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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in French


This page was created at 5:37 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 – April 26)

Open courses in French
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for FRENCH

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for French.

What's New This Week in French.

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FRENCH 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

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FRENCH 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See French 101. French 102 is the continuation of French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

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FRENCH 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

French 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in French 101 and 102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the coordinator. Because students placed in French 103 are already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace. Students will need to plan on spending at least 8 to 10 hours each week preparing for daily lessons. Tests and quizzes (with both aural and written components) will be administered to check students' assimilation of the material covered in class. There will be two hourly exams, three 25 minutes quizzes, a final exam, compositions, and two speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of some French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, the web) will be used to aid in developing writing, reading, and listening skills as well as cultural competency. Since active participation is essential to the development of strong communicative skills, regular attendance is required and participation will be included in the final grade.

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FRENCH 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 111. French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of French 111-112 does not satisfy the LSA language requirement. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to increase the reading proficiency gained in French 111. It begins with an intensive and comprehensive review of grammar and idioms, followed by special work for sight-reading. Toward midterm, students select several articles of a book in their field of specialization for outside reading, and they complete their reading on their own with frequent consultation with the instructor. Classes meet in sections of 25 students. They meet four times per week. There are weekly quizzes, course-wide midterm and final examinations.

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FRENCH 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. French 231 builds and expands upon the work done in French 101/102 or French 103. The primary goals of French 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures the world over, and to discover both similarities and differences between the way French-speaking people live, think, and express themselves as compared to the way you live, think, and express yourselves;
  • utilize technology to help you in your study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

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FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In French 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, two compositions, two tests, and a final examination.

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FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 – Contemporary Social Issues.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics and culture through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union – The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's Multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

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FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 002, 004 – Contemporary Social Issues.

Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics and culture through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union – The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's Multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

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FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 003, 005 – Contemporary Social Issues.

Instructor(s): Roger E Butler-Borruat

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics and culture through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union – The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's Multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

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FRENCH 240. French and Francophone Topics in Translation.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 – French Colonialism and Its Aftermaths.

Instructor(s): Jarrod L Hayes

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer an introduction to Francophone literature through a variety of works from cultures colonized by France. The regions we will study include North and West Africa, the Caribbean, and Quebec. Since this literature will be studied in translation, this course would be an ideal introduction to French postcolonial studies for those who do not read French. But since the reading list is composed of works not frequently taught, French concentrators may take advantage of the one course in English allowed for the concentration to supplement their knowledge of Francophone cultures.

Each of the regions represented by Francophone literatures experienced radically different forms of colonial rule. French exploration of North America began during the 16th century, but Quebec was lost to the British in 1763, and French settlers there were in turn colonized by the British. French possessions in the Caribbean were consolidated in the early 17th century, yet Martinique and Guadeloupe remain French departments to this very day. In 1830, France invaded Algeria, which would become its most important settler colony, and the Algerians fought a bloody, eight-year revolution for their independence, which was achieved in 1962. Tunisia and Morocco became protectorates in 1881 and 1912, respectivly, and were granted independence in 1956. Though the French established a foothold on the coast of West Africa in 1659, the scramble for Africa began in earnest only at the end of the 19th century, and all countries of French West Africa had become independent by 1960.

This course first will examine the experience of colonial rule as articulated by those colonized by the French. The mere existence of such narratives is an indication of a French-style education, which elevated a minority to the status of a privileged elite but also gave this minority the tools with which to criticize colonial injustices in the colonizer's own language. We then will examine narratives that articulate the aftermath of colonization which persisted once most colonized countries achieved independence. In many cases these narratives offer a bitter critique of repressive post-independence governments that took over from the French at independence, often with France's consent. Throughout the course, special attention will be devoted to the history of slavery in the Francophone world, and the way racial differences were constructed by French colonizers (as opposed to definitions of race most Americans are familiar with). Consideration will also be devoted to the way colonialism and nationalism intersect with gender and sexuality.

Course Requirements: There will be a short midterm paper, a longer research paper on a work included in the reading list for the course, two papers, class presentations, and in-class writings.

Required Texts:

  • Driss Chraïbi, The Simple Past (Morocco)
  • Simone Schwarz-Barth, The Bridge of Beyond (Guadeloupe)
  • Gabrielle Roy, The Tin Flute (Quebec)
  • Kateb Yacine, Nedjma (Algeria)
  • Mariama Bâ, So Long a Letter (Senegal)
  • Aimé Césaire, Notebook of a Return to the Native Land (Martinique)
  • Ahmadou Kourouma, The Suns of Independence (Ivory Coast)

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FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Topic?

