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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 5:20 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 April 26)

Open courses in Cultural Anthropology
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Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.

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ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There will be four short papers due in section, and section leaders may have other requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 158. First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001 The Conceptual Politics of Race: Why People Think About Difference the Way They Do.

Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in an anthropology concentration.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Where does our notion of race come from? Are racial classifications different from other ways of cataloguing humans? Does the act of classifying people into racial and ethnic groups necessarily entail prejudice and produce hierarchy? Is race a universal concept? If so, is there a single system of racial thinking or are there multiple systems? What does it mean to say that race is a social construction? What is the nature and scope of public and private representations of race? What are the best ways to interpreting these representations?

These are a few of the questions that this seminar will explore. Finding answers requires that we distinguish between, and compare the meaning of, two dimensions of racial thinking. Race is both a category of the mind and a category of power. As a result, research on race generally has generally adopted one of two perspectives: a psychological one focusing on the beliefs and attitudes held by individual persons, or an interpretive one focusing on the social, cultural, and political properties of systems of racial classification. Saying that race is a category of mind is saying that race is an idea, and as such is a topic of interest to behavioral scientists, particularly psychologists. Research by these scholars tends to approach race in the context of general cognitive processes like perception, stereotyping, and category bias. Saying that race is a category of power is saying that race is a principle for organizing inequitable distributions of resources and authority, and as such is a topic of interest to anthropologists, historians, sociologists, and political scientists. Researchers from these disciplines typically focus on the ways race functions within systems of power and authority and is articulated in specific systems of domination. The seminar seeks to coordinate and integrate findings from both these perspectives, working to gain a more comprehensive understanding of race and racism.

Course Requirements: Weekly journal ("reaction paper") of notes and queries (2-4 pages, typed and double-spaced) dealing with issues raised in readings and class discussions. Students will lead discussion in at least one class during the term and will make at least one in-class presentation. There will be a short answer final. Active classroom participation is required. Grades will be based on the following: reaction papers will account for 30% of grade, class participation 40%, and the final 30%. All required reading will be posted on the Coursetools Website and can be downloaded without cost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 222. The Comparative Study of Cultures.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In today's society, culture is frequently offered as an explanation as to why people differ from each other or act in certain ways. Yet how do we know what culture is and how can we approach analyzing it? This course explores the organization and representation of fundamental aspects of social life in a variety of non-Western and Western societies. We will be concerned in particular with the formation and the transformation of societies in the context of colonizing and globalizing processes. We also will analyze the ways that cultural difference has been described and accounted for, and the assumptions that underlie long-standing concepts of the West and its others. Our goal is to develop a historically grounded and analytically reflexive approach to the study of human diversity and social change. Topics with which we will be concerned include race, gender, power, ritual, and language. Our readings will center on several in-depth studies, including controversies and debates surrounding certain topics and peoples. These texts will allow us to study not only a wide range of cultural formations, but also differing methods and theoretical perspectives used to interpret them. Classes will be organized around the discussion of texts, films, and supplementary materials, and will include student presentations. Students are expected to attend regularly and be prepared to participate in class. They will be asked to write commentaries and brief papers on the central texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 226 / HISTORY 229. Introduction to Historical Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David William Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthropology 101. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Nostalgia antiques heritage antiques roadshow forgive and forgetHigh Noon replications"
What
DISAPPEARED How do you get inside 8 hr day, five day week, three day weekend,
Does
WORLDS "the mind of someone time rushing by, pastime, industrial time, free time
It
Williamsburgloooongggg dead?" Deadline The History Channel original primitive
?elbaitogen si "hturt" ehT.
Looking backwards. The Construction of Taste. Enola Gay.

