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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Humanities

This page was created at 7:28 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in RC Humanities
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for RCHUMS

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for RC Humanities.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.


RCHUMS 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week. Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 230. Biblical, Greek, and Medieval Texts: Original Works and Modern Counterparts.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we shall study foundational texts from the Greek, Old Testament, New Testament, and Medieval worlds and a number of modern works books, essays, and films that employ the themes and situations originally set forth in these classical works.

First, we shall examine literature central to the world view of four cultures that have helped shape and continue to inform modern Western consciousness and art. Our focus will be on questions and perspectives concerning the individual's relationship to the divine order, to earthly society, and to the private self that are embodied in such works as (I) Greek literature: Homer (The Iliad or The Odyssey); Sophocles (Oedipus, Antigone); Euripedes (Medea), Plato (Socratic dialogues); (II) Old Testament (Genesis, Job); (III): The New Testament (The Gospels of St. Matthew and St. John); (IV): Medieval literature: Dante's The Inferno, Gottfried's Tristan.

In conjunction with these works, we will examine, where feasible, modern counterparts (or adaptations or recreations) of the classic stories or conflicts found in these classical texts. We will read essays and novels, and see films which deal with the same or similar-and perennial-ideas and conflicts. (We will also examine those values and experiences expressed in the original works that seem alien to modern consciousness.) Some of the modern works we will scrutinize are Roman Polanski's Chinatown, Max Frisch's Homo Faber, Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ, Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal.

The chief merit of our approach, besides giving the student the opportunity to read and see important and exciting stories, is in the juxtaposing of the old and the new so as to make the student more appreciative of the rootedness in the past of many of our current ideas, problems, and situations.hief merit of our approach, besides giving the student the opportunity to read and see important and exciting stories, is in the juxtaposing of the old and the new so as to make the student more appreciative of the rootedness in the past of many of our current ideas, problems, and situations.

There will be two papers and a midterm and final exam. Reserve Wednesday evenings from 7-9:00 for the viewing of films.re will be two papers and a mid-semester and final exam. Reserve Wednesday evenings from 7-9:00 for the viewing of films.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 235. Topics in World Dance.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu), Jessica B Fogel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey a diversity of dance traditions throughout the world. The students will gain insight into the functions, aesthetics, history, and cultural context of dances within specific societies. Theatrical, religious, popular, and social dance traditions will be examined in a variety of cultures including groups in Africa, Japan, India, South America, Aboriginal Australia, Indonesia (Bali, Java), the Mideast, and others. A variety of broad comparative issues will be explored:

    How does dance reflect the values of the society which produces it?
  • How are gender, class, relationships between individual and group, as well as political and spiritual values displayed through dance structures and movements?
  • What is the creative process for producing these dance works?
  • How is the visual imagery of dance movement designed and how can an audience decipher it?
  • What are the basic elements of dance choreography?
  • How do choreographic structures differ cross-culturally?
  • How do the training, preparation, and performance practices of dancers differ cross-culturally?
  • How do the dances of these cultures employ or integrate other art forms such as music, theater, and costume design?
  • How are dance productions evaluated and critiqued within different cultures?

In addition to lectures and readings, the class will feature several guest artist/speaker presentations, viewings of films and videos, and observations of dance rehearsals, classes, and performances.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 242. Creative Adaptation: Fact Into Fantasy.

Creative Writing

Section 001 Creative Non-Fiction.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~balducci/creative_adaptation.html

Creative non-fiction is information-based writing for general audiences. Free-lance writers, journalists, and technical writers are assigned to write, translate, interpret, or edit texts which explain or describe specialized subjects in ordinary language that non-specialists can understand. These assignments can range from advertisements and news reports to articles aimed at more sophisticated readers in periodicals such as The New Yorker. Even semi-specialized publications such as Scientific American, Car and Driver, and the New England Journal of Medicine use non-technical language which informed amateurs as well as professionals can comprehend. In classical literature, works such as The Odyssey, MacBeth, The Aeneid, and The Divine Comedy were inspired by historical events and figures. Gettysburg, Joy Luck Club, and Age of Innocence are recent films which were adapted from historical or literary sources. Aladdin and Beauty and the Beast and many other Disney animated feature films are adaptations from literary sources. TV docu-dramas have been created about figures in the news, such as Amy Fisher and Jessica DeBoer. Biographies, autobiographies, translations, and musical adaptations as well as many non-fiction children's books are, in fact, blendings of fact and fantasy.

