Manitoba, but is more nearly a novel like Joyce's Dubliners or Hemingway's In Our Time (perhaps his best book) or Faulkner's Go Down, Moses (ditto).

Students will write 2 or 3 short papers, give 1 or 2 oral reports, take a final exam or write a term paper or both (an option). The final grade will be determined by performance in those exercises and participation in class discussion. No credit for attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 001 Why Grandpa Went to War: The Psychology of Obedience & Drives Toward World War.

Instructor(s): Donald R Brown (donrobro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What were the social, economic, geopolitical, and personal psychological conditions in 1942 that would result in an 18-year-old freshman leaving college and going off to spend the next three years fighting with the U.S. Army in Europe and liberating Dachau? What led up to 1942 and how did these series of historical events become a part of the life of American youth and continue to affect that generation's (your grandparents) behavior after World War II and through today? What do we know from thirty years of research on the nature of obedience that resulted in both self-sacrifice and the Holocaust? These questions will be explored using the resources of historical works, novels, films, and personal documents. Each student will interview a member of that generation, preferably a grandparent or surrogate, with armed services experience during the war, and write a psycho-history of their subject's experiences and its consequences for their lives and times.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 002 Public Education for Blacks and Other Minorities 1863-1954 and Beyond: An Historical and Legal Perspective.

Instructor(s): Warren G Palmer (palmerwg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of the seminar will be to trace the development of elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education of Blacks and other minorities in the South from the Emancipation Proclamation to May 17, 1954. Particular emphasis will be focused on watershed judicial litigation, from the Supreme Court decision of Plessy vs. Ferguson, from which the doctrine of "separate but equal" evolved, to the historic Brown vs.Topeka, Kansas Board of Education in 1954. Of special importance will be seminar discussions revealing how Blacks and other minorities were successful in achieving an education in spite of the barriers confronting them. Students will be expected to read a number of the classic writings by authors such as W.E.B. DuBois, E. Franklin Frazier, Booker T. Washington, and John Hope Franklin. The writings of contemporary Blacks and minorities will be explored as well as books such as Gunner Myrdal's An American Dilemma. Students will be expected to prepare readings, participate in seminar discussions, and develop a research topic, preferably centered upon one of the Southern states under investigation in the seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 003 Medicine and the Media from Hippocrates Through ER.

Instructor(s): Raymond Hobbs (rhobbs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will study the development of medicine as a science and how its perception has changed through the media. Students will explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The Citadel, Intern and The House of God, and movies and television series such as The Hospital, Marcus Welby M.D., Saint Elsewhere and ER. Much of the course will focus on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of the students' own beliefs about medicine in the 21st century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 005 Environment, Sustainability, and Social Change.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this seminar is to begin to understand, at both the global and local levels, emerging responses to major problems resulting from unprecedented environmental changes. Initiatives to achieve future sustainability will be the focus of the seminar.

We will begin with a multidisciplinary examination of global environmental and related social changes. Focus will be on the needs of humans and other life forms, including the biophysical conditions on which life depends. Interconnections between the natural environment and social and cultural systems will be emphasized. To help develop a "global" perspective, we will identify implications of these changes for local communities, particularly in the U.S.A.

By critically examining the multiple meanings of "sustainable development" and "sustainability" and related practices, the seminar will learn about the emerging choices and actions for change. Emphasis will be on changes being pursued by communities, organizations, and individuals in response to growing perceptions of the unsustainability of established values and behaviors. Also, we will examine our own lifestyles in relation to achieving greater sustainability.

To understand initiatives to achieve greater sustainability in local geographical communities, we will study the topics of sustainable consumption, land use, food security and agriculture, materials use, and business and economy. Discussions of these topics will draw upon print and electronic resources, presentations by guest practitioners, and community based experiences of the seminar's members. Readings will come from a wide range of publications including core books of readings by different authors (e.g., People, Land and Community, Vital Signs 1999, and Eco-Pioneers ) and articles from a variety of journals (e.g., The Futurist, Science, Resurgence, Harvard Business Review, and Co-op Quarterly.)