Instructor(s): Katherine Almquist

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 – Women and Epistolary Fictions.

Instructor(s): Kong Katherine (kkong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do we read letters? How do we write letters? As a form that has survived into the modern age from its earliest beginnings, the letter remains an essential cultural artifact as well as communicative tool. What ways of thinking and expressing are enabled or foreclosed by the epistolary form? What kinds of participation in wider culture does it permit? As participants in letter-writing culture (e-mail counts!), as well as readers of literary letters, what are the interpretive frames we bring to reading letters?

This course will address these questions, examining the origins of the epistolary form in French literature and culture, and its development through several hundred years of literature. We will consider the various functions of the epistle, as an art form, as a mode of communication, and as a cultural artifact revealing contemporary concerns and conventions, such as attitudes towards public versus private space, literacy, class status, and gender. Women in particular have been associated with the epistolary form, and we will examine some of the underpinnings of this association. We will also think about how the experiences of letter writing and reading have changed with modern technological advancements.

In this course will also write varied letters of our own, towards strengthening French writing skills, as well as gaining perspective on this topic in through practice.

The course will be taught in French.

Written work: letters, two short papers, peer editing, final 5-page paper.

Texts will include:

  • The Personal Letters of Abelard et Heloise, ed. Jacques Monfrin
  • Les lettres Portugaises, Gabriel Joseph de Lavergne Guilleragues
  • Lettres de Mistress Henley publiées par son amie, Isabelle de Charrière
  • Lettres d'une Péruvienne, Françoise de Graffigny
  • Une si longue lettre, Mariama Bâ

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    FRENCH 272. French and Francophone Film, Media, and Culture.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Section 001 – Cinema and Society in the French Speaking World.

    Instructor(s): Frieda Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this course we will examine the constitution of cinematic practice as a discourse, and the role it plays in both resisting and contributing to the reproduction of social relations – particularly relations of race, ethnicity, class, power and gender. Through the general historical shift presupposed by this course would encourage one to focus on the reproductive aspects of the cinema, we will be giving priority to examples that foreground the articulation of oppositional positions. Our aim will not be simply to catalogue different articulations, but to clarify what constitutes an oppositional cinematic discourse by comprehending what organizes the diversity of positions we examine as well as illuminate the interrelationship of various forms of political discrimination, as explored in what has come to be know as "third cinema."

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    FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Section 001 – Writing Women: Gender and Artistic Production in 20th-Century France.

    Instructor(s): Rebecca L Graves (rlgraves@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    What does it mean to write as a woman? Do women write differently? What cultural stereotypes come into play when one considers the gender of a writer? How do economic, social, and cultural conditions influence literary production by women? How do academic institutions and publishing houses shape women writers and how they are perceived by society as a whole? These are some of the questions that will guide our investigation of the relationship between gender and artistic production in 20th-century France.

    As addressing these questions requires an understanding of the origins of cultural stereotypes of femininity in France, we will begin by discussing the Rousseauian association of woman with nature, nineteenth-century stereotypes of femininity, and the feminist movement in France. Other sections of the course will consider: Colette's exploration of feminine sexuality; Simone de Beauvoir's constructivist dictum: "On n'est pas née une femme, on le devient". Sarraute and Duras' representation of women and their relationship to the literary movement of the New Novel; the philosophical, aesthetic and political underpinnings of "écriture féminine"; Chantal Akerman's revolutionary film about a home-maker/prostitute; Annie Ernaux's minimalist dissection of the interface between gender and social class; and Marie Darieussecq's modern fable about a woman who turns into a sow.

    In class discussion and in a series of one-page weekly reaction papers students will have the chance to improve their spoken and written French. A 3-4 page paper will be due at the mid-point of the academic term, and the final exercise will be a take-home exam consisting of a series of essay questions on the material covered.

    A list of possible authors includes: Rousseau, D'Héricourt, Adams, Proudhon, Michelet, Marinetti, Breton, Colette, Beauvoir, Sarraute, Duras, Cixous, Varda, Akerman, Ernaux, Breillat, Djebar, and Darrieusecq.

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    FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Section 002 – Powers of Love: Marriage and Adultery in French Culture.

