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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in English


This page was created at 5:55 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 – April 26)

Open courses in English
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Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for English.

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ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 – Beginnings and Endings.

Instructor(s): Ilana M Blumberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will look at poems, plays, novels, and short stories, analyzing how their beginnings and endings adhere to and depart from conventional literary models. We will be particularly interested in narratives of love, education, and profession. Texts may include Charles Dickens' David Copperfield; Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth; Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre; poems of Robert Browning; poems of Christina Rossetti; and George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 – Love and Desire in Medieval Literature.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Medieval literature reveals the contradictory western invention of romantic love and sexual desire. Here we discover ideas about the sinfulness of sexuality, but also the acceptance of prostitution as a legal, civic enterprise. We learn that many diseases are thought to result from sexual intercourse, but also that intercourse is believed to be a remedy for some physical ailments.

In this seminar, we will investigate the challenges of understanding these and other conceptions of human sexuality – and explore the influence of medieval literature on our own time.

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ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 003 – Through the Eyes of Others.

Instructor(s): Helen Fox (hfox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Good, hard critical thinking about discrimination and poverty is almost impossible if we confine our minds within university walls. This experiential learning course gets you out into the community, working with kids or adults from impoverished backgrounds and talking with people from a wide variety of identity groups. These activities, along with reading novels and memoirs written from the point of view of people who have experienced discrimination and/or poverty, and writing about your questions, thoughts, and opinions in a variety of interesting formats will help you understand the challenges of "making it" in America today.

Time commitment: Volunteer work in Ann Arbor or Ypsilanti (two hours per week); mandatory participation in the University of Michigan's nationally acclaimed FIGS (First Year Interest Groups) Program (four meetings per term); class discussion and hands-on activities (no lectures); in-depth journal writing (2-4 pages per week); reading and writing about memoir and fiction (your choice of three books from an approved list); and several short papers, in several drafts, on topics chosen by the class.

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ENGLISH 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 001 – Masterpieces of Contemporary Gay Male Culture.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 002 – Regionalism.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brie Tiderington (bnt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Carrie Sue Sulzer (kayc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our class will examine the history of storytelling, and its many modern manifestations. Emphasis will be placed upon learning traditional forms before experimenting with them. Students will read various examples of storytelling at its best from around the world, along with essays on the craft from experienced storytellers. We will come to understand the revision of drafts as an indispensible facet of story writing. Much of our in-class time will be dedicated to collaborative workshopping of students' stories. We will also examine different forms of poetry, and consider rhythm and sound and expressive, precise word choice as vital elements of both poetry and prose. Over the course of the academic term students will be required to produce at least two polished stories and five to ten poems. Grades will be based mainly on class attendance and participation in workshops, and on the improvement shown in final portfolios. Other requirements may include a writing journal, a book review, or attendance at public readings.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Geoff Bankowski (bankwski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 004 – Poetry for Fiction Writers.

Instructor(s): Valerie Cumming (vcumming@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Darcie Dennigan (ddenniga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006 – Poetry and Screenwriting.

Instructor(s): Zachary Sifuentes (zsifuent@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 007 – Creative Writing: Dare-Devil Sport.

Instructor(s): Sarah Schuetze (sschuetz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Rae Gouirand (mgouiran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 009 – Crossing Genres, or How the Fiction Writer can Learn from Poetry and the Poet Benefit from Prose.

Instructor(s): Paul Durica (pdurica@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Ian Reed Twiss (reedtwis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 011 – The Annex Artist – Annexing Space Through the Word.

Instructor(s): Rosebud Lane (rlane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Kirsten Ratza (kmratza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the craft of writing both poetry and fiction. Using the workshop format, students will learn the basic compositions of both genres and the skill of critiquing their own and others' work. Students should expect to submit a minimum of five poems and ten pages of fiction in their final portfolio, all of which will undergo intensive revisions. A presentation on a contemporary writer is likely. Readings may include poems and stories by a variety of authors, including Anne Carson and Peter Ho Davies. We will also consider the current crop of writers who have just published first books, as well as the increasingly blurred "dividing line" between poetry and fiction.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Patricia Akhimie (pakhimie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Ryan Flaherty (pflahert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 015.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Ford (fords@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Phil Crymble (pcrymble@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pcrymble/syllabus.html

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s): Aric Knuth (aknuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 019.

Instructor(s): Sara Zettervall (szetterv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Ava Pawlak (pawlaka@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s): Sarah Wolfson (swolfson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 022.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Hilary Thompson (hthomps@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Charles Lavelle Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Kelly Allen (pulchela@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 007, 008 – Seeing and Believing.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher (ifulcher@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): James Crane

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Hilary Thompson (hthomps@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 011, 026 – American Myths, American Values.

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken (vlaken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 013.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Sara Talpos (sktalpos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 015, 025 – Argument, Persuasion, and Propaganda.

Instructor(s): Margaret Dean (mldean@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arguments are all around you: on bumper stickers, in clothing catalogues, on the website where you check the news, in the owner's manual for your car, on a t-shirt, in a memoir, on a menu, in a love letter. You've been evaluating arguments – and creating them – since before you could talk.

In this course, we will hunt down arguments in their natural habitats: in newspapers and magazines, on the radio and TV, on the web, on billboards, in courses at the university, and in conversations among friends. We will pick them apart, figure out how they work, and talk back to them. You will use your expanded and deepened understanding of argument to create stronger, subtler, and more effective arguments of your own: expect to write and revise three formal arguments totalling 15-30 pages, and numerous informal assignments, including regular participation of an online discussion group.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 017 – Personal Ideas/Social Action.

Instructor(s): Anne Berggren (agbergrn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 018, 019.

Instructor(s): Scott Hutchins (smhutchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All writing is built, in part, of argument. In fact, every conscious move we make argues some precept, from the reliability of the power grid (flicking on a light switch) to the appropriateness of certain kinds of dress (wearing shoes to class). This course will focus on the recognition, analysis, critique, and production of arguments, implicit and explicit, large and small. For texts, we will look to essays, op-ed pieces, articles, fiction, movies, advertisements, and, most important, your and your fellow students' writing. We will study the rhetoric of argument, but we will focus on its practice. Requirements will include in-class writing exercises, short presentations, and several college-length essays with revisions.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 020, 021.

Instructor(s): Randall L Tessier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 022.

Instructor(s): Sara Talpos (sktalpos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 024.

Instructor(s): Jason Kirk (jckirk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 025 – Argument, Persuasion, and Propaganda.

Instructor(s): Margaret Dean (mldean@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 225.015.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 026 – American Myths, American Values.