Mean"
The end of history."You are so history man. Life history. Fashion Taste
to"
Truth negotiable?? Huh? Tradition. . .tradition. . .tradition
Look
The only important thing about history is that it's got to the point where its probably about to end. Truer than fiction."Legacies. Inheritance. Estates. Contracts. Customary Law. Common Law. Constitutions. Property
at"
You Can't Live in the Past but You Can Go There for Dinner." I Remember Mama. Making history.
The
Inventions of tradition. Commemorations. Monuments. Memorials. Anniversaries. LIES. The objectivity question. Nations Empires Races Customs Rights Privileges Status Vietnam Memorial
margins?
The past is a foreign country, they do things differently there . Get a life, man. Stories. Fiction SILENCES history and histories the production of history"Truth Bunk
They don't build them like they used to. Reincarnation. Time regression. Back to the Future. The hour is late.

Why would you want to study things from the bottom-up ?
The world that slaves made.
Truth and Reconciliation.
Reparations. Certainties Uncertainties Four score and seven years ago Trends
Old World, New World
FREEDOM OF CHOICE get over it Fuggedaboudit Lost & Found

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The past is in play all around us. The past holds extraordinary power over our lives. The past will not go away. The past shapes our futures. The past may obscure its own power over us. The past may introduce pain and difficulty. . .the past establishes our very selves and our rights and status. . .and the past may provide us with pleasure and support

This is why history matters. Historians attempt to know the past in order that we may understand and bring the past to advantage, or to ease our way through the challenging topographies of the past. But such histories are produced in different forms, with different interests, in different spaces, and by many different types of authors. Conflicts over the interpretation and representation of the past reflect important conflicts across our society and around the world, and across generations.

This lecture course Introduction to Historical Anthropology (IHA) focuses on these contentions, these contests, over knowing the past. History is not simply or foremost an academic exercise. The work of history is performed in virtually every vein of our world, and our lives, from dream works, into memory, into learning, into entertainments, into the marketing of goods and the shaping of tastes, into the shaping of our rights, our sense of citizenship, and our very identity, our sense of ourselves. IHA has been developed to explore these workings of history across our lives. . .albeit selectively. . .and to provide powerful ways of knowing, thinking about, and managing the past, thereby empowering ourselves in the world.

Several films/videos will be screened and discussed as part of the work of IHA. Likely candidates are Stranger with a Camera, History and Memory, Guguletu Seven, Chocolat, Kitchen Toto, The Nasty Girl, High Noon, The Germans and their Men, Heaven's Gate

Among the texts to be required in IHA are:

  • Natalie Z. Davis. The Return of Martin Guerre.
  • Michel-Rolph Trouillot. Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History.
  • David William Cohen. The Combing of History.
  • Graham Swift. Waterland.
  • Martin Amis. Time's Arrow.
  • F. Oyono. Houseboy.

Evaluation: Based on attendance at lectures; attendance and participation in sections (including completion of section assignments) [25%]; one in-class midterm examination [25%]; one 500 word exercise producing a new treatment of High Noon [15%]; and one final paper of approximately 1000 words developing an argument or arguments related to the readings, films, and lectures. A set of suggested topics for the final paper will be provided approximately two weeks before the due date [35%].

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 272 / LING 272. Language in Society.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J. Dickinson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers students an introduction to linguistic anthropology, the study of language in social and cultural context. Some of the questions we will consider in this course include: What is "language," and why do anthropologists study it? How do our linguistic perceptions influence the ways we recognize social differences, such as those based on ethnicity, race, class, and gender? How do perceptions of language contribute to the transformation of social differences into relationships of unequal power? In pursuing these questions, we will cover a range of topics related to understanding how understandings of language contribute to the social construction of racial and ethnic identity, as well as discrimination based on these perceived differences. Most importantly, we will consider how divisions such as "grammatical" and "ungrammatical" or "educated" and "uneducated" are founded in social, rather than linguistic judgments. Some of the themes that recur throughout this course are: (1) Differences and similarities across languages and cultures, including language structures, language use, and patterns of language change; (2) the relationship between language and social life as seen in the interaction between language and social understandings of group membership, such as race, class and gender; (3) issues of language politics, including policies regarding bilingualism/multilingualism, the development and alteration of official and unofficial linguistic standards, and the social consequences of language change and language death. Throughout the course we will consider examples and case studies from the United States and throughout the world, with the goal of using comparisons to highlight differences and similarities across languages and communities. There are no prerequisites for this course. Requirements for the course include a midterm, a final, and a series of short assignments. The materials for this course include a textbook and articles that will be available on electronic reserve.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 285. Cult Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Young (lcyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Cult archaeology examines popular and fantastic interpretations of archaeological remains presented in the press and on television. We focus particularly on claims that cultural achievements by indigenous peoples are a consequence of contact with superior beings, such as aliens from outer space or other "more advanced" cultures. We will examine the logical flaws in these pseudoscientific explanations and the racist assumptions that underlie them. The goal of this course is for students to learn critical thinking skills that will enable them to assess popular interpretations of archaeological remains in the future, to understand ethical issues related to interpreting the past, and to recognize the harm of cultural racism. The course format is lecture and discussion sections. Evaluations are based on section exercises, participation, and two exams. The textbook is Kenneth L. Feder's Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries. A course pack and readings from web sites will supplement the text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001 Gender, Environment & Poverty. Meets with RC Social Sciences 360.002.

