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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in American Culture


This page was created at 7:58 AM on Wed, Oct 31, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 April 26)

Open courses in American Culture
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for AMCULT

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for American Culture.

What's New This Week in American Culture.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.

Courses in Ojibwa

A full sequence of Ojibwa cannot be guaranteed. Students must consult with the American Culture Program Office before undertaking Ojibwa to satisfy the College language requirement.


AMCULT 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Asian Americans & the Civil Rights Movement. Meets with History 196.002.

Instructor(s): Scott Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did people of Asian ancestry living in the United States respond to the Civil Rights Movements? How did the social and political achievements of the Civil Rights Movement affect patterns of Asian immigration and the experience of Asians in the U.S.?

In this course, we will examine the history of racism against Asian Americans and the diverse ways Asian Americans have sought to protest, resist, or accommodate. We also will pay particular attention to the relations between Asian Americans and other communities of color, such as African Americans and Arab Americans. Students will have a particular opportunity to study the late 1960s movement which created the concept of "Asian American" identity and to understand the historical context in which this movement arose.

Topics we will study include:

  • the World War II internment of Japanese Americans and the movement for redress;
  • Asian American participation in the African American struggle for freedom;
  • student activist campaigns for Asian American Studies and Ethnic Studies;
  • Asian American opposition to the Vietnam War;
  • mobilizations against hate crimes and anti-Asian violence;
  • Hawaiian sovereignty and indigenous peoples' rights;
  • the empowerment of immigrant youth and communities; and
  • efforts to build multi-ethnic coalitions.

Readings will include Asian Americans: The Movement and the Moment by Steve Louie and Glenn Omatsu, Living for Change by Grace Lee Boggs, Asian American Dreams by Helen Zia, as well as writings by Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Yuri Kochiyama, Philip Vera Cruz, and various primary sources. Readings will be complemented by videos and films. Requirements consist of active participation in seminar discussions, periodic short writing assignments, and a collaborative project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 002 Gender, Slavery, and Freedom. Meets with Women's Studies 150.001.

Instructor(s): Hannah Rosen (hrosen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will explore historical and theoretical perspectives on race and gender and their intersection in U.S. history, culture, and politics by examining the role of gender in the history of slavery, emancipation, and the struggle of African Americans to construct a meaningful freedom in the United States. We will investigate how the organization of gender was conditioned by, and how it undergirded, systems of both slavery and racism in the 18th and 19th-century U.S. South.

  • What role did gender play in the establishment of slavery and racial hierarchy in colonial North America?
  • How did gender shape the experience of slavery for African-American women and men?
  • How did slavery affect gender relations among white southerners?
  • What was the nature of gender relations within slave communities?
  • What notions of womanhood and manhood were imposed on slaves by slaveholders and what notions did slaves construct for themselves?
  • What were Black men and women's visions for freedom and citizenship after emancipation?
  • And how did gender shape postemancipation struggles between Blacks and whites as well as relations between Black women and men?

To explore these questions, we will consider topics such as men's and women's labor, family, sexuality, citizenship, and rape and other forms of violence. Using primary and secondary sources, we will also explore the methods of historical interpretation and argumentation. First year students only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Race: American Culture Dialoge Behind & Idea.

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

There are few concepts in American Culture that get as much attention in politics and the press as race, and yet the concept continues to signal deep controversy and misunderstanding between national groups. If race does not exist as a biological category (which has inspired some scholars to put it in scare quotes), then why is the concept still so tied to individual appearance? How have current group categories such as "African American" and "white" been conceived in the past, compared to the present day? How have Americans traditionally imagined the differences (or similarities) among concepts such as "race," "color," and "ethnicity," "national identity" and "culture"? And how do class, gender, and sexuality intersect with these categories? This course will explore the ways American cultural and social dialogues about the meaning of race have changed over time, why the concept is so unstable, and indeed how our understanding of "race" at any historical moment depends on any number of other social factors. Course materials will include American literature and film, as well as scholarship drawn from American Studies, sociology, history, and feminist theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 201. American Values.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James W Cook (jwcook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to U.S. cultural studies, this course examines some of the most powerful values and value systems in our nation's history. The course has two primary goals: first, to demonstrate how "American values" have emerged as social, economic, political, and cultural processes over time; and second, to explore how value systems are continuously re-thought, re-fashioned, and contested. The use of the plural in the course title is therefore deliberate. This is a course about our nation's core ideals as well as their diverse meanings and shifting histories. It is also a course about the ongoing challenges of defining those ideals in truly democratic ways. Highly recommended for anyone who seeks a better understanding of how ideology works in this country.