    Instructor(s): Dominica Chang

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course offers an introduction to pre-modern French culture, and investigates representations of marriage and adultery in France prior to the Revolution while helping students develop speaking and writing skills in French. As they are today, marriage and adultery in pre-modern France were linked to notions of romantic love but were primarily social constructs defined by legal, religious, and ethical codes. As an institution, marriage could be a powerful political and economic tool to build dynasties and fortunes; although adultery could be viewed as a surrender to illicit sexual desire, it likewise offered a way for men and women to exercise social and political influence. Both also provided contexts through which to dispute and determine other categories such as notions of the "normative" and the "aberrant;" gender and sexual roles; hierarchies among the classes; and secular and religious lifestyles.

    This course will explore how the concepts of marriage and adultery have both shaped the values of historical French cultures and been shaped by them. We will grapple with the intersections of gender, sexuality, and politics using a range of materials, including literature, art, political and medical tracts, and film. Although the course will focus on French society before the nineteenth century, we also will use modern sources such as newspaper clippings, magazine articles, and advertisements to think about parallels and differences between pre-modern cultures and our own.

    Readings will include works by Marie de France, Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, Ronsard, Labé, Molière, Laclos (selections), and selected photocopies of political and medical texts. Films will include Le Retour de Martin Guerre and La Reine Margot.

    Assignments will consist of one oral presentation, weekly one-page response papers, three four-page essays, and a final exam.

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    FRENCH 333. French Phonetics.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    FRENCH 335. Composition and Stylistics.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course focuses on written production and textual interpretation. It will enhance one's writing and interpretative skills in French.

    Students will acquire linguistic, rhetorical, stylistic, narrative and prosodic tools indispensable in writing production and textual analysis. Course content will include use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, use of punctuation, essential rules of essay composition, analysis of prose and poetic literary texts and press articles.

    The final grade will be based on several written exercise (30%), two quizzes (20%), three 3-4 page essays (30%), and very active class participation (20%).

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    FRENCH 364. African Studies (Maghreb).

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Section 001 – The Maghreb: Subjectivity and National Identity.

    Instructor(s): Jarrod L Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will examine a number of novels from the Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) written in French. We shall begin with the childhood narratives that mark the birth of a Francophone Maghrebian literature distinct from the literature of Metropolitan France. In the aftermath of World War II, this new literature coincided with the consolidation of national identity producing the nationalists movements that would end French colonial rule in the Maghreb. We shall consider examples of "combat literature," which articulated this resistance to colonialism in the form of the novel. And finally, we shall consider how Maghrebian literature reflects on the post-independence conditions of the Maghreb, what some have called the postcolonial condition.

    Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed on the relation between the individual and his/her collectivity or nation. What role does the articulation of a subjectivity through narrative (always also a gendered subjectivity and a sexual subjectivity) play in the articulation of national identity? How can marginal subjectivities challenge models of national identity? What is the relation between postcolonial and postmodern subjectivities?

    We shall consider literary texts from the interdisciplinary approach of Cultural Studies and in relation to Maghrebian cultural production in the other arts, especially film. When appropriate, the novels will be read in conjunction with essays on the history, politics, and social sciences of the Maghreb. Students will also read several essays by Maghrebian feminists and certain key essays in postcolonial theory.

    Course Requirements: There will be two papers, class presentations, a journal of reflections on the readings, and in-class writing.

    Required Texts:

    • Albert Memmi, La statue de sel
    • Rachid Boudjedra, La répudiation
    • Assia Djebar, Ombre sultane
    • Tahar Ben Jelloun, L'enfant de sable

    Films:

    • Halfaouine
    • The Battle of Algiers

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    FRENCH 368. Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Section 001 – Voyages in Space, Society, and Time.

    Instructor(s): William R Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    FRENCH 385. Contemporary France: Politics, Culture, and Society.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Section 001 – A survey of French culture from the Revolution of 1789 to the present.

    Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The course will focus on the social changes that occurred in the wake of a series of revolutions (1789, 1830, 1848, 1871), and the development of the modern political State. Slides, movies, and texts will help us understand the aesthetic movements, official and marginal, that shaped the period: Romanticism, Symbolism, Decadence, Surrealism, contemporary thought. Special attention will be given to developments in the arts and architecture, from David to the Centre Pompidou and the Orsay Museum. Conducted in French.

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    FRENCH 391. Junior Honors Course.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Reading of selected works from French literature. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

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    FRENCH 392. