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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies


This page was created at 5:19 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 – April 26)

Open courses in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies
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Wolverine Access Subject listing for ACABS

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

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ACABS 102. Elementary Classical Hebrew II.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 101. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A continuation of ACABS 101 with increased emphasis on the Biblical Hebrew verbal system and syntax as presented in Seow's A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew (revised). Additionally, students will be introduced to select readings from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Final grades will be based upon daily class performance and homework assignments, quizzes, and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 202. Intermediate Classical Hebrew, II.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Language Courses

Section 001 – Meets with ACABS 602.001

Instructor(s): Charles R Krahmalkov (crkrah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 201. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As a continuation of ACABS 201, the students will be introduced to additional elements of Biblical Hebrew syntax and other aspects of advanced grammar. Further selected Biblical texts will be read, and their historical and literary backgrounds analyzed and discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 221 / RELIGION 280. Jesus and the Gospels.

New Testament

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will probe the Gospels, including some non-canonical versions (e.g., the Gospel according to Thomas), as sources of the life and teachings of Jesus, the Jew. How reliable are the portraits of Jesus in the Gospels, the oldest of which having been written some forty years after his execution? Through an acquirement of the various critical methods which are applied to the Gospel texts by scholars, students will be enabled to form a defensible answer to this question. In addition to the methodological instruction and exercises, there will be an impartion of the necessary knowledge about the historical, social, and religious world of Jesus and the Gospels, so that a correct reading of Jesus within Judaism might be given. The format of the course consists of two lectures per week by the instructor and a weekly discussion session conducted by a GSI. The course grade will be based upon daily assignments and attendance; midterm and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 291. Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 – Magic in the Ancient World and in the Bible.

Instructor(s): Brian B Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What role does magic play in religious life? Does magic embody a society's symbolic expression of its own self-identity? Like science and religion, does magic function as an analytical category for the comparative study of cultures? How has the Bible impacted modern notions about magic and magic's relation to religion? The ancient cultures of the Middle East and those of the eastern Mediterranean provided the context for the production of the Bible and these together have greatly influenced modern, western notions about the relationship of magic and religion. As a means of exploring these and related topics, the course, Magic in the Ancient World and in the Bible, offers the student the opportunity to engage in a series of studies on magic across several centuries and many ancient cultures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 308 / GREEK 308. The Acts of the Apostles.

New Testament: Courses in Greek

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Traianos Gagos (traianos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Greek 102; and permission of instructor. Taught in Greek. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Greek 308.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 382 / HISTART 382 / ANTHRCUL 381. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology.

Ancient Egypt: Culture Courses

Section 001 – Meets with ACABS 686.001.

Instructor(s): Janet E Richards

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses specifically on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from ca. 3200 bc–285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes will be explored, and specific sites, some well-known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids), some less well-known (such as the town of Karanis and the city of Kerma), will be investigated as examples of different kinds of interpretive problems in archaeology. The course will also introduce a consideration of theoretical approaches to Nile Valley archaeological data and the ways in which they articulate with other sources of information. While it is complementary in subject matter to ACABS 281, which concentrates on the history of ancient Egypt of the Dynastic period through texts, this course is designed to stand alone. Course grade is based on midterm, final, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 393 / AAPTIS 393 / RELIGION 393. The Religion of Zoroaster.

General Near Eastern Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Zoroastrianism has fascinated many. This course explores the emergence and development of this ancient religion which is still practiced today, from its beginnings in central Asia in the second millennium BC to its rise as the religion of the pre-Islamic empires of Persian Achaemenids, the Parthians, and Sasanians, up to the present. Zoroastrianism is mostly recognized as the religion of the Magi. Students will study the Zoroastrian views on the world as the battlefield of the forces of Good and Evil, and the fundamental role of mankind in the fight against Evil, toward universal Salvation, and in the latter part of the course discuss the similarities of these views to some of those in Judaism, Christianity, as well as Classical and Modern Western Thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 395. Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies: Directed Readings.

General ACABS

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 412. Akkadian Texts.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduction to the Semitic language of ancient Babylonia and to the cuneiform writing system. The first term (411) concentrates on a presentation of basic grammar, and the second term (412) on the reading of several ancient texts in cuneiform. Grammatical lectures, student recitation, homework assignments. Weekly quizzes, midterm, and final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 414 / RELIGION 442. Mythology and Literature of Ancient Mesopotamia.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Culture Course

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Piotr A Michalowski (piotrm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~piotrm/ACABS414.html

The first known literature in the world was created almost five thousand years ago in southern Mesopotamia, in the area occupied by the modern state of Iraq. These myths, hymns, epics, proverbs, omens, spells as well as many other kinds of texts were written on clay tablets using the cuneiform script. The poems were composed in various languages, primarily in Sumerian and Akkadian (Babylonian), but we will be reading these texts in modern English translations and no knowledge of the ancient languages is required.