Seminar members over the course of the academic term will select and complete a project of their choice. Each seminar member will be expected to involve herself/himself in relevant learning activities of their choice beyond the seminar and within the University as well as the surrounding community. If they choose to, students will have the opportunity to pursue and integrate into their seminar work service learning experiences related to the pursuit of sustainability. Information and other learning from these involvements will be incorporated in the seminar.

Writing assignments will include options for individual choice and utilize the forms of a journal and integrative essays expressed as op-ed articles, short research papers directed to different audiences, news articles, and book reviews. Essential parts of the seminar learning process will include thorough preparation for discussions and active participation in presenting and discussing ideas as well as in actively listening and responding to other seminar members. Assignments will be mostly individual but some will involve groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 006 Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships.

Instructor(s): Allen Menlo (almenlo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to assist members toward an understanding of the personal and situational forces that help and hinder persons in their relationships with each other and in their efforts to work and live together. It will also assist members to transform these social psychological understandings into constructive actions for handling the problems and difficulties that inevitably arise when people are together. There will be opportunity to refine one's competencies at reflective listening, giving and seeking feedback, interpersonal observation, and mindfulness in thinking about issues. The class sessions are interactive and informal with brief information-giving, focused discussions, interpersonal learning exercises, and videotapes. Reading assignments are mainly through course handouts and other suggested sources. To stimulate personal reflection on interpersonal issues, class members maintain an observation log and a reading log and do a term paper on a relevant, self-selected topic. This work is also used as the source of evaluation and grading in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 009 Human Sexuality and Gender Issues.

Instructor(s): Frances L Mayes (frnmayes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Issues of human sexuality and gender are explored from many perspectivesincluding historical, cross-cultural, religious, and physiological. All people are sexual all their lives, although the expression of our sex and gender is one of the most diverse and controversial areas in personal and public arenas. The diversities of biological sex, gender identity, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual identity, and sexual behavior and the interplay among them are presented and reinforced through readings, exercises, videos, guest speakers, and weekly written assignments. We will discuss sexual difficulties such as infertility, STDs, sexual dysfunction, and sexual victimization along with prevention and treatment strategies. We will examine social and political issues such as civil rights for sexual minorities, sex and the law, date rape, pornography, the impact of AIDS, public and private morality, etc. Issues especially relevant for students are explored, including choice of sexual partners and behaviors, the influence of drugs, alcohol, and smoking on sexual function and sexual decision-making, sexual values and religious attitudes toward sex, and the wide range of possible lifestyles from celibacy to polyamory to paraphilias. The course requires access to the Internet and uses of a variety of Web-based resources and communication modes, as well as a textbook and readings from various journals. Weekly short papers and a term project are required. Opportunities for help with developing presentation skills are available.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 202/Aerospace Science 202. U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power.

Section.

Prerequisites & Distribution: UC 201. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


UC 210. Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care.

Instructor(s): Frances B Zorn (franzorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for students considering a career in a health profession. It is designed to help them acquire perspectives to facilitate their decision-making process. Health care professionals visit the class and share their educational and professional experiences. Students become acquainted with the prerequisites for professional and graduate schools and spend time with dental, medical, osteopathic, nursing, and public health students. We consider problems facing the health professions in the 21st century: problems of health care delivery; the high cost of medical care and prescription drugs, and the effects on the uninsured (43 million plus people) and the underinsured. We discuss issues related to malpractice and death and dying. Students are expected to respond in writing and in class to visitors, to reading materials, and to films. A course pack containing the syllabus and W;T (yes, that is spelled correctly) by Margaret Edson are the text materials required. All students are responsible for taking definite steps toward the development of their own goals through a self-inventory of their values, skills, and interests, and through a term paper exploring a possible career direction. Evaluation is based on class attendance and participation in discussions and the completion of all reading and participation in discussions and the completion of all reading and writing assignments. Interested students must contact the instructor or a CSP counselor at CSP, G 155 Angell to receive an override. The class meets on-campus Monday 3-5 and on Thursday 7-9:30 p.m. at 2130 Dorset Rd, Ann Arbor. Dorset Rd. is about a mile from campus. A map showing the location of will be available at CSP. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the first Thursday evening session, when rides will be arranged for the remainder of the term. Student who will have conflicts with the Thursday evening meeting should not enroll in the class for the work we do on Thursday evening is essential to the successful completion of the course work and is not available in a text book.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

UC 280. Undergraduate Research-A (Grade).