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken (vlaken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 225.011.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 027.

Instructor(s): Peggy Adler (adlerp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 028.

Instructor(s): Jason Kirk (jckirk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 029.

Instructor(s): Shubha Venugopal (shubha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 031.

Instructor(s): Peggy Adler (adlerp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 227 / THTREMUS 227. Introductory Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 227.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott J Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Patrice Marie Rubadeau

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 001 – The Comic Novel: From Swift to Beckett.

Instructor(s): James McNaughton (jmcnaug@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to give the student an introduction to the development and rise of the novel as a social phenomenon by analyzing how the novel comically treats both other novels that precede it and the continued influx of popular writing that has accompanied the novel since its beginning. The student will learn to recognize and analyze concepts fundamental to comic literature such as parody and pastiche, satire and irony. Yet more importantly the student will learn to analyze the continued struggle between "high" and "low" art that forms a principle tension in comic novels from the eighteenth century through to our present day. The comic novel often attempts to elevate itself above other books by laughing at, mocking, and deriding popular publications; this, while the novel itself is a supposedly democratic or bourgeois art form. We will ask when if ever the novel succeeds in distancing itself from the popular press and what that means for the novel's readership and purpose. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we will enjoy a good laugh with some fantastically funny books.

Readings include Gulliver's Travels, Tale of a Tub, Pamela (selections), Joseph Andrews, Tristam Shandy, Bouvard and Pecuchet, At Swim Two Birds, and Molloy.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 002 – Vampires, Desire, and Fiction.

Instructor(s): Sarah Frantz (frantzsj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will learn about the mechanics of narrative – plot, character, theme, genre, style, voice – and the skills of literary analysis, by examining the myth of the vampire. We will begin with the ancient vampire myths from the Far East and India, move to those of Eastern Europe, continue by examining the eighteenth-century European vampire panics, read Polidori's Romantic Vampyre, examine Bram Stoker's Dracula, and finally analyze twentieth-century popular incarnations of the vampire myth in novels (Anne Rice, Stephen King, Christine Freehan), film (Nosferatu, Bram Stoker's Dracula), TV (Buffy), on the web, and in popular culture (vampire balls). We will investigate how culture, historical time, and gender play a role in the vampire myth. How and why does the vampire myth change depending on the particular fears or desire of a people, country, or time? How do desire and fear combine and interact in the vampire myth?

Requirements for class: class participation, web-based conferencing, weekly response papers, two papers of 5-6 pages each, a final in-class (optionally collaborative) presentation.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 003 – Villains and Criminals: Reading "Other-ness".

Instructor(s): Tonya Howe (thowe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Yet there is a mystery here and it is not one that I understand: without the sting of otherness, of – even – the vicious, without the terrible energies of the underside of health, sanity, sense, then nothing works or can work. I tell you that goodness – what we in our ordinary daylight selves call goodness: the ordinary, the decent – these are nothing without the hidden powers that pour forth continually from their shadow sides….
– Doris Lessing

Why are literary villains repeatedly depicted as ethnic 'Others,' women, or those whose sexual preferences deviate from a presumed norm? In Unbreakable, a recent film by Manoj Shyamalan, Samuel L. Jackson explains the representational logic of the comic book villain by pointing out the "elongated head" and "protruding lips" of the evildoer, his "darker skin" and "animalistic appearance." Clearly, these can be read as offensive physical stereotypes of ethnicity. What do you think the hero of this film looks like? This course will examine a variety of fictional texts – work by Wells, Beckett, Anand, Shelley, O'Connor, and others – in order to understand the ways authors have represented difference as a form of criminality. One of the goals of this class is to develop a repertoire of analytical tools for the effective, thoughtful study of fiction. Written work will include two 5-7 page essays, weekly 1-page personal responses, and a final exam covering the essential concepts of literary analysis.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 004 – Making Meaning in a World Turned Upside Down.

Instructor(s): Tim Murnen (tmurnen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 005 – Between the Long Story and the Short Novel.

Instructor(s): Louis Cicciarelli (lcicciar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

There are long short stories that read like novels and short novels that have the feel of short stories. Discussing works that fall between categories offers distinct opportunities to explore the form of both the short story and the novel, as well as the territory of the novella. This course will examine a wide range of "in between" 20th century works with the goal of using form as a way to define particular characteristics of literature and encounter works that often resist categorization. Using these works to illuminate the boundaries between current categories will allow us to explore and interpret these boundaries across a wide range of writers and fictions. Readings will include works by Stephen Crane, James Joyce, Eudora Welty, Nella Larsen, Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, William Maxwell, Philip Roth, William Trevor, Toni Morrison, Alice Munro, Denis Johnson, Lorrie Moore, and Charles Baxter among others.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to be an author, to create a story? To figure that out, we'll be authors ourselves a little and ask about our own responses as readers. We'll read texts closely, attempting to understand their less accessible meanings, the effect of the social and economic context in which they are written and read, and what's at stake for us, if anything, in the content. We'll be interested in the social purposes of literature and in questions of authors' responsibilities. We'll read or view The Official Story, Interviews with My Lai Veterans; Wiesenthal's The Sunflower; Coetzee's Age of Iron; Thomas' The White Hotel; Kingsolver's Pigs In Heaven; Washington's Iron House; Cervantes' Emplumada; and Shange's "spell #7." Class participation will be important, and you'll write 25 pages worth of essays and literature, the nature of which we'll determine together. No exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 002 – Telling Stories: The Art of Narration.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is it about being human that so encourages us "to tell" our stories to others? I have to wonder about how our futures depend on "seeing" and articulating small glimpses of our past. We will want, in this class, to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example a character in Ursula Hegi's Stones From the River thinks: Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone.

Our readings will often focus on the dynamics of the imaginative process – our own as well as the author's. As the term continues and we discuss various 20th century literature (mostly), we will find ourselves grappling with issues as basic as how an author creates these amazing characters to tell their own stories, their own lives.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 003 – Literature of the Americas.

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do perceptions of "The Americas" differ, or converge, in the United States and Cuba, in Trinidad and Argentina, in Haiti and Brazil? What accounts for the ways in which "America" is thereafter translated into "Literature"? And how is this clarified by the narratives and plays and poetry that we get in, say, Nash Candelaria's Memories of the Alhambra and Jo Sinclair's The Changelings; in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, Earl Lovelace's "Jobell and America" and Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint? We'll explore similar issues when we read Rosario Ferre's "When Women Love Men" and Hisaye Yamamoto's Seventeen Syllables. So too when we turn to Alejo Carpentier's Concierto Baroque, Derek Walcott's O Babylon!, and Jonathan Edwards' "Sinners in the Hand of an Angry God."