Instructor(s): Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 360.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 002 Danger and Disorder: An Anthropology of Crime.

Instructor(s): Ellen E Moodie (emoodie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will look at crime through anthropological lens, seeking new ways to understand a complicated, frustrating, and fascinating topic. It aims to interrupt "common-sense" talk as well as legalistic discourse and expose crime as a social construction carrying different meanings to different people and communities. Through the term we'll move around the globe among our likely stops Cameroon, Indonesia, England, Brazil, the United States, South Africa, Mexico, and the Trobriand Islands as we explore how crime is conceptualized in various cultures. We will watch films, read newspapers and book chapters, listen to popular music, and study ethnographies as we address a series of themes, including storytelling; racialized "others"; gender; urban space and policing; vigilantism and terrorism; law in non-Western cultures, and religion and morality. Class meetings will entail short lectures, discussions, films, guest speakers, and student presentations. Course requirements will include a take-home essay exam, writing assignments, and a short research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 309. Anthropology of Europe.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Carol Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing; introductory anthropology recommended. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will examine studies, issues, and debates in the vast field of European ethnology. Key concerns will be: what are the boundaries of European anthropology and a concept called "Europe"? How have anthropologists made intellectual decisions in the midst of global and local transformations, and given the explosion of cross-cultural interactions in and around the continent? Can we talk about a tradition of European anthropology and any kind of common identity among its practitioners? [Witness the active existence of such organizations as the European Association of Social Anthropologists]. Are European anthropologists necessarily European? Does the region studied have to be formally designated as Europe? What kinds of regional hierarchies exist within the discipline of anthropology? Finally, how do recent shifting identities, outbreaks of hate-mongering in parts of Europe, and so-called postmodern and postcolonial problems affect anthropological practices in the region? These and many other problems of European identity and culture will be discussed in this seminar. Grades will be based on class attendance and participation, successful completion of readings, a term paper, and two take-home exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 317 / REES 397. The Political Economy of Transformation in East Central Europe.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 Meets with REES 396.001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 396. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 397.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 320. Mexico: Culture and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will look at Mexican culture and society. In particular, it will address the question of how culture and national identity in Mexico have been historically and socially constructed over the past century. Since at least the 1920s, Mexican intellectuals have used the methods of cultural anthropology to define Mexican culture and national identity. These writers have been in only partial dialogue with U.S. anthropologists who have done ethnography in Mexico over the same period. We will draw on some of the key works written on Mexico and Mexicans from both sides of the border, and will test the limits of our ability to understand the powerful but elusive concept of Mexican culture. Themes to be covered include: the search for a Mexican identity; cultural variations among Mexicans; region, "race," and ethnicity in the construction of Mexican culture; gendered views of Mexicanness and Mexican culture; urban and rural views of the nation; and the disparate impact of globalization, transnational migration, and transculturation on Mexico.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 325. The Anthropology of Childbirth.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Meets with Women's Studies 253.003