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gregerman (sgreger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First or second year standing, and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). A maximum of eight credits of UC 280 and 281 may be counted toward graduation.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP sponsored activities, including bimonthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

UC 300. College Practicum.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students may petition the College Board of Study to receive academic credit for an activity not covered by one of the departmental experiential courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

UC 313. Community Projects in the Arts and Humanities II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Scobey (scobey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students in UC 312 will pursue community projects in the arts, humanities, and design. Working with the UM Arts of Citizenship Program, student teams will collaborate with community partners on such projects as public art, park design, community history exhibits, and K-12 school curricula. In addition to these collaborations, students will use the weekly class meeting to connect their community practice to readings and writings about public cultural analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 313. Community Projects in the Arts and Humanities II.

Section 002 Community Collaboration: The Hallelujah Project

Instructor(s): David Scobey (scobey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students in UC 313 will pursue community projects in the arts, humanities, and design. Working with the UM Arts of Citizenship Program, students will collaborate with Detroit Educational, Cultural, and Arts Partners, The University Musical Society, and Dance and Liberal Arts faculty on a project that uses writing, dance, and community service. In addition to this collaborative performance project, students will use the course to connect their community practice to readings and writings about public culture. No previous expertise is required, only an interest in using the arts and humanities to enrich public life.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 402/Military Science 402. Military Professionalism and Professional Ethics.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Lucier (clucier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of MOEP chair. (2). (Excl).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/milsci/402/001.nsf

Through lecture, discussion, and case studies, you will build on your knowledge of how to lead and manage complex organizations by focusing on the moral, ethical, and legal aspects of being a leader in the US Army. This is an interdisciplinary course where we will integrate history, political science, ethics and morality, law and leadership. We will first examine and discuss the historical and constitutional basis for an Army, civilian control over the military through Congress and the National Command Authority, and the roles and missions of various branches of the US Armed Forces as instruments of national power. These lessons serve as the foundation to begin discussing how professional obligations, and national, organizational, and personal values, affect our role in society and our exercise of leadership. We will then examine the Just War tradition and discuss the morality of war and morality in war. We will utilize the ethical and moral structure from our previous lessons to discuss how leaders establish and reinforce an ethical organizational climate and utilize the ethical decision making process. Lastly, we will transition to a study of military law and the established Army regulations governing sexual harassment, equal opportunity, fraternization and environmental stewardship.

CONTENT OUTCOMES.

  1. Expand your knowledge of how to lead and manage complex organizations.
  2. Understand the moral and ethical standards of the military profession, and develop your own ethical code.
  3. Learn how to establish an ethical climate and go through the ethical decision-making process.
  4. Understand the basis and use of military law, and the regulations that help establish and reinforce an ethical climate.

TEXTS:

  1. War, Morality, and the Military Profession, Malham M. Wakin, ed. Westview Press, Boulder, CO, 1979 (distributed in class).
  2. Just War: Principles and Cases, Richard J. Regan, Catholic University Press, Washington D.C. 1996.
  3. Army Field Manual 22-100, Army Leadership.
  4. Manual for Courts-Martial United States (2000) for the military law lessons.
  5. I will distribute a course pack in class.

ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION.

  • Exam. There will be two exams worth 40% of your grade.
  • Written Assignments. There are two written assignments, Just War Essay worth 10% of your grade, Ethics essay, worth 30% of your grade.
  • In-class participation and attendance. Discussions and case studies will constitute the bulk or our in-class work. It is imperative that you read the assignments prior to class and that you are prepared to participate in the discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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