These apparently similar and yet opposed stories about "America": what do they teach us about how "Literature" is defined in different places? And by whom? How does a Flannery O'Connor ("A Good Man Is Hard to Find") get to be important, or forgotten, in one context, an Austin Clarke Growing Up Stupid Under the Union Jack in another, and a Herman Melville Bartleby, the Scrivener in yet another part of the New World?

Note: preceded by short informal reports (1-2 pages) on each reading, the "Final" for this course will be a comparative essay on any two of the regions that we'll cover during the academic term.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 004 – Literature of the Americas.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do perceptions of "The Americas" differ, or converge, in the United States and Cuba, in Trinidad and Argentina, in Haiti and Brazil? What accounts for the ways in which "America" is thereafter translated into "Literature"? And how is this clarified by the narratives and plays and poetry that we get in, say, Nash Candelaria's Memories of the Alhambra and Jo Sinclair's The Changelings; in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, Earl Lovelace's "Jobell and America" and Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint? We'll explore similar issues when we read Rosario Ferre's "When Women Love Men" and Hisaye Yamamoto's Seventeen Syllables. So too when we turn to Alejo Carpentier's Concierto Baroque, Derek Walcott's O Babylon!, and Jonathan Edwards' "Sinners in the Hand of an Angry God."

These apparently similar and yet opposed stories about "America": what do they teach us about how "Literature" is defined in different places? And by whom? How does a Flannery O'Connor ("A Good Man Is Hard to Find") get to be important, or forgotten, in one context, an Austin Clarke Growing Up Stupid Under the Union Jack in another, and a Herman Melville Bartleby, the Scrivener in yet another part of the New World?

Note: preceded by short informal reports (1-2 pages) on each reading, the "Final" for this course will be a comparative essay on any two of the regions that we'll cover during the academic term.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What we call "family" is often based on our own experience. In this class we will explore various concepts of "family" through reading novels and short stories. As we read Ron Hansen's Atticus, Toni Morrison's Sula, Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping, Michael Cunningham's Flesh and Blood, Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, and selected short stories, we will look at how notions of "family" are affected by gender, sexuality, race, and class. There will be three in-class essays. Class participation is essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 006 – Race and Literature.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Looking specifically at works by writers who represent and/or discuss multiple racial backgrounds and identifications, this course asks such questions as: How do race, class, and gender shape our ideas about literature? How is race – and specifically, African American identity – constructed in these works? Who is this literature for? How do legal definitions of color shape a specific writer's presentation of race? What does this literature tell us about power? How might each of us read a literary work differently, and why? Using Claudia O'Hearn's Half and Half: Writers on Growing Up Biracial and Biracial as our starting point, we will read such works as Harriet Jacob's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, James Weldon Johnson's The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Nella Larsen's Quicksand, William Faulkner's Go Down Moses, Lillian Smith's Strange Fruit, James MacBride's The Color of Water, and Gus Lee's China Boy. In addition to viewing in class the controversial film Jefferson in Paris, students will attend (at reduced cost) the Feb. 17th (Sunday afternoon) performance of From the Diary of Sally Hemings, a new song cycle based on the story of Sally Hemings, the (enslaved) mistress of Thomas Jefferson. Students will be evaluated on class participation and several short (3-4 page) papers.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to key terms and practices in the study of literature. This section of "What is Literature?" will combine the study of the genres poetry, short story, novel, play, and film with an introduction to critical perspectives such as psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism, linguistics, new historicism, and cultural studies. We will read Shakespeare, Blake, Whitman, Keats, Cisneros, Joyce, Mansfield, Wharton, Faulkner, Morrison, and Hwang, and view the films Bladerunner and Law of Desire. We will familiarize ourselves with issues relating to form, gender and sexual identity, ethnicity, representation, colonialism, narration, and commodity culture. Expectations: 3 papers (one 2-3 page paper, one 3-5 page paper, one 5-7 page paper), weekly quizzes, presentations, enthusiastic participation, and regular attendance.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollacl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Through close readings and analyses of a wide variety of short stories, we will develop a deep understanding of how this form works and gain insights into the ways in which all forms of fiction are written and received. Elements to be discussed include characterization, voice, style, structure, dialogue, setting, point of view, and theme. In addition to reading stories for every class, students will be required to keep a reading journal and write a four-to-six page critical essay and a five-to-ten page short story.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 009 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 010 – Honors.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/english/239/009.

What a story means has a lot to do with how it's told. In this section of "What is Literature," we will explore some essential questions of contemporary literary discourse through the consideration of narrative and the delights and implications of story-telling. Using as our main source what D.H. Lawrence called "the great book of life," the novel, we will look at the varied strategies authors employ to present their stories to their readers and how those strategies reflect the writers' ideology and culture. Writers speak to their culture, and thus we will situate our texts within the culture that produced them to examine the specifics of this interaction. I have chosen some of my favorite stories from some of my favorite authors – including possibly Woolf, Spiegelman, Hemingway, Brontë, O'Brien, Morrison, Alexie, and Banks and other, less-known contemporary writers. Requirements: two essays, a midterm, and a final; contributions to the discussion of class texts on the computer conference (COW); regular attendance, and active class participation in discussion.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 012 – Literature of the Americas.

Instructor(s): Patricia Smith Yaeger (pyaeger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do perceptions of "The Americas" differ, or converge, in the United States and Cuba, in Trinidad and Argentina, in Haiti and Brazil? What accounts for the ways in which "America" is thereafter translated into "Literature"? And how is this clarified by the narratives and plays and poetry that we get in, say, Nash Candelaria's Memories of the Alhambra and Jo Sinclair's The Changelings; in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, Earl Lovelace's "Jobell and America" and Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint? We'll explore similar issues when we read Rosario Ferre's "When Women Love Men" and Hisaye Yamamoto's Seventeen Syllables. So too when we turn to Alejo Carpentier's Concierto Baroque, Derek Walcott's O Babylon!, and Jonathan Edwards' "Sinners in the Hand of an Angry God."

These apparently similar and yet opposed stories about "America": what do they teach us about how "Literature" is defined in different places? And by whom? How does a Flannery O'Connor ("A Good Man Is Hard to Find") get to be important, or forgotten, in one context, an Austin Clarke Growing Up Stupid Under the Union Jack in another, and a Herman Melville Bartleby, the Scrivener in yet another part of the New World?