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AMCULT 205. American Cultures.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 Women's Health in the 19th-21st Century.

Instructor(s): Christine Kae Bass (cbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will use women's health in 19th- and 20th-century America as a lens through which to view women's history, social history, and medical history. We will explore a wide range of topics, including: sexuality, abortion, birth control, childbirth, women's diseases, women as health care reformers, and women as health care professionals. In particular, we will look at how women's diseases are socially constructed and how they often reflect society's views of women. We will also look at how gender, race, and class impact access to medical care and research on women's health. The course will be a seminar with discussion based upon close reading of the assigned texts. There will be several short papers, a class presentation, and a final examination.

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AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 002 American Subcultural Movements Beatniks, Hippies and Punks.

Instructor(s): Bruce Conforth

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines post WWII America and the subcultures it created: beats, hippies, punks, etc. By tracing the history of each group the course investigates how these American secondary cultures responded to the traditional, or dominant, culture and how each group, despite radical appearances, drew upon a host of traditional cultural tools and processes to create their own communities. Investigating the economic, political, social, cultural, and technological events that surrounded the creation of these groups, the course draws a distinction between subcultures and countercultures, as well as defines the manner in which each may function as a folk culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 213. Introduction to Latino Studies Humanities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 215. Introduction to Asian American Studies Humanities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sylvia E Kwon

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 230 / HISTART 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 230.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 231. Visual & Material Culture Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kristin A Hass

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidonie A Smith (sidsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001 Feminist Practice of Oral History. Meets with Women's Studies 342.001. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Emily Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 342.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 Asian Pacific Americans & the Law. (1 Credit). Runs Runs 2/12 3/19.

Instructor(s): Roland Hwang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 003 Photography: The Photo Essay. (3 Credits). Basic Knowledge of Camera & Darkroom Highly Recommended. NOT OPEN TO FRESHMAN.

Instructor(s): Joanne Leonard (joannell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 304 / SOC 304. American Immigration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 304.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 306 / PSYCH 317. Community Based Research.

Section 001 Requires concurrent enrollment in American Culture 306.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, and concurrent enrollment in Amer. Cult. 205. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/Detroit.Initiative/

See Psychology 317.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 307 / PSYCH 318. Laboratory in Community Research.

Section 001 Laboratory in Community Intervention.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Amer. Cult. 306. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/Detroit.Initiative/

See Psychology 318.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 001 Asian/Pacific American Leadership Development. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine strategies for building communities and developing leadership skills through practice. This term, the course focuses on the Asian Pacific American community at Michigan. The major component of the course is that each student is required to spend some time each week working in an APA campus or community-based organization. Everyone is encouraged to share their experiences in class discussions and collaborate on like-minded projects or programs. This will be supplemented with course readings, exercises, guest speakers, and films. For the final project, students will work together on a public program that educates and empowers the community. This is an optional/optimal 2-term course, continuing from Fall 2001. Enrollment is by Permission of Instructor Only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 310. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Women in Prison. Meets with Women's Studies 483.003.

Instructor(s): Christina Jose-Kampfner (carino@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 483.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 312 / HISTORY 312. History of Latinos in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudolph Alvarado

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Amer. Cult. 315. (3). (Excl). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 314 / HISTORY 378. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an overview of Asian/Pacific American history from World War II to the present. Groups to be examined include Korean, Filipino, South Asian, Southeast Asian, Pacific Islander, Chinese, and Japanese Americans. We will place these experiences into a national and international context of comparative race relations and U.S.-Asia relations. Our study will begin with the questions: What does it mean to study history from an Asian/Pacific American perspective? How and why has Asian/Pacific American history become a part of the curriculum?

Readings and lectures will engage the following historical issues and themes:

  • immigrant efforts to build community in the face of racial exclusion;
  • the place of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the construction of the U.S. empire;
  • World War II and the internment of Japanese Americans;
  • the impact of the Vietnam War and the resettlement of Southeast Asian refugees;
  • the construction of gender and the experience of women in Asian/Pacific American communities;
  • the shifting position of Asian/Pacific American labor in the capitalist economy;
  • the emergence of Asian/Pacific American activism in the fight for social justice;
  • the changing demographics and community composition created by post-1965 immigration. <\ul>

    Examples of required readings include No-No Boy by John Okada; The Bridge at No Gun Ri by Sang-Hun Choe; Catfish and Mandela by Andrew Pham; Living for Change by Grace Lee Boggs, and a course pack with articles and primary documents. Readings will be complemented by films and videos.