Instructor(s): Elisha P Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines childbirth from an anthropological perspective, focusing on the distinctive sociocultural configurations of childbirth practices and beliefs in several different societies. The cross-cultural study of childbirth not only provides the basis for an understanding of the cultural logic underlying these practices and beliefs, but also expands our knowledge of women's perspectives on social change and on the medicalisation of childbirth. The course considers a range of childbirth-related topics including conception, the birthing process, childbirth rituals, postpartum care of mothers and newborns, fathers' participation, miscarriage and infant mortality, changing childbirth practices, and the politics of childbirth relating to hospitalization and reproductive technologies. The course using reading and videos from studies of childbirth in African, Asian, European, Latin American, and North American societies will be evaluated through one short paper, class participation, and a midterm and a final exam (with the option of a research paper).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 338. The Arts in Anthropological Perspective.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kelly M Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 222 or sophomore standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to anthropological perspectives on the arts. We will explore both current and historical models that consider the arts as objects/ events and social processes. Among the topics to be discussed are: aesthetics, representation, commercialization, art in the service of power (royal regalia, praise-singers, colonialism), embodied art, and art as a mode of resistance. Case studies will be drawn from regions around the world and encompass a variety of genres including music, dance, poetry, theater, and the visual arts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 339 / AMCULT 339. American Religious Movements.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The United States has a history of indigenous life, colonialism, and postcolonialism that is not dissimilar to many other countries throughout the world. Yet it also has a history of in- migration on a scale almost unmatched elsewhere, especially since the Immigration Reform Act of 1965. Even before the separations of church and state, nationally, then state by state, during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the search for religious freedom was one major reason spurring people to migrate to the United States. The steadily increasing diversity of religious experience in America, and its consequences for increased tolerance and conflict alike, are phenomena that most undergraduates are likely to be able to document in their own family histories. The purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduates to the astonishing religious diversity in the U.S., the surprising persistence of religious fervor, coexisting alongside a wide variety of secularist views, and to explore some analytical problems from an anthropological perspective. These problems will focus on the social organization of religious pluralism, especially cultural ideas and practices concerning tolerance and bigotry. We will also examine how religious beliefs and practices may extend far beyond the immediate confines of their institutional settings to affect other aspects of people's lives, including even the lives of people who are not members of those organizations, for example, through media representations. Specific topics will include: the separation of church and state and continuing debates about the place of religion in public life, especially politics; religious pluralism, tolerance, and conflict; leadership and social organization of new religious movements and how they are established as communities; cultural ideas and social practices concerning spirituality, divinity, ritual, morality, social justice; the role of print and other media in forming popular culture concerning religion; and debates about religion and science.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 356. Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Colonial Culture/Postcolonial History. Meet's with History 392.001.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In some places in the world, colonialism is hard to remember, in other places it's hard to forget. In 1945 one-third of the world's landmass was under some form of colonial rule. Despite formal decolonization throughout the world by the 1950s and 1960s (in India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Kenya, Senegal, Morocco,and Vietnam to name a few) some scholars would argue that "empire" and the models of domination developed during the 18th and 19th centuries continue to shape the distribution of goods, services and knowledge in the world today. How is it that literally billions of people could be dominated by such small numbers of colonizing countries throughout most of the 19th and 20th century? What is "post-colonialism"? Does it refer to the fact that colonialism is long over or the very opposite, that colonialism is alive and well in newly fashioned forms? What's the relationship between the rise of racism in France, Germany and England and the history of colonialism in these countries? If colonial power was in part based on the control and distribution of knowledge of which history-writing is a part how do we write colonial histories that don't reflect only the history of the "winners"?

This course looks at some of the shared features of colonial cultures in a range of different periods and different locations through the Americas, Asia, and Africa. It focuses on the broad social and racial policies of colonial rule and everyday sites of their implementation. We will look at who had sex with whom, where and when and why it mattered to those in the colonies who made policy. We will ask why domestic life was so important to those that ruled. We will look at the large and small scale forms of refusal and resistance that people mounted against powerful colonial regimes. The course will draw on films that mirror the continuing memory of colonial rule in people's visions of the world today. We will ask why colonialism matters in the contemporary world in some places more than others. In each case, we will read books that attempt to write new kinds of histories that attempt to understand how colonialism created both its colonizers and its colonized and that offer new ways of understanding the present because of the new ways we can look at the past. In short, this course familiarizes students with the political and cultural issues that arise in studying and identifying "the colonial" in the postcolonial world today.