Note: preceded by short informal reports (1-2 pages) on each reading, the "Final" for this course will be a comparative essay on any two of the regions that we'll cover during the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Reginald McKnight (regmck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 016 – Topic?

Instructor(s): Patricia Yaeger , Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu), Arlene Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use a course pack of selected poems. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we shall study closely a variety of poems written in English from about 1600 to the present. The task of the course is a pleasurable and progressive understanding of how poems work, that is, what techniques poets use to articulate their visions of experience. We shall pay close attention to the language, forms, figures, and themes of verse, to literary-historical conditions that influence poetic craft, and to the intertextual connections that create constellations of poems across the centuries. The textbook, Norton Introduction to Poetry (seventh edition) by J. Paul Hunter, will be our chief reading, in addition to handouts. Because this is a discussion class, regular attendance and participation are required. Other requirements include a series of short papers, supplemented by a reading journal, a midterm, and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Andrea Kelly Henderson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide an introduction to poetry, emphasizing the association of form and content and their link to the historical context in which poems were originally written. Our poets will range from Shakespeare to T.S. Eliot. The course will, for the most part, be organized chronologically, but we will on occasion trace certain themes, techniques, and forms as they appear in a cluster of poems of different periods. We will also use other cultural artifacts to illuminate the workings of the poems of particular eras. The class will discuss, for instance, the common features of Renaissance poems and paintings, and the relationship between twentieth-century impressionism and the poetry of Wallace Stevens. Course requirements include active class participation, several short papers, and a final exam.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Richard L Hilles (rhilles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Ejner J Jensen (ejjensen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, a prerequisite for concentrators in English, is an introduction to English and American poetry. In this section, students will read a wide variety of poems drawn from WESTERN WIND, ed. J.F. Nims. I shall be organizing the course according to poetic kinds or themes, working chronologically within each category. Occasional brief lectures will serve to direct and focus discussion, which will be the primary method of instruction. Student responsibilities in the course include the following: three or four in-class writing exercises, one or two oral reports, a long end-of-term essay, and a final examination. Regular class attendance is required, and each student's contribution to class discussion will be a factor in the assignment of grades.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006 – (Honors).

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this section of English 240, we will focus on the meaning of poetic form. Reading a wide variety of poems, from different periods and places, we will explore the following questions: how do poems ask us to read them? what do poems do to ordinary language? how do the forms in which poems are written become meaningful? We will begin our reading in and around The Norton Anthology of Poetry, moving through a series of units designed to raise and explore some of the questions above; we will then read several short volumes of twentieth-century poetry together, including perhaps Elizabeth Bishop's Geography III and Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah. Students will be expected to read carefully, participate enthusiastically in class discussion, and write four papers.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Nancy S Reinhardt (nsreinha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Catherine Sanok (sanok@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Ted Chamberlin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Poetry 240 is a course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in certain fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at – and hear – poems, we shall consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene. Texts: an introduction to poetry book and an anthology, both in course pack form. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Lutman (jlutman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Raymond McDaniel (raymcd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 245 / RCHUMS 280 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E.J. Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edith K Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001 – American Voices.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One of the major themes in American literature is the "Americanization" of members of the various racial, religious, and ethnic groups within American society. This section of English 270 will follow the theme of Americanization beginning with Nathaniel Hawthorne, one of the writers in the traditional American canon, and continuing with novels and short stories from other American voices and talents including women, Chicano, Asian-, African-, Native- and European-American writers, selections which more fully represent "American" or United States literature. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion, and all students are expected to read and be prepared to discuss the works in class. Requirements also include weekly reading responses, a final, and two short 4-5 page papers.

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ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 308. History of the English Language.

Section 001 – Satisfies the requirement for a course in language for English concentrators in the Teaching Certificate Program and the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our language has changed dramatically in the twelve hundred years of its recorded history. We would not recognize speech (Old English) of the first Germanic peoples who migrated to post-Roman Britain in the fifth century; Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (Middle English) might seem to be written in a foreign language; even Shakespeare's (early Modern) English requires special efforts. Our main task will be to understand something of sounds, words, and structure of English at each of these earlier periods, but especially we will work to understand why and how a language changes (or doesn't). Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, group tasks, in class workshops, a midterm, and a final. The major prerequisite is that you come prepared to have fun.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 – Ancient Greece and Modern Gay Identity. Meets with Comparative Literature 372.002.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 010 – Science Fiction.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~esrabkin/313SFw02.htm

We will examine both the history and the diversity of science fiction prose by reading a representative international sampling of some of the best examples written since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Generally, we will approach each primary text in three ways: through a consideration of its backgrounds (scientific, mythic, and so forth), through specific questions the text raises (moral questions, questions of plausibility, and so forth), and through the traditional discipline of criticism (what is science fiction? what is the relationship of character to theme? and so forth). The written work for the course will revolve around weekly, short papers, and two longer papers. There are no exams. Authors studied include Mary Shelley, Poe, Hawthorne, Wells, Zamiatin, Capek, Stapledon, Bradbury, Clarke, Miller, Dick, LeGuin, Lem, and Gibson.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 – Women and Novels.

Instructor(s): Ilana Blumberg (blumberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will investigate the relationship between women and novels. Beginning in the late seventeenth century and making our way into the early twentieth, we will explore the ways women's lives have been imagined by female and male novelists. At the same time, we will consider how developments in print technology and publication practices shaped both the genre of the novel and the role of women as authors, readers, and subjects of fiction.

Readings may include: Aphra Behn, Oronooko; Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders; Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey; George Eliot, Mill on the Floss; Charles Dickens, David Copperfield; George Gissing, New Grub Street; Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 002 – Women and Space.

Instructor(s): Anne C Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the relationship between women and space in twentieth century writings by women as a way of addressing questions of geography and identity. As elite women experience greater mobility, how do they represent their voluntary migrations? How do interiors continue to locate female experience? How do dislocations, the result of immigration or travel, result in the relocations of female identities within written narratives? How are spatial metaphors used to describe the place of the woman writer in culture? Primary texts include Woolf's A Room of One's Own, Dinesen's Out of Africa, Ehrlich's The Solace of Open Spaces, Cather's The Professor House, Cisnero's The House on Mango Street, Yamada's Camp Notes, Brookner's Hotel du Lac, and Kincaid's A Small Place. Assignments involve several short essays and either a midterm/final or a paper and its revision.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 003 – Women Poets & Feminist Critics.

Instructor(s): Johanna H Prins (yprins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Over the past three decades, feminist critics have turned to women poets to explore questions about female subjectivity, to construct alternative literary traditions, and to imagine the possibilities for a feminist poetics.

