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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Civilization


This page was created at 8:00 AM on Wed, Oct 31, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 April 26)

Open courses in Classical Civilization
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Wolverine Access Subject listing for CLCIV

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Classical Civilization.

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The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CC 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CC 101 is offered in the Fall and CC 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Courses in this division do not require a knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are intended for students who wish to acquire knowledge of ancient literature, life, and thought, and of the debt modern civilization owes the Greeks and Romans.


CLCIV 102. Classical Civilization II: The Ancient Roman World (in English).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joseph D Reed (josephdr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What did it mean to be Roman in the Ancient World? Was it all about togas, orgies, and world conquest? Or anxiety, violence, and a propensity for self-destruction? This course will approach the issue of Roman identity from a variety of social, political, and philosophical angles. Using selected Roman historians (Livy, Tacitus) and poets (Catullus, Vergil, Ovid, and Lucan) as our guides, we will explore who the Romans thought they were, what position they felt their society occupied in the Mediterranean world and in the universe, and how their self-definition changed over time. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways in which the Romans constructed their past in order to understand who they were in the present. Grade will be based on exams, papers, and participation in discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 001 The "Smell of Litigation" in Classical Athens.

Instructor(s): Arthur Verhoogt (verhoogt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Classical Athens was a litigious city. Every citizen could litigate another citizen and argue his case before a court of fellow citizens. A number of speeches arguing for or against a case have survived. Most of them were written by ancient speech writers who could be hired to argue a case for you. As a rule, these speeches give only one side of the proceedings; the actual litigation (against which the surviving speech argues) or defense (replying to the surviving speech) have been lost in the course of the centuries.

During this course, students will be introduced to the litigation procedures in the Athens of the fifth and fourth centuries BC. With the help of texts in translation students will be asked to read and analyze actual speeches. What are the particulars of the case that is being argued? What sort of arguments are used? What rhetorical techniques are applied? Should we "believe" the arguments given by the speaker? The class will also discuss the other side of these speeches that has not survived. Is it possible to reconstruct the arguments given by the litigant or defendant? What are possible modern arguments that can be adduced to argue these 2400 year old cases? Each week students will discuss a case, read the ancient text, think about the other side, and finally give an argued "verdict".

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 002 The Spartan Mirage.

Instructor(s): Sara Forsdyke (forsdyke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The unique social and political system of ancient Sparta has fascinated outsiders from Herodotus to Hitler. Yet from the earliest period to the present, the image of Sparta has been an eclectic mix of fact and fiction.

Do you know which of the following unusual features of our image of ancient Sparta are fact and which are fiction?

  • The Spartan state gave every citizen an equal allotment of land, and made the men eat a simple food (black broth) in common messes or eating groups.
  • All luxury was banned (hence a modestly furnished dwelling is now said to be "Spartan").
  • The Spartans did not use money or writing, and were famously hostile to debate and discussion (hence the modern expression for a quiet person as "laconic", after the ancient name for Spartans, Lacedaimonians).
  • Spartan women underwent athletic training (in the nude) similar to men.
  • Young men were required to sleep in dorms with other men, and had to visit their wives secretly at night.
  • Men could share their wives with other men
  • Children were removed from their parents at age seven, and brought up by the state with strict military discipline.
  • Weak children were hurled off a mountain at birth.

The aim of this course will be to determine what we can know about what ancient Sparta was actually like and to explore the ways that the image of Sparta has been distorted over time. More generally, the case of Sparta will be used to discuss the ways that individuals and communities use and abuse the past to effect social and political goals in their own times.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 341. Classics and Cinema.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth S Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Classical antiquity and the movies have been closely associated for almost a century. This course will explore how (mostly Hollywood) cinema has represented the ancient past and its literature. Reading the ancient sources and seeing how films have transformed them, we will look especially at the hateful tyranny and attractive decadence of the movies' Roman Empire, which stands both for America's enemies (fascists, communists) and for what we fear about ourselves, in films such as Quo Vadis, Ben Hur, Spartacus, and Cleopatra as well as the fragmentary I,Claudius of 1937 and the pornographic Caligula of 1980. We will also examine the allure of the fabulous and primitive, in Pasolini's Medea, Jason and the Argonauts, Ulysses; at ancient texts as sources of inspiration in Rossellini's Socrates, Fellini's Satyricon, Kakoyannis' Tojan Women, and O Brother, Where are Thou; at comedy based on the conventions of representing antiquity such as Roman Scandals (1933) and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. There will be four short (4-page) papers, an hour exam, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 385(462). Greek Mythology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Given (jgiven@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Greek Mythology is designed to acquaint the student with the major myths and epic cycles of ancient Greece from the creation myths and their Near Eastern prototypes through the Trojan War and the wanderings of Odysseus. The development of various myths will be illustrated through Greek literature and art. At the focus of the course is the location of myth in Greek culture (religion, politics, art) as well as the reception of Greek myth in later traditions. We will consider a variety of theoretical approaches to myth from antiquity to recent structuralist and anthropological models. Required texts will include Morford and Lenardon, Classical Mythology, and selections from Homer, Hesiod, and Greek tragedy. An additional course pack will provide readings for discussion sections which will meet once a week to consider a variety of theoretical approaches to mythology, and other critical questions. Course requirements include two hour tests and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 389(467). The Good Life.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara L Rappe (rappe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the study of ethics through the ethical writings of Classical and Hellenistic philosophers. Emphasis will be placed on the later half of Greek ethics, on the questions that Aristotle, the Stoics, and the Epicureans raised concerning the origins of values in human life. What are the roles of such things as the virtues, pleasure, self-reflection, emotional maturity, etc., in the good life. What place do the emotions have in decision making? Is politeness of moral value? and so on...

Readings will include works by Aristotle, Plato, Lucretius, and Epictetus, as well as some contemporary writings by Freud, Jonathan Lear, MacIntyre, and Martha Nussbaum. Three short papers and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 480. Studying Antiquity.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): John F Cherry

Prerequisites & Distribution: Class. Civ. 101 or 102, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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This page was created at 8:00 AM on Wed, Oct 31, 2001.


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