    Course requirements: regular attendance/participation in lecture and discussion, periodic short writing assignments, a collaborative group research project, and in-class final.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

    Courses in Ojibwa

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    AMCULT 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

    Courses in Ojibwa

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    AMCULT 324 / ENGLISH 381. Asian American Literature.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Susan Najita (najita@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See English 381.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 339 / ANTHRCUL 339. American Religious Movements.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Cultural Anthropology 339.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

    AMCULT 345. American Politics and Society.

    Section 001 Modern US 1865-1901. Meets with History 465.001.

    Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See History 465.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    AMCULT 350. Approaches to American Culture.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): June M Howard (jmhoward@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    AMCULT 367 / HISTORY 367. American Indian History.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Liza Black (lizab@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

    R&E

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students will engage the major themes in American Indian history, including land, federal & state policy, sovereignty, social movements and resistance movements. Students will write several one-page papers, a midterm and a final. Books include: Like a Hurricane and The Indians' New World.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 374 / HISTORY 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    AMCULT 388. Field Study.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    AMCULT 398. Junior Honors Writing Workshop.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of a concentration advisor in American Culture. (1-3). (Excl).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    AMCULT 401. Race and Racialization in the Americas.

    Section 001 Ethnic Modernisms: Early 20th Century.

    Instructor(s): Maria E Cotera (mcotera@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 212 or 213, and 312. (3). (Excl). (R&E).

    R&E

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    During the inter-war years, and indeed from the start of the twentieth century, a dramatic re-visioning of American values was underway. In the words of historian Frederick Hoffman, "a phase of American culture and history (variously called Puritan, industrial, commercial) was repudiated and scorned; in its place, writers, artists, critics sought for aspects of the American scene that had (or were alleged to have) escaped involvement in the worst disasters of that culture." At the center of this search was a growing interest in the "others" of American imperialism, the African-Americans, American Indians, and Mexican-Americans whose rural communities were transformed by the march of modernization and westward expansion.

    In this course we will explore the emergence of a discourse of American identity that was at times based on an intimate relationship with, and appropriation of non "Anglo-Saxon" subjects (as in Anglo American forms of modernist primitivism), and at times founded upon the rigid separation of white from non-white peoples (what Walter Benn Michaels has termed "nativist modernism"). In both cases, this process meant that Anglo American intellectuals were coming to terms with the legacy of colonialism, and for the first time perhaps, comprehending it's centrality to American identity. But the re-evaluation of what it meant to be a modern American was not just a concern of Anglo American intellectuals. While the profound ambivalence toward traditional American values which characterized Anglo American musings on the nature of collective identity generally led to an objectification of the "Other", it nevertheless opened a space for colonized peoples to enter into the conversation about the future of American culture and identity. Indeed, the period witnessed the rise of a generation of American Indian, African American, and Mexican American intellectuals, who, responding to the social and economic transformations that modernity had brought to their communities, and energized by the aesthetic and cultural possibilities wrought in Anglo-America's exploration of itself, formed coalitions and organizations across regional, national, and tribal boundaries to address the role that they would play in the modern nation-state. While their strategies for incorporation into this American dialogue generally corresponded to the ways in which dominant discourse had figured them, these intellectuals also manipulated this discourse to achieve the social, economic, and political goals that they sought.

    In this course we will examine the specific social and economic transformations in colonialist ideology which led to the re-conceptualization of collective identity on the part of this emergent cadre of intellectuals, and the ways in which the limits of these ideological configurations shaped both the aesthetic and the political practices of American Indian, African American, and Latino subjects.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 420 / SPANISH 420. Latin American & Latino/a Film Studies.

    Courses in Spanish

    Section 001 Cultural Encounters in the New World.

    Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 270 or 275. A previous course in Film & Video, or Latin American history, or Latino Studies. (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Credits: (4).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Spanish 420.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    AMCULT 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

    Courses in Ojibwa

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    AMCULT 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

    Courses in Ojibwa

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    AMCULT 432 / HISTART 420. National Identity in American Art.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and any prior coursework in history of art, American culture, or American history. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See History of Art 420.002.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    AMCULT 461 / ANTHRCUL 461 / LING 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Cultural Anthropology 461.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 490 / FILMVID 451. American Film Genres.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required.