In this course, we will read women's poetry from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries alongside recent critical essays, in order to analyze and historicize different ideas about "the woman poet." We will consider how and why particular women poets (such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Emily Dickinson, H.D., Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Eavan Boland, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Rita Dove) have become significant figures within feminist literary criticism.

Our goal throughout the academic term will be to develop critical skills and appreciation for the complexity of writing in (and on) poetry by women. Course requirements will include two 7-8 page papers, several informal writing assignments, participation in a student panel, and regular attendance. No final exam.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 – Cross-Racial Writing.

Instructor(s): Reginald McKnight (regmck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 – Women, Autobiography, and the Medical Body.

Instructor(s): Sidonie A Smith (sidsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 318. Literary Types.

Section 001 – Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama.

Instructor(s): Nancy S Reinhardt (nsreinha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

After the restoration of Charles II to the throne in 1660, theatres reopen with renewed vitality. Women are now included on the public stage, and brilliant new plays explore themes of gender and society. Throughout the eighteenth century, London theatres continue to thrive, reflecting changing social attitudes and concerns. We will examine these attitudes, the role of women, the rise of the star system, the significance of the actor-manager, and power of the box office. We will also look at changes in stagecraft, especially those that reflect international influences imported from France and Italy. Representative dramatists will include Dryden, Wycherley, Etherege, Behn, Cibber, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Farquhar, Gay, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. Requirements include a research project, a midterm, and a final exam.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 – Theatre and Social Change.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches students how to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth and of incarcerated youth and adults. In-class exercises, improvisations, and discussion of theater and pedagogical texts prepare us to assist workshop participants in imagining and shaping their own plays. Students will work an average of two to three hours a week in one of a number of state correctional facilities located in Adrian, Jackson, Ypsilanti, and Plymouth, at Henry Ford or Cooley High School in Detroit, or at one of three juvenile facilities. An additional two hours is spent in class meetings, and a further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell Hall for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 – Poetry.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a poetry section; we will spend the academic term, in the workshop and in tutorials, discussing the craft and techniques of verse. There will be assigned exercises, but for the most part each student will work independently to develop the voice and style(s) most congenial to his or her talent. Students will keep a journal devoted mainly to their reading of poems and essays about poetry. At least one anthology will provide opportunities for conversations about contemporary poetics. Active participation in class discussion is an essential requirement of this course. Must submit a 10-15 page portfolio by noon on January 7 to 3187 AH.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002, 003, 004 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Nancy Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Timothy Liu

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Scholten

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 – The Dwarf, the Demon, and the Divided Self.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002 – Technical Writing.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Technical" writing is not necessarily "scientific" writing; rather, it refers to the dissemination of knowledge that is the territory of experts or specialists. As you pursue a major, you are developing an area of expertise, becoming a specialist; thus, your work in this class will reflect your own educational and professional interests. The emphasis in technical writing is on recognizing your audience, developing a persuasive and readable voice, and writing with specificity. Discussions and assignments will include letters of application and resumes, grant proposals, informative essays, and a longer research project. We will be reading, discussing, writing (and rewriting), critiquing, and workshopping. You will find this writing-intensive course most valuable if you have a specific project on which you are ready to focus.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003 – Writing for Life: Community Writing.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This upper-level English course asks that students do weekly volunteer work at a local non-profit organization (list provided). While all students will be asked to do some writing for their community partners – for instance, contribute to a grant proposal, newsletter, website, or brochure – our course's primary focus will be on the student's interactions with and responses to his/her work site. In our class meetings, we will discuss issues raised by our community work and by several related, assigned readings – such as our motives and presuppositions; our respective roles as outsider and insider; the new listening, interactive, and organizational skills that may be required; and our community partners' often differing agenda and goals. We will also use class time to workshop and group-edit all of the required community-related assignments. In addition to keeping a weekly reflective journal, students will do some modest research that culminates in an oral report and larger paper that combines personal and analytical styles of discourse. Course grade will be based on the student's writings, class participation (including the oral reports), and a reasonable but consistent time commitment at the community site.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004, 005.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist concentrating in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy concentrator reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo – be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Stefan Senders

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 007 – A Nation of Immigrants.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Central to the myth of the American Dream is the construct of the immigrant, those "tired" and "poor," welcomed to our shores, expecting to find "streets paved with gold," and "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" limited only by their own energy and desire. Not surprisingly, some of America's most compelling literature is about and by immigrants who write of the promise and disappointment of that dream and of the inevitable conflicts between old world ethics and new. This composition class will make their writings and the essays you compose in response to their ideas its focus. We will read texts by Alvaraz, Rodriguez, Doctorow, Morrison, Alexie, Hong Kingston, Chang-Rae Lee, and other professional writers – and by the writers in this class. Requirements include three 6-8 page essays, responses to each others' essays, active participation in class discussion, and regular attendance.

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ENGLISH 327 / THTREMUS 327. Intermediate Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Engl. 227. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 330(412) / FILMVID 330. Major Directors.

Section 001 – Ingmar Bergman and Woody Allen.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: F/V 230 or 236. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 330.001.

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ENGLISH 331(413) / FILMVID 331. Film Genres and Types.

Section 001 – Interior Vision: The Subjective Camera in Narrative Film.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: F/V 230 or 236. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 331.001.

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ENGLISH 349(449) / THTREMUS 323. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 323.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 351. Literature in English after 1660.

Section 001 – Pictures of Modern Identity. Meets the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Tobin Anthony Siebers (tobin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tobin/html/E351.html

Who invented you? What does it mean to be you, or any one person, apart from others of your kind? The works we will be studying are the building blocks of our concepts of identity. They provide a diverse picture of who we are and what we do: the self as castaway or genius, as solitary thinker or alienated victim, as moral superior or criminal. We will read works both of great artistic innovation and of the popular imagination, our one requirement being that they have had a lasting impact on the way we imagine ourselves. Works include Robinson Crusoe, Gulliver's Travels, The Lyrical Ballads, Mansfield Park, Walden, Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde, The Wasteland, A Room Of One's Own, The Invisible Man, In Cold Blood. Two lectures and one discussion weekly. Requirements are three papers, midterm, and final.