All professions reward good communication skills. One's ability to understand, synthesize, and communicate facts to others is as necessary to a doctor as it is to a writer. With this in mind, students should find "Creative Non-Fiction," with its combination of the challenge of research and the pleasure of self-expression, to be a valuable elective.

Projects students will pursue will include adaptations from one medium to another; translations from one language to another or bilingual texts; science/math/history for children; personal essays/interviews/oral history; autobiographical fiction, poetry, or drama; folklore/oral traditions into fiction, picture books, animation. Students will complete either one long (25-30 page) project or three short papers (10-15 pages each) on a related theme. Two drafts will be required. NOTE: This class can be useful to Juniors in anticipation of Honors Thesis work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Virginia Weckstrom-Kantor

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No audition required. All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two credits. The second credit is at the discretion of the instructor. Every student must elect section 001 for one hour. Those students who will fulfill the requirements for two credits MUST also elect Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit.

For one credit, students must participate in two ensembles. For two credits, students must participate in the large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit (6-8 hours of practice and rehearsal for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term, if appropriate. This course may be used to satisfy the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement.

Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of strings and winds; brass quintet; intermediate recorders; string quartet; woodwind quintet; and some other duos and trios, including piano and harpsichord.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 Music, War, and Propaganda.

Instructor(s): Adele Margaret Smaill

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During the twentieth century the manipulation of public opinion through propaganda has become an increasingly important component in successful war efforts. Journalism, literature, art, film, and music are among the cultural media used to maintain or undermine civilian support. Considering several different conflicts, we will investigate the use of music in wartime as entertainment, as a response to grief and loss, and above all, as propaganda created by both proponents and opponents of war for the purpose of swaying popular opinion. We will draw connections between such music and other forms of cultural expression produced in times of war, including poetry, posters, diaries, newspaper reporting and film. Specific topics to be explored include the role of many women musicians as supporters of the British war effort during World War I; the use of swing music by musicians such as Glenn Miller, Count Basie, and Duke Ellington as propaganda by the United States in World War II; the incorporation of music within the anti-war movement during the Vietnam War; and censorship practices in popular music during the Gulf War. We will also investigate the use of music in films about war and the military, such as "Casablanca" and "Top Gun."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 002 Musical Expressions of Ghana: Palmwine Guitar and Ashanti Drum Ensemble.

Instructor(s): Koo Nimo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This hands on music course, which requires no prior musical training, will explore several musical styles of West Africa, specifically the royal drumming ensemble and guitar traditions of the Ashanti people of Ghana.

The course will consist of a one hour private lesson per week in either Ashante drumming or palm wine guitar (to be chosen by the student), and two one & 1/2 hour ensemble sessions in the mixed Ghanaian Palm Wine Guitar and Ashante Drumming ensemble.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 Mixed Choral Ensemble. This course meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

Instructor(s): Katherine Lenore Fitzgibbon

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 255. Film Experience.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to central concepts of film analysis form, narrative, shot, editing, mise-en-scene, spectatorship, visual pleasure, the classical Hollywood style, and film genre. Analytical theories about cinematic form (from Sergei Eisenstein to David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, and Rick Altman) will be explored through close analysis of thirteen American and European films, a process which will illustrate how cinema relies on highly complex and specific signifying practices. We will examine how various systems for conveying narrative and meaning become established, how American film genres have evolved through continual innovation, and how some filmmakers have employed radically new experimental structures that challenged viewers to make sense of unfamiliar form. Critical discussions of the films and the assigned readings will be the key element of our work. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation in discussion and four short (5-6 page) papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 257. Visual Sources.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Ways of Seeing.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to develop and sharpen the students' skills of visual analysis by examining the world of images in which we live and discussing the process of perception. In order to better understand the "language" of images, we will analyze selected examples of painting, sculpture, the graphic arts, architecture, film, and dance. The works studied will not necessarily be considered in chronological order and we will not restrict ourselves to those works that are labeled "great" by art historians and critics. We will include images of popular and commercial art both from the past and the present.