Course requirements: a book review essay, weekly commentaries, a final research paper or essay exam. Books include: The Colonizer and the Colonized, Silencing the Past, Tensions of Empire, The Colonel and the Convict, Speaking with Vampires. For more information contact Professor Ann Stoler,astoler@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

ANTHRCUL 373. Articulating Gender: Women, Men, Speech.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: At least one course in Anthropology (Ethnology or Linguistic Anthropology), Linguistics, Women's Studies, or the Social Sciences. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the wake of popular therapeutic writing about sex differences and language in the United States, especially about miscommunication between men and women, certain assumptions about language and gender have become entrenched. In this coure, we will challenge those assumptions by exploring ways men and women speak in many societies around the world, and by asking how those ways of speaking intersect broader patterns and practices of social hierarchy and difference. Do men and women use language differently? Or do different expectations about who should speak how create our understandings of gender in the first place? We will read recent essays in the linguistic anthropology of gender, popular and therapeutic writing on men, women, and language, and occasionally analyze filmed dialog in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 381 / ACABS 382 / HISTART 382. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001 Meets with ACABS 686.001.

Instructor(s): Janet E Richards

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 382.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 386. Early Civilizations.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey R Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the long-term development of precolumbian Latin American civilizations, including the Aztec, Maya, and Inca. The geographic coverage extends northward from northwest Argentina and northern Chile, through the Andean and Amazonian regions of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia, and into Central America and Mexico. After a discussion of the general principles of cultural evolution, we consider a series of specific archaeological case studies that reflect prehistoric cultural change. We reflect on how these ancient societies may provide useful perspectives on some contemporary problems such as population pressure, ecological degradation, and ethnic conflict. No special background is assumed. There are three lectures and one discussion section per week. Students are evaluated primarily on the basis of three take-home essay exams. Textbook: Patterns in Prehistory, 3rd edition, by Robert J. Wenke, Oxford University Press; there will also be a small course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 387. Prehistory of North America.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 282. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are introduced to the diversity of prehistoric Native American cultures in North America, with emphasis on the Eastern Woodlands, Plains, Great Basin, and Southwest. Twelve thousand years of accommodations to diverse natural and social environments are covered, starting with the initial peopling of the Americas and ending with early contacts between Europeans and Native Americans. Topics of special interest include the extinction of mammoths, mastodons, and other megafauna at the end of the Pleistocene or "Ice Age"; changing hunter-gatherer adaptations leading to the independent domestication of several seed-bearing plants and the origins of agriculture; the development of organizationally complex societies, often called chiefdoms, in the Southeast and southern Midwest; and the devastating impact of European exploration and colonization on the cultures of Native North America. Requirements include three in-class "hourly" exams (there will be no final examination). Required readings include two texts and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 399. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 Honors Ethnology.

Instructor(s): Erik A Mueggler (mueggler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in a seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 399. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 002 Honors Archaeology.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Young (lcyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second half of the Honors sequence in archaeology (ANTHRCUL 398.002 is a prerequisite). Honors students will regularly meet as a group with the instructor to discuss the progress of their thesis, read each others work, and give constructive suggestions to each other. The majority of the term will be spent finishing data analysis, revising a research design, and writing a thesis. Oral presentations of thesis conclusions will be presented to a general audience at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 400 / CAAS 405. Field Studies.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin Holl

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (8). (Excl).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The field Studies course provides students with an opportunity to participate to a unique, original, and exciting research in West Africa. Students will be trained in fundamental methods and techniques of archaeological survey, excavation, artifact recording, data analysis, map drafting. They will participate in an ongoing research project of the "Dembala Valley Archaeological Project" (DeVAP) entitled "SETTLEMENT DYNAMICS, PRODUCTION, AND CRAFTS IN EASTERN SENEGAL." Field training is integrated with lectures on archaeological methods and theory, and the Archaeology of West Africa.