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ENGLISH 367 / MEMS 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie J Traub ( traubv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 – Masterworks of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 – History of Early English Poetry. Satisfies the Pre-1600 English concentration requirement

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

After a brief survey of English prose from the 14th to the 18th Century, we shall study the following forms from the same period: alliterative verse, rhymed couplets, various stanza forms, sonnets, and blank verse (narratives and plays). The emphasis will be on shifts of style through time, on trying to define and explain these shifts in terms of cultural forces and authorial talents. Poets will include Langland, Chaucer, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, and Pope. Everyone will need to learn to read Middle English, to scan verse, and to gain familiarity with various terms for characterizing poetic style. Everyone will be asked to engage in detailed textual analysis as well as to write on broader issues. Required texts: The Norton Anthology of Literature, Vol. I, and a course pack.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 003 – Self and Society in Early English Literature (Honors). Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001 – (Honors).

Instructor(s): Simon E Dickie

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002 – Revolution to Revolution.

Instructor(s): Mark A Koch (markkoch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey the literature of two of the most turbulent and formative centuries in the history of the English-speaking world with a particularly keen eye on political and social change. We will begin by briefly considering key literary, political, philosophical, and religious ideas during the reign of King Charles I and the Interregnum and how they reveal the imminent tension and upheaval in English society. We will study parts of John Milton's epic Paradise Lost within the context of the English civil turmoil and read John Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel. Next, we will explore several works about colonialism in the New World, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, and the fourth part of Jonathan's Swift's Gulliver's Travels. After observing the changing culture of literacy in the eighteenth century, we will read John Gay's The Beggar's Opera (a satiric, riotous play), Samuel Richardson's Pamela (often considered the first fully realized novel), and Oliver Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield (a classic novel of sentiment). There will be a consideration of the link between Sentimental literature and the ideas of the American and French Revolutions as well as Mary Wollstonecraft's The Rights of Woman. Finally, we will read certain poems by William Blake, William Wordsworth, and other Romantic poets. Course work will consist of two exams, three formal papers (totaling about twenty pages), and constant, dutiful reading.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 – What Was Modernism?

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore Modernism – the style/movement that dominated the "high" art of the first decades of this century. While we will read a few poems (Eliot, Yeats) and glance briefly at some of the art and music, the focus of the course will fall primarily on fiction. Works to be read include Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Mann's Death in Venice, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist, Kafka's The Metamorphosis, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. Course grades will depend on two essay exams, frequent short, informal writing assignments, and two five page analytical papers. Regular attendance is essential.

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ENGLISH 381 / AMCULT 324. Asian American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to key texts of Asian Pacific American Literature. Our study of writers such as Maxine Hong Kingston, David Wong Louie, Toshio Mori, Bharati Mukherjee, Jessica Hagedorn, Carlos Bulosan, Milton Murayama, Lois-Ann Yamanaka, and Nora Okja Keller will be discussed in ways that reveal the complexity of the category Asian Pacific American, the ways in which notions of Asian American identity typically grounded in questions of immigration, assimilation, and cultural nationalism are complicated by paradigms of colonization. This course examines the ways in which studying the literature of Asian Pacific America reveals the contradictions of both U.S. "exceptionalism" at home as well as abroad.

And, in this way, this course turns the study of Asian American literature to questions of U.S. empire, neocolonialism, and globalization. Requirements include midterm and final exams, one 3-5 page paper, one 7-8 page paper.

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ENGLISH 383. Topics in Jewish Literature.

Section 001 – Constructing American Jewish Literature. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This new course will use a comparative approach to constructing a tradition of Jewish literature in our country during the last century. We will study the literature both in itself and as a paradigm for contemporary debates about cultural hybridity, assimilation, and ethnicity. Our reading will mix familiar and unfamiliar names (and why so many Jewish writers remain outside the canon will be one question we shall ask). We begin with neglected authors of late 19th century such as Emma Lazarus, use Israel Zangwill (author of the play The Melting Pot, which made that phrase popular) as our transition point, and turn to successive generations of Jewish-American authors, such as Abraham Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, Henry Roth, Arthur Miller, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, Allen Ginsberg, and Wendy Wasserstein. Contemporary readings on Anti-Semitism, economic and educational history, and cultural theory will help us explore the problematic nature of group identity within a complex society. Written work will include weekly response paragraphs, a midterm, a term paper (8 pages), and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 401 / RELIGION 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential.

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ENGLISH 408 / LING 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 – Middle English. Meets with English 503.001. Satisfies the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors – Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. [Although this course follows up on material covered in English 407 (reading Old English), 407 is not a prerequisite.]

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ENGLISH 414. Multimedia Explorations in the Humanities.

Section 001 – Multimedia Explorations.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mmx/w02/414w02syl.htm

MULTIMEDIA EXPLORATIONS offers students the opportunity to work in groups creating and/or augmenting web-based resources for the study of a humanities topic of their choice. Students may register in groups with the mentorship of any collaborating faculty member or register singly and form partnering and, if needed, mentoring relationships. All students will study in the field of their chosen group, learn modern information technology, and use that technology to produce materials that become part of on-going resources for use by themselves and others. Reading, writing, and production requirements will be adjusted to the backgrounds of each student and the needs of each group. A typical minimum requirement is the equivalent of reading five books in the field of choice (e.g., 18th century satire or The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood), mastering at least three substantial programs (e.g., Flash or Photoshop), and producing the multimedia equivalent of 30 pages of revised, researched prose.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 – Strategies in Prose.

Instructor(s): Nicholas F Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Close analysis of five classic novels of 20th Century English and American literature: A Farewell to Arms, The Good Soldier, To the Lighthouse, As I Lay Dying, and Ulysses. Attention will be paid to the authorial techniques of presentation, and written work will consist of exercises in imitation of Hemingway, Ford, Woolf, Faulkner, and Joyce. Instead of asking what does Joyce mean, we'll talk of what means he deploys; instead of discussing Woolf as incipient suicide, we'll talk of Mrs. Ramsay's death in a parenthesis. The article of faith throughout is that imitation is not merely the sincerest form of flattery, but also a good way to read.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 – The Culture of Enlightenment. Meets with Comparative Literature 410.001.

Instructor(s): Richard Feingold (berkeley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The terrible events of September 11 and thereafter provide a pertinent and tragic context for this course. For the makers of the culture of the Enlightenment – the scientists, philosophers and imaginative writers whose remarkable work was done in the two centuries spanning the years 1600 to 1800 – either lived in or knew of a Europe that had been devastated by political conflict fueled by fierce religious passions. Taken together, the tendency of their work was to seek for a better way. Directly or by powerful implication their work amounted to a piercing criticism of the claims of religious authority and had in sight the reconstruction of human life on entirely secular grounds – on the basis, that is, of what could be known from our experience of this world, and not from what was revealed in the supernatural heavens. About the supernatural heavens and their inhabitants the skeptical thinkers of the Enlightenment didn't believe anything much could be known, but they did know that claims to such knowledge, especially when allied to political ends, could create havoc on earth. Among the results of their effort are some of the elements of modern life that we most value: religious toleration, freedom of speech, political democracy, immense advances in the scientific understanding of our natural environment, technological mastery of that environment, and greater material well-being and personal freedom than mankind had ever known before. Scientists, historians, psychologists, political theorists, philosophers all created the Enlightenment – Galileo, Gibbon, Locke, Hume – and we will read significant segments of their works. But, as is appropriate to an English course, our primary focus will be on how the literary imagination flourished in this revolutionary environment: Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson will be central to the course, with important corollary reading in the French writers, Voltaire and Diderot, and the American, Benjamin Franklin. Moreover, we will find room in this course for some work with John Milton – a writer who responded with ardent enthusiasm to the political and intellectual ferment of his time and who is of interest to us in this course precisely because his enthusiasm for the revolutionary environment of the Enlightenment seemed to him entirely compatible with religious convictions and commitments that other Enlightenment thinkers were more reserved about or hostile to. In working with Milton, we will focus mainly on Areopagitica, Milton's grand but troubled argument for freedom of the press, and I will expect students to know his Paradise Lost, either through previous course work or their willingness now to get to know it independently. All along we will be interested in those critiques of enlightenment culture – assessments of the costs associated with all its benefits – articulated by its own most interesting creators and by those who were to come later – including such major imaginative writers as Dostoyevsky, and such twentieth-century thinkers as Michel Foucault and Thedore Adorno.

In the course of the term, students will write two or three short papers of about 3 pages each, and will prepare a term paper of about 20 pages which will require some study of recent scholarship. Each student will also make at least two presentations to the class. The course will be conducted primarily through class discussion, but from time to time I will give an informal lecture.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 004 – Protest and Patience in Late Medieval England.

Instructor(s): Catherine Sanok (sanok@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Late medieval England witnessed tremendous political, economic, and religious upheaval, including the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, the heretical Lollard movement, and the troubled kingship of Richard II and his deposition by Henry IV. This class explores the literature that responded to – and sometimes participated in – these and other crises, looking both at works that protest contemporary social conditions and those that advocate patient endurance of them. At this early moment in the English tradition, how does imaginative literature intervene in the world of political event and social ideology? What is the relationship between polemical works and self-consciously literary ones? We will read texts that address changing and contested understandings of political authority, religious practice, gender ideology, and class mobility; these will include Lollard texts, several of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the Book of Margery Kempe, works from the Piers Plowman tradition, and some urban drama.

Course requirements: active participation in class discussion; reading journal; one 20-minute oral presentation; 15 pp. seminar paper.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 005 – Land, Money, & Identity in 17th & 18th Century England.

Instructor(s): Mark A Koch (markkoch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean that the protagonist of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, upon first viewing the grounds of a country manor remarks that to be mistress of that estate "might be something!" When Christopher Marlowe's Tamburlaine says, "Give me a map; then let me see how much is left for me to conquer all the world," what relationship is suggested between maps and such conquering heroes? This class will examine how the literature, cartography and other printed geographic texts of 17th and 18th century England created ideas of place and space. We will further consider the how these texts are linked to new conceptions of land; money and wealth; and national, local, and individual identity. We will read three novels by Daniel Defoe including Moll Flanders, Robinson Crusoe, and The Farther Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, as well as Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Additional readings, in a fairly full course pack, will include several recent essays on critical cartography, a few travel accounts from the period, and a number of poems. Course work includes two exams, weekly contributions to an online discussion, a brief class presentation, and a single, sustained, and substantial sixteen-page term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Nancy B Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a studio course designed to help advanced undergraduate writers further develop their art, build on their knowledge of craft, and refine their own aesthetics and understanding of literary fiction's possibilities. How do you as a writer and as a reader define "story"? What shapes of fiction do you draw on, invent, or reinvent to convey your particular vision, and what new territory might benefit your work? We'll focus primarily on short forms of literary fiction, exploring their potential and their limits, the uses of traditional and inventive structures, ways of presenting character, choices in narration and point of view, the music of the language, etc. We will read published fiction by several contemporary writers, and throughout the term workshop writers will produce and present new fiction, write brief experimental exercises, and read and respond to fiction by other workshop members.

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ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001 – Subject & Subjectivity: Creating Reality.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Upper level students who are interested in the writing of non-fiction, creative, prose should join us. We will want to uncover, in our discussions, how we go through a continuing process of creating and recreating ourselves. Primarily, we will obtain a focus in our discussions by immersing ourselves in "other" people's points of view. The literature we read will present a diverse group of writers who write about being Native American, Asian American, African American, Jewish American, or homosexual. Although the final syllabus has not been made, selections will most likely include the following writers: T. Morrison, M. Hong-Kingston, M. Cunningham, L. Erdrich, and M. Chabon.

Requirements include: a continuing writing process with a final result of approximately twenty pages of polished prose and a weekly short response to a fellow student's writing. The subject of your writing will be determined by you, but the form of the paper will be a critical analysis that reaches for the intellect of your reader as well as the emotional center.

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ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of English 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist concentrating in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy concentrator reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo – be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary.

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ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 003 – Persuasive Writing.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/ENGL425w02.html

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 428. Senior Writing Tutorial.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): G Keith Taylor (keitay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, 323, and 423/429. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a thesis tutorial for undergraduate students who are in their last year of the Creative Writing Subconcentration and have taken the 200-, 300- and 400-level writing workshops. Working closely with the writing faculty, students will complete a major manuscript. The course will culminate in a reading series in which students present their best work to the public. The first class meeting will be held on Thursday, January 10 in G239 Angell Hall; thereafter, biweekly tutorials will be scheduled according to the convenience of the instructor and students.

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ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 – Rhyme & Time: A User's Guide to Prosody. Meets with English 579.001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a chance for undergraduates, as well as graduate students both in the PhD and MFA programs to learn virtually all there is to know in one term about rhyme, meter, stanza forms, etc., in an atmosphere catering both to the practicing poet and the non-specialist. This is a "singing school." We will approach the subject the way poets, professional and amateur, have always approached prosody – by "studying / Monuments of its own magnificence," as Yeats put it, and then trying to set up our own lean-tos.

The course has two aspects: one, historical and explanatory; the other, practical. The professor will offer a historical survey of versification in English, beginning with the Old English alliterative line, glancing in a very amateur manner at the Classical meters, moving all the way to free verse and beyond, to the return to rhyme and meter among poets of the 80s, 90s & 00s. On the practical side, each student will be asked, each week, to write in the verse form that is being studied.