In the course, the unique methods and materials used in creating a work of art will be discussed. (In the case of painting, for example, we will consider the difference between oil, tempera, and water color.) But we will not be concerned with form and materials alone. Images will be studied not only in terms of form, but content, and the relationship between art and audience. How does the visual artist (or advertiser) convey certain moods and/or messages through the arrangement and juxtaposition of forms? What is the impact and effect of the visual environment on our psychological state? How do visual artists convey certain cultural beliefs and attitudes in their arrangement and presentation of images?

In the final section of the course we will consider the display of art in public spaces including museums and galleries and the sometimes controversial issues that have surrounded the showing and funding of art in the United States. In conjunction with this and other aspects of the course, museum and gallery visits are planned, involving the study of objects at close hand and discussions with museum and gallery personnel.

There will be several short papers and students will be asked to keep a journal of their ideas about the visual arts that they encounter in their day to day experiences or in which they are especially interested. Readings may include works by John Berger, Rudolph Arnheim, Joshua Taylor, Kendall Walton, T.J. Clark, Erwin Panofsky, Linda Nochlin, Tamar Garb, and Carol Duncan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 275. The Western Mind in Revolution: Six Interpretations of the Human Condition.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will treat six major reinterpretations of the human condition from the 16th to the 20th centuries generated by intellectual revolutions in astronomy (Copernicus: the heliocentric theory) theology (Luther: the Reformation), biology (Darwin: evolution of the species), sociology (Marx: Communism), psychology (Freud: psychoanalysis), and physics (Einstein: the theory of relativity).

All six reinterpretations initiated a profound revaluation of Western concept of the self as well as a reassessment of the nature and function of his/her political and social institutions. Since each of these revolutions arose in direct opposition to some of the most central and firmly accepted doctrines of their respective ages, we will study:

  1. how each thinker perceived the particular "truth" he sought to communicate;
  2. the problems entailed in expressing and communicating these truths; and
  3. the traumatic nature of the psychological upheaval caused by these cataclysmic transitions from the past to the future both on the personal and cultural level.

If the function of humanistic education is to enable the individual to see where he/she stands in today's maelstrom of conflicting intellectual and cultural currents, it is first necessary to see where others have stood and what positions were abandoned. The emphasis of this course will not be upon truths finally revealed or upon problems forever abandoned, but rather upon certain quite definite perspectives that, arising out of specific historical contexts, at once solved a few often technical problems within a specialized discipline while unexpectedly creating many new ones for Western culture as a whole.

Texts:

  • Copernicus, On the Revolution of the Heavenly Bodies (1543);
  • Luther, Appeal to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation (1520), Of the Liberty of a Christian Man (1520);
  • Darwin, The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859);
  • Marx, Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts (1844), Das Kapital (1867, 1885, 1894);
  • Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905);
  • and Einstein, Relativity, the Special and the General Theory: A Popular Exposition (1921).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 280/English 245/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 310. Medieval Sources of Modern Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Pagans, Christians, and Barbarians in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Meets with MEMS 422.001.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The Dark Ages" conjures up lurid pictures of savagery, superstition, barbarians wearing horned helmets, and persistently inclement weather. This course will attempt to uncover more complex, less stereotyped perspectives on a fascinating period of Western European history. We will begin with the encounter between pagans and Christians in the field not only of religious belief, but also of philosophy and the arts; we will ask questions about the status of the body and its representations; about the role of the intellectual life in the midst of political intrigue; and most importantly about the framing of a new history of origins and endings, a new narrative of purpose, pattern, choice, and engagement. How did Christians use paganism as a grounding and source for a new philosophy? How did barbarians use Christianity in order to represent and perhaps even to discover their own history?

Works will include: Plato, Phaedo; The Sayings of the Desert Fathers; The Life of Mary the Egyptian; Augustine, Confessions; Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks (selections); Gildas, The Ruin of Britain (selections); Beowulf.

The course is interdisciplinary in nature, and will include a study of selected examples of the visual arts to enrich and deepen our understanding of the period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 312/Slavic Film 312. Central European Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Race, Ethnicity and Gender Issues

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing R&E Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Slavic Linguistics, Literary Theory, Film, and Surveys 312.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 318. Critical Approaches to Literature.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Classic Modernism: Art, Philosophy, Myth

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The period of classic modernism in the first half of the 20th century saw an extraordinary outpouring of artistic and critical activity, much of it experimental and avant-garde in nature, entailing a radical break with the past. A coherent and finely articulated body of critical thought emerged, which exercised, especially in the visual arts, considerable influence over how that art was understood, and even, to a certain extent, how it was produced. Modernist theory emphasizes the autonomy of the work, its self-sufficiency and even indifference to other areas of human endeavor, such as philosophy or religion. The defining gesture was the "self-reflexive turn" the work's centripetal reference to the materials and means of its own making. The gesture sought a state of primordial opacity.

Ironically, the search for the "primordial" took modernist artists and theorists not beyond history or apart from it as they sometimes claimed, but rather back more deeply into the sources of the Western tradition. Picasso in his drawings recovered the tremulous line of the Greek vase painters; Moore turned to the Elgin marbles; Nietzsche, Rilke, and Mann evoked the myths of Dionysus and Orpheus to organize their analysis of aesthetic form. At a deeper, perhaps less conscious level of engagement, modernists recuperated the idea of a subsistent, unified Being from the pre-socratic philosophers and their heirs.

This course will explore, through the close reading of literature and the visual arts, the problems and contradictions of the modernist use of the Greek tradition. To what extent was this "recovery" an act of the imagination a construction of the past bearing little relation to ancient historical reality as far as we can know it? To what extent was the ancient material deployed politically, rather than archeologically, to invent the "Modern?"

In this interdisciplinary course, we will study both literature and the visual arts. In addition, we will also read a selection of critical essays considered seminal to the study of modernism:

Thomas Mann Death in Venice

Rainer Maria Rilke Sonnets to Orpheus
Wassily Kandinsky painting and drawing

Virginia Woolf To the Lighthouse
Henry Moore sculpture
Barbara Hepworth sculpture and drawings

William Faulkner As I Lay Dying
Jackson Pollock paintings

Samuel Beckett Waiting for Godot
Mark Rothko paintings

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 322. Advanced Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~balducci/advanced.html

This informal Seminar is designed to build upon skills and themes developed in RC Humanities 222 "Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults." The casual setting of the seminar is intended to encourage interaction and collaboration among students. Weekly paper swaps allow students to become familiar with the writing styles and interests of others in the course. Support and suggestions, as well as collaborations (when feasible) are encouraged. Students are expected to support their theories with articles, books, scripts, and other material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Introduction to World Performance. Meets with Theatre and Drama 212.001.

Instructor(s): Mbala Nkanga Dieudonne (mbalank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to World Performance traditions based on non-Western societies. In this context World Performance is perceived as the process of artistic and social creation for display of human conflicts and identity, as well as the concept of cultural agency. It is intended to help undergraduate students gain knowledge and enhance their understanding of performance traditions and practice of theatre and drama around the world. Globally, this course is meant to complement Theatre 211 (Intro to Theatre and Drama) mainly dealing with Western Drama. Important issues to be examined will include:

  • nature of performance and conditions of occurrences in social and political contexts;
  • modes of performance (dramatism, everyday life...);
  • rituals and ritualistic drama (as artistic and sociocultural productions);
  • non-Western dramaturgy (use of social and cultural patterns) and the performance perspective;
  • the relationship between performer and the audience (the latter being the ingredient that completes the performance process).

This course will consist of two sections: Lecture by the instructor, and Discussions led by the Graduate Student Instructor (GSI). Assignments will include: reading of important selected materials, group workshop activities on assigned themes, bibliographical search of non-Western materials, and an essay. Participation in both lecture and discussion sessions is mandatory.

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RCHUMS 350. Creative Musicianship.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew Jay Kirschner

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This music theory-composition course is designed to give students the skills necessary to understand and to create music as a form of personal expression. Nothing is assumed in the way of musical background, and those who are apprehensive about composition will be welcomed and guided through a process that enables them to create music of their own. Many students in the class will have had instrumental or vocal performance experience; others may have taken music theory or history classes; and some of them will already be composers. All are welcome. 20 students will be accepted. Each student works at his/her own level on the musical element under consideration (rhythm, melody, harmony). The course meets for 4 class hours, and students should plan to spend a minimum of 10-12 hours per week preparing materials for the Hums 350 class. There will be a programmed theory text required, to be selected according to your own level of experience. The accompanying lab (RC Humanities 351) is required unless excused by the instructor.

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RCHUMS 351. Creative Musicianship Lab.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew Jay Kirschner

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 350. (1-2). (CE). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a required lab course to be taken with Humanities 350; however, it can be taken by itself. It will deal with the three basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony) through music reading, notation, singing, use of ear-training tapes, and computer lab programs. The class will be divided into three or four sections according to ability and experience levels. Each section meets together as a group, and students will also work individually and with a lab partner. It may be elected for either one or two credits, depending on the amount of work one chooses to do. Attendance at both Tuesday and Thursday class sessions is necessary whether you are taking the lab for one or two credits. Advanced students may be exempted from taking this lab by permission of the instructor.

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RCHUMS 357. What Television Means: Research, Analysis, and Interpretation.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra Smith Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Social critic Raymond Williams reminds us that public forms of discourse/communication have evolved through a series of forms: repertory companies, commercial theatres, motion pictures, and television, for example. In each of these cases, he observes: "There has been a new sharing and integration of languages, at least of gesture and systems of signs. Moreover, these fresh inter-relationships are not merely available; in the course of their use and development, they are themselves transformative, and means of communication are transformed as they are employed." How does television shape our thinking? In this class, we will be researching and critiquing various genres of television discourse to apply relevant analytic tools to the content and to examine our own responses to the content in light of the cultural climate we inhabit. Much of what is said about television is inaccurate and superficial; we will examine what is on the screen and what experience, background, and point-of-view we bring to the text. Four papers on differing genres of text are required, as well as presentations to the class on individuals' research findings. Class discussion and screenings are regular required parts of the course each week. A long final paper is written on a topic agreed upon in individual conferences.

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RCHUMS 381. Shakespeare on the Stage.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 280. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course involves intensive study of Shakepeare's plays as performed events. Students will read, discuss, analyze and most particularly explore through actual performance outstanding scenes from several major plays in order to discover how Shakespeare's drama communicates its meaning to an audience in the theatre. Attention to the conventions of the Elizabethan stage, the shape of Shakespeare's career, and modern interpretations of the plays (including select video clips) will supplement this direct exlporation of the texts in performance.

Due to the much heralded residency of the Royal Shakespeare Company in March, the course will be focussed primarily on their offerings, Shakespeare's first sequence of History plays Henry VI, Parts 1, 2 & 3 together with Richard III but we will also cover an early comedy (Taming of the Shrew), a major tragedy (Othello), and a "problem play" (Measure for Measure). Attending and reviewing the majority of the RSC's performances, as well as the Dept. of Theater & Drama's Measure for Measure in April will also be required.

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RCHUMS 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Children Under Fire

Instructor(s): Elizabeth N Goodenough

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Suffering and remembering longest, children lose most in war. Recent memoirs by "hidden children" of the Holocaust, adolescent diaries from war zones, and oral histories of teenage victims of domestic and urban violence challenge the stereo types of war stories. Examining the sense of lost childhood and fear of violence which pervade our society, this course explores the child's contest for a place in the world.

How have Children been represented globally as refugees, victims of conflict, or survivors of trauma? In what ways do empire and frontier continue to influence narratives for the young? What roles do gender, classic war stories, national identity, family resilience, issues of guilt and innocence, cross-writing, amnesia and recovered memory, terrorism and expectations of a "happy ending" play in writing about children under fire? Authors include Chinua Acheba, Robert Coles, Robert Cormier, Wanda Gag, Gunter Grass, LeAlan Jones, John Knowles, Bobby Ann Mason, Huynh Quang Nhuong, Roger Rosenblatt, Maurice Sendak, William Shakespeare, Robert Westall, Eli Weisel, Jane Yolan.

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RCHUMS 411. Translation Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Reading proficiency in a foreign language. Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/translation.htm

We will begin with an inquiry into the nature and function of language as it defines man and allows him to "translate" his experience of being in the world to himself and others. In this connection, we will examine a number of influential philosophical views on language. Next, we will undertake an exercise in inter-semiotic translation from one artistic medium into another. Following this, we will examine various forms of "translations" within the same language, such as interpretations, re-formulations, and adaptations from one literary genre into another. The rest of the term will then be devoted to the theory and praxis of translation between two different languages. Under the guidance of expert faculty mentors, participants are asked to pursue a translation project of their own choice, suitable to their foreign language abilities and personal interest. Finally, we will edit the accomplishments of the academic term into an anthology for distribution to all contributors. In the course of the term we will read excerpts from the writings of Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Benjamin, Jackobson, Pound, Lefevere, Derrida, and other translation experts.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

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RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RCHUMS 452/Russian 452. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Xavier Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian 452.001.