    Credits: (4).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    A historical and critical survey of the film genres that have shaped the global profile and internal functioning of the U.S. film industry since the early 20th century. Placed in a broad cultural context, the linkages between film genres and other forms of American popular culture will be addressed, as well as the impact of technological, cultural, and sociopolitical change on the conventions, styles, and modes of spectatorship associated with specific genres. Special attention will be given to the reciprocal effects of film genres on the shaping of gendered and ethnic identities. This term, we will be focusing on genres that treat the theme of modern romance during moments of instability in the film industry, as well as in gender and class relations in the society at large: the musical, melodrama, and romantic comedy.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

    Section 001 Asian American Psychology. (4 credits). Meets with Psych. 401.003

    Instructor(s): Phillip Akutsu (akutsu@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

    Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will provide a critical analysis of cultural, sociopolitical, and historical influences that contributed to the study of Asian American psychology. Topics in the course will be varied and include Asian American personality and identity structures; intergroup/intragroup relations, communication styles, and conflict formation/resolution; family roles/dynamics and intrafamilial stress/conflicts; acculturation, ethnic identity, and multicultural identity formation; prejudice, discrimination, and culturally-imbedded stress/trauma; and health/mental health status and help-seeking/coping strategies.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

    Section 002 Race, Arts and Culture Between World War. (4 credits).

    Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

    Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    "I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber, and liquids and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination indeed, everything and anything expect me."

    So begins Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man (1952), certainly one of the most influential and widely discussed African American novels of the twentieth century. This senior seminar will dedicate considerable time to reading Ellison's classic novel and to interpreting it in historical context. We will also survey the non-fiction writings of Ellison (1914-1994), paying particular attention to his theories about African American and American cultural identity as reflected in the languages and rhythms of literary, political, and musical expression (especially the blues and jazz). Invisible Man, for example, addressed these issues through a strikingly imaginative and controversial depiction of the unnamed main character's "progress" through a series of African American and American political, educational, and cultural institutions and social worlds in the mid-twentieth century. Using Ellison as a partial guide to mid-20th century African American intellectual life, we will also explore the multi-ethnic roots of Ellison's intellectual world, controversies surrounding his writings and ideas, and his impact on later writers. Other authors and critics discussed or read here will include assorted Harlem Renaissance writers, Black leftists, separatists, and liberals, Nation of Islam spokesmen, writers and activists from the 1960s Black Arts movement, and more recent literary artists and postmodernist critics.

    Grades will be determined on the basis of attendance, active participation, short reading quizzes or written commentaries, two short papers (4-6 pp. each), an in-class midterm, and a take-home final exam. There are no specific prerequisites, but it is expected that students will have done some prior relevant coursework in African American Studies, cultural studies, or U.S. literature. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

    Section 003 P.T. Barnum's America: MassCult. (4 Credits). Meets with History 396.002.

    Instructor(s): James W Cook (jwcook@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See History 396.002.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

    Section 004 AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 20TH CENTURY. (4 Credits). Meets with History 397.001.

    Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

    Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See History 397.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

    Section 005 Imperialism & Pacific Islands, 19th Century. (3 Credits). Meets with Hist 498.003.

    Instructor(s): Damon Salesa

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

    Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course engages with the histories of the Pacific, treating them throughout as cross-cultural histories of encounter and entanglement. As the largest feature on Earth, the Pacific Ocean dominates the globe, and the encounter of European and American people with its expanse was, in many ways, critical. These encounters were also critical to the peoples indigenous to the Pacific, and it is with both of these strands of experience that this course engages.

    Topics covered in the course are diverse, including imperial politics and diplomacy; trade, exploration, and commerce; science and art; and transformations in indigenous politics, society, technology, intellectual life, and health.

    The period under view is what might be called the Pacific's long nineteenth century, which began when Pacific Islanders and Europeans first had meaningful meetings with each other, and when the Pacific was propelled into the foreground of the Europe's Enlightenment imagination. The century came to a close with the great powers dividing the Pacific amongst themselves. We will focus on the archipelagos of Hawaii, Samoa and Tahiti, and the imperial powers of the United States and Britain, but attention will also be given to most other areas in the Pacific, and other imperial incursions, including those of France, Spain, and Germany.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

    Section 001 Feminist,Queer & Oppositional Art. (3 credits). Meets with Art 454.006 and Women's Studies 483.008.

    Instructor(s): Jacobsen

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

    Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Women's Studies 483.008.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    Graduate Course Listings for AMCULT.


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