Data processing sessions introduce students to the analysis of archaeological artifacts, pottery, animal bones, stone tools, as well as plant remains. Each student is required to take notes on a daily basis that are read and commented on at the end of each week. The students will later use these notes to write an extensive 30-40 pages report. For those who may be interested a complementary "Archaeology Laboratory Studies" course is offered after the field season. In this sense, students will learn more about the long term curation of archaeological materials in museums contexts.

Course requirements include daily excavation notes and a 30-40 page research report. The intended audience is undergraduates with concentration in Anthropology, Archaeology, Afroamerican and African studies. Hours per week and Format are eight hours/day, five days/week, for ten weeks. Base: Tambacounda, Field Season: January 15 to March 20, 2002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 401 / CAAS 406. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin Holl

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in Anthro. 400. (6). (Excl).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course aims to train students in core archaeological processing of excavated remains. It involves restoration, description, drafting, as well as cataloging. Students must be concurrently enrolled in ANTHRCUL 400 in order to take this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 409. Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of anthropological approaches to the cultures of what is now called "the Middle East," a region extending from Morocco to Iran. Primary attention is given to Arabic-speaking, Muslim societies. We will examine enduring topics of interest, such as tribalism, kinship, gender, and Islam. We also will explore new problems (and styles of analysis) that call older interest into question. These include (trans)nationalism, mass culture, the political consequences of popular literacy, globalization, diasporas, and novel forms of ethnographic engagement with these topics. Finally, the course addresses the growing number of Middle Eastern communities that now live outside the region, with a special focus on Arabs in Detroit. Classes will include a mix of lecture and discussion, and readings will be drawn mostly from recent monographs. Grades will be based on two essays, with an additional short paper for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 420. Anthropology of Contemporary American Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Upton (rupton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in anthropology. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Anthropology 420 will address contemporary issues in American social life, including but not limited to, the meaning of the family and kinship, the concept of American "culture", religion, meanings and constructions of identity, class structure and the role of the body in everyday life. We will take as central the concept and construction of gender as a defining aspect for individuals in the U.S. and will use various media sources to explore and highlight these issues. We will examine what is meant by American "culture" itself and explore issues which surround "doing" anthropology in the United States. Students will be expected to be able to apply advanced concepts in anthropological discourse to these issues and two previous courses in Anthropology are required. Students will be evaluated based upon completion of short response papers, exams, and a final paper. Graduate students may take the course for Rackham credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 429. Television, Society, and Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Conrad P Kottak (ckottak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 438. Urban Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Carol Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What characterizes life in an urban society? What are the common features and/or variations between urban societies situated in different cultural and historical contexts? In addressing such questions, this course will be organized around two broad concerns: (1) the anthropology of cities: the main factors shaping the nature of urban life, the historical emergence of urban forms, and different forms of urbanism; and (2) anthropology in cities: examining themes such as social networks, class, gender, idioms of identity, and the status of institutions, with reference to specific ethnographic accounts. Topics will be addressed through lectures and classroom discussion and will be based on the reading of required texts. Assessment will be based on two take-home exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 444. Medical Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Holly Peters-Golden (hollypet@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 222. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The concepts of "health" and "illness" are culturally constructed. This course will examine beliefs about these states of being, and the ways in which they are both products and illustrations of the larger social system in which they are found. Ideas about the history of disease, social construction of the body, illness causation, therapies and therapists, healing symbols and rituals, and the social roles of patients and healers will be explored. In addition to examining these beliefs and processes cross-culturally, we also will draw upon examples from Western biomedicine among them cancer, AIDS, eating disorders, schizophrenia to illustrate the powerful ways in which illness and culture are bound together.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 447. Culture, Racism, and Human Nature.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in the social sciences. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 453 / CAAS 454. African-American Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women's rights, and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 457. The Film and Other Visual Media in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in cultural anthropology, American culture, women's studies, or film and video studies. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

New approaches to the study of film which focus on how cultural issues are represented, negotiated and contested in a wide range of documentary, ethnographic, and narrative films showing students how the construction of "otherness" and modern "selfhood" are played out in films. Moving from the "voyage out" to the "voyage in," the course parallels the way anthropology as a discipline has moved from an emphasis on differences to a desire to map points of contact and identification, and understand the otherness in our own midst.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Art and the Anthropological Imagination.