Paul Fussell's Poetic Meter and Poetic Form and The Shorter Norton Anthology of Poetry will be primary textbooks. There is also a course pack incorporating selections from John Frederick Nims, Robert Graves, Robert Bridges, George Saintsbury, the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, John Thompson's Founding of English Meter, Vladimir Nabokov's Notes on Prosody, Charles O. Hartmann's unsatisfactory book on free verse, Harvey Gross' Sound and Form in Modern Poetry, and obscure snippets from here and there.

Class limited to fifteen on the undergraduate level and five on the graduate level. Expect to work hard, learn a lot, and have a lot of fun.

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ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001 – Meets with English 549.001.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollacl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term, we will read a dozen American novels written within the past fifty years. Possible list of authors: (Gayl) Jones, (J.K.) Toole, DeLillo, Roth, Baker, (Marilynne) Robinson, Ford, O'Brien, Cunningham, Munro, Erdrich, (Rosellen) Brown, Tyler, and Ha-Jin. In addition to discussing the intellectual and emotional content of each book, we will take apart each novel and see how the writer has put it together. To this end, we will focus on questions of structure, voice, point of view, setting, control of information, tense, authorial intrusion, modes of discourse, authorial distance, gestures toward realism and flights into fantasy. We will pay special attention to ways in which these novels are problematic and develop possible criteria for reviewing contemporary fiction. Though this is slotted to be a large class, students will be encouraged to take active part in discussions. Each student will turn in two short papers and one longer essay.

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ENGLISH 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard L Hilles

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 444 / THTREMUS 322. History of Theatre II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leigh Woods (lawoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 444 / THTREMUS 322. History of Theatre II.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): E.J. Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 322.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 450. Medieval Drama.

Section 001 – Sex and Religion in Medieval Drama.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Medieval drama encompasses a wide range of texts, from extremely bawdy secular literature to serious devotional plays. Some texts explore the comedy of human sexual desire, others the grotesque possibilities of the sexualized body. As we read these plays, we will come better to appreciate how literature invents sexuality. Still other texts seek to teach Christian biblical history to the laity, beginning with Creation and ending with the Last Judgment. Although the Christian Bible obviously inspires such literature, the actors speak distinctly unbiblical words, at times uttering blasphemous scatological curses, at other times mocking ecclesiastical rituals. These plays will allow us to explore the connections between serious religious aspiration and carnivalesque laughter. Throughout this course, we will discover that European culture changes significantly between the twelfth century and the fifteenth, leading to fascinating changes in definitions of both sexuality and piety. Course requirements: active participation in discussions, reading response papers, peer critiques, and two short essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 461. English Romantic Literature.

Section 001 – Satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore the diversity of writing – poetry, fiction, autobiography, experimental prose – of the Romantic period (1780-1830), with particular emphasis on the later part of the period. We will read Dorothy and William Wordsworth, both Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley, Keats, Byron, Austen, Thomas De Quincey, and others. Topics will include: formulations of freedom, scandal and irony, gender and romanticism. Students will write one paper, one annotated bibliography which will allow them to do advanced research on a topic of their choosing, and one take-home final exam.

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ENGLISH 465 / MEMS 465. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Section 001 – Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is an anthology of stories varying in style and genre, told by similarly diverse fictional narrators. Including both the stateliness of the Knight's Tale and the ribaldry of the Miller's Tale, it creates a new audience in English for a literature simultaneously playful and serious. We will read most of the Tales, paying attention to the work's qualities as an innovative story collection. Central questions will include: How does the Canterbury Tales address its audience? What is the purpose of its interpretative openness? What relations develop between literary style and social position? We will focus especially on narrative voices and the effects they create in their readers; audio tapes will help us hear these voices in Middle English. One or two short papers, one longer paper, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Michele Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 – Class and Money in American Fiction.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the interrelationships of class and money in some American fiction. These will range from the rags-to-riches success formula of Horatio Alger's Ragged Dick of the 1880s to Tom Wolfe's satire of the glitzy get-rich 1980s, Bonfire of the Vanities. In between we will read Henry James' The American, Jack London's Martin Eden, Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie, Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Sinclair Lewis' Babbitt, John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, and Philip Roth's Goodbye Columbus. Grades in the course will be based on two exams and frequent short writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 002 – The Conquest of America.

Instructor(s): Michael Staub

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 479 / CAAS 489. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Simms-Burton

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 274 and AAS 201 and/or 320 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 – Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years. Meets with Russian 479.001

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 479.001.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 – Dickens and Wilde.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 004 – Toni Morrison as Novelist and Critic. Meets with CAAS 458.001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 – Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of this century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable. Coursework includes one 8 page essay and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 – Rhetoric & the Achievement of Women's Rights.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL484w02/index.html

Most nineteenth-century American women had little or no access to political leaders, higher education, or even the wages they earned; they were not allowed to vote, sign contracts, or own property in the United States. Despite these rigid constraints and tremendous opposition, over a span of eight decades American women generated massive social and political changes. How? By using the only tool available to them: language. Clearly, what we say, how we say it, and to whom it is said can – and does – change the world. In this class, you'll learn to use rhetorical theory as a way to critically examine persuasive appeals while we study texts from the nineteenth-century woman's rights movement. Together, we will consider the power of language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society. Work for the course includes class participation, quizzes, and two exams. For waitlist and attendance policies, visit the course website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 489 / EDUC 440. Teaching of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charlotte C Ratzlaff

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 – Gender and Sexuality in Shakespeare. (Honors).

Instructor(s): Valerie J Traub (traubv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive study of Shakespeare's language of erotic love, desire, and sexual violence in his sonnets, narrative poems, and plays. Focusing on the ways in which gender and sexuality were conceptualized in the late 16th century, we will engage in thematic readings of texts that are grounded in an understanding of their original historical context as well as in an appreciation of their continuing relevance. We will pursue many questions, including: How are masculinity and femininity defined? What does it mean to desire? What is the impact of patriarchal marriage on the choice of a mate? In a period prior to the division of homosexuality from heterosexuality, how is eroticism conceptualized? What kinds of sexual violence are represented? How are gender and sexuality related to such variables as social rank, race, and national identity? How are gender and sexuality tied to literary genre and dramatic/narrative structure? In addition to reading across the Shakespeare corpus, assignments will include reading critical essays and watching films. Written work will include a report on secondary criticism, analysis of a film, and a 12-15 page paper on a topic of your choice. Vigorous, consistent class participation is presumed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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