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RCHUMS 475/Chinese 475/Phil. 475/Asian Studies 475/Hist. of Art 487. The Arts and Letters of China.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/asian/475/001.nsf

See Chinese 475.001.

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RCHUMS 476/Chinese 476/Asian Studies 476. Writer and Society in Modern China.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alexander Des Forges (desforge@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chinese 476.001.

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RCHUMS 481. Play Production Seminar.

Drama

Section 001 Staging a masterwork of political musical comedy Brecht and Weill's The Threepenny Opera.

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu), Katherine Mendeloff

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This play production seminar will focus on a masterpiece of political theater as well a defining work of modern musical theater. German playwright Bertolt Brecht and composer Kurt Weill used John Gay's The Beggars Opera to make a satirical statement about the corruption of bourgeoise capitalism. Students will read Gay's original work and will research the contemporary background of Brecht and Weill musical play, as part of the rehearsal process to bring The Threepenny Opera to the RC Auditorium stage.

The course will be co-taught by Martin Walsh, dramaturg, Kate Mendeloff, director, and Benjamin Cohen, musical director. Actors, singers,musicians are all encouraged to enroll, as are students interested in directing and set, lighting and costume design. Actors should be assured that while this is a challenging score, there are many roles for non-singers. There is no pre-requisite, although previous acting experience is recommended. Enrollment is by interview or audition only. Contact Kate Mendeloff for interview and audition times at 647-4354 or at mendelof@umich.edu.

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RCHUMS 484. Seminar in Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 002 Sex Roles and Relationships in Modern Drama

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, Hums. 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this advanced acting workshop, students will explore several major plays of the modern theater through the process of rehearsal and performance. Plays will be thematically linked to the study of sex roles and relationships and will include playwrights such as Strindberg, Ibsen, Shaw, Wilde and several contemporary writers as well, such as Eve Ensler and Tony Kushner. The work will expose students to a range of periods and styles.

Plays under consideration are Miss Julie by August Strindberg, Salome or The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Candida by Shaw and Floating Rhoda and the Glue Man by Eve Ensler. Students should have completed Humanities 282: Actor and Text I or another acting class or should have had some prior acting experience. Students with an interest in directing are welcome also. Feel free to contact the instructor, Kate Mendeloff at mendelof@umich.edu before registering for the class.

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RCHUMS 484. Seminar in Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 003 Detroit Oral History Project. Meets with RC Social Science 460.002.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff, Charles C Bright

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, Hums. 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Social Science 460.002.

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RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Medieval Drama Project. (2 credits).

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated four times, for a total of four credits. Can be elected more than once in the same term.

Foriegn Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An exploratory workshop in the secular drama of the late Middle Ages (particularly the farces and Carnival plays of France and Germany) leading to performance/workshop venues of Andrieu de la Vigne's Miracle of the Blind Man and Cripple and Hans Sachs' Death in the Tree (with other possible works) at the 36th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo in early May and the 2-7 July meeting of the Societe internationale pour l'etude du theatre medieval (SITM) in Groningen, The Netherlands. Both actors and researchers, design and directing students welcome.

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RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 002 Playwright/Director/Actor workshop. (? credits).

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated four times, for a total of four credits. Can be elected more than once in the same term.

Foriegn Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students with an interest in acting, directing, and playwriting are encouraged to join this hands on exploration of new play development. Up to a half dozen plays by new student playwrights will be chosen for the workshop and the class ensemble of actors and directors will take them through the evolution process from early draft to production at the end of term. Prospective playwrights are encouraged to submit a draft or a scenario and several pages of sample dialogue to Kate Mendeloff's mailbox in the RC office by Thanksgiving break. Playwrights will have an opportunity for work with Carolyn Balducci of the Creative Writing program in addition to the group process in class. The course is open to theatre students at all levels and has no formal prerequisite, but previous experience is recommended.

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Graduate Course Listings for RCHUMS.


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