Instructor(s): Stephen Pastner

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taught by an anthropologist/sculptor, this course focuses on the analysis and production of narrative visual art that derives from, and itself informs, more traditional anthropological and historical scholarship an art genre commonly marginalized by both anthropologists and art-historians. The format of the course will combine lectures, group discussions, formal student presentations and art practicum elements. Evaluation criteria will, for most students, include production of a work of art based on scholarly research, and a paper and presentation describing its genesis and development. However, for the resolutely "left brained" who may wish to forego the art project, additional writing assignments will be possible. There will also be participation in one of several collaborative class presentations and the possibility of one or more exams/quizzes. In addition to the required texts and "course pack", students electing to do an art project should anticipate some art-materials expenses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Language & Socialization. Meets with Ling 492.005, Psych 551.001, and Ling 792.005.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Meek, Marilyn J Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on how language use relates to socialization into a group. We will examine this relationship with respect to topics such as identity formation, personhood, socioeconomic status, race, and cognition. We will read from the recent literature comparing these various aspects of socialization across different speech communities and then discuss questions such as the following. What kinds of (contextual, linguistic, developmental) constraints impact socialization? What is the nature of and how does the relationship between language and socialization vary across different contexts? Do the levels of analysis in the current research provide reasonable descriptions of both differences and similarities across contexts? We also will discuss where we would like to see future language-socialization research go. Along with class discussion, we will also participate in workshops sponsored by the Consortium on Language, Society, and Thought which has invited guest speakers to talk on topics related to our course. Upper-level or graduate student status is required. Some background in developmental or cognitive psychology, linguistics, cognitive or linguistic anthropology would be helpful. Course requirements include preparation for and active participation in class discussions, workshop attendance, and a paper on a topic related to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Muslims Under and After Socialism: Former Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe. Meets with AAPTIS 491.001, Asian Studies 380.001, AAPTIS 591.001, and History 449.001

Instructor(s): Morgan Liu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461 / LING 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore how Native North American languages are used in relation to the historical circumstances, cultural practices, and social settings of their speakers. Of particular concern is the interrelationship between linguistic practice and ideologies that can either promote or discourage the use (and maintenance) of these languages. We will focus on topics such as the relationship between language and landscape, oral narratives, language and thought, dominant/subordinate language contact situations, sign language, and literacy. No special background is required, but students should have upper-level or graduate student status. Course requirements include preparation for and active participation in discussions, three short book reviews, a midterm exam, and a paper on a topic related to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 489. Maya and Central American Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course emphasizes the archaeology and cultural evolution of the ancient Maya, whose civilization once extended from eastern Mexico through Guatemala and Belize into El Salvador and Honduras. Stages of development include hunters and gatherers, egalitarian villagers, emerging rank, and the state. Topics include religion, social organization, architecture, political hierarchies, subsistence strategies, settlement patterns, exchange systems, and hieroglyphic writing. The required textbook is Robert Sharer's, The Ancient Maya (available in paperback at Shaman Drum Bookstore, 313 South State Street). The grade is based on a paper (midterm) and on the in-class final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 541. Ecological Approaches in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Fricke (tomf@umich.edu), Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior, graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). Credit is granted for a total of six credits elected through Anthro. 541 and 586.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 553. Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: 400-level coursework in Anthropology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 572 / LING 542. Introduction to Sociolinguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Ling. 514 or graduate standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 542.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 577. Language as Social Action.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 576. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Develops a framework for viewing languages as a social, cultural, and political matrix, a form of action through which social relations, cultural forms, ideology, and consciousness are constituted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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