Cuneiform was invented around 3300 BC and was used widely until the first centuries of the modern era. Archaeologists and plunderers have unearthed hundreds of thousands of inscribed clay tablets providing us with a fairly complete picture of this long-lived literature of ancient Sumer, Assyria, and Babylonia. We will be reading the most important of these texts and using them as a means of understanding the worldview of a long lost ancient society. The pleasure of reading will therefore also serve as a pretext for a meditation on cross-cultural communication across time and space, as we try to respect difference but at the same time seek common ground with different people from different civilizations. Requirements: Attendance at lectures, reading of assignments, midterm and final examinations. Grading: Midterm 40%, Final examination 60%.

Readings: The two required books: Benjamin R. Foster, From Distant Days: Myths, Tales and Poetry of Ancient Mesopotamia (Bethesda: CDL Press, 1995) and Andrew George, The Epic of Gilgamesh: The Babylonian Epic Poem and Other Texts in Akkadian and Sumerian (Penguin, 2000) will be available at Shaman Drum Bookstore on State Street. A course pack, in two volumes, is available at Accu-Copy, 518 East William Street; these are marked as I (essays) and II (text translations). Other materials will be made available during the course.

The following books will be on reserve at the Reserve Reading Room of the Undergraduate Library (Shapiro):

  • Foster, From Distant Days, Before the Muses;
  • George, The Epic of Gilgamesh;
  • A.L. Oppenheim, Ancient Mesopotamia;
  • Oppenheim, Letters from Mesopotamia;
  • Stephanie Dalley, Myths from Mesopotamia; and
  • Michael Roaf, Cultural Atlas of Mesopotamia and the Ancient Near East.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 415. Elementary Hittite.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will present the basics of Hittite grammar through lectures, student recitation, and reading exercises in transliteration. We will acquaint ourselves with the cuneiform writing system and consider the ramifications of the adoption of this script by the Hittites for the recovery of the linguistic realities of ancient Anatolia. Attention will be given to the role of Hittite within the Indo-European family of languages. Textbook: H.A. Hoffner Jr., An Introduction to the Hittite Language. Audience: Undergraduate and graduate students whose concentration is in Near Eastern Studies, Linguistics, and Classics.

Attendance at lectures and participation in classroom discussion and recitation. Quizzes, midterm and final exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 486. Introduction to Middle Egyptian, II.

Ancient Egypt: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry G Wilfong (twilfong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 485. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A basic introduction to Egyptian hieroglyphics and Middle Egyptian, the classical form of the ancient Egyptian language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 512. Sumerian Texts.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Piotr A Michalowski (piotrm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 511. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of Introduction to Sumerian with emphasis on learning to read.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 582. Ugaritic, II.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles R Krahmalkov (crkrah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 581. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings in the Ras Shamra texts, with emphasis on the development of the Canaanite languages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 592. Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 – Mesopotamian Hist. & Arch.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ACABS 592. Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 002 – Methodology in the Study of Second Temple Judaism.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Judaic and Christian studies are gradually converging toward a more comprehensive and inclusive approach to the period of Judaism between 300 BCE and 200 CE. The concept of "late" monolithic Judaism, which constituted the background of the one Christianity, has been lately replaced by the view of an "early" pluralistic period that was both the beginning of a new stage in the inner evolution of Judaism and the first, or "Jewish," phase of Christianity. Now, the period is turning into something even more complex: the historical setting of many rival contemporaneous Judaisms (including early Christianity). With the varieties of its ideological systems, middle Judaism marks the passage from ancient Judaism to the distinct existence of the two major branches of modern Judaism: Christianity and Rabbinism. The goal of the modern interpreter is no longer the identification and synchronic study of the one Judaism as witnessed by the Jewish sources of the time, nor the identification and diachronic study of an overlapping phase in the evolution of Jewish and Christian religions. The object of a history of middle Judaic thought is the identification and diachronic study of many parallel Judaisms (including early Christianity) in themselves and in the context of their complex synchronic relationships.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 593. Mini Course – Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 – Portraiture in Ancient Egypt. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 411.001 and History of Art 489.003. Meets Jan 28, 31, and Feb 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, and 20, 2002.

Instructor(s): Lorelei Corcoran

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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This page was created at 5:19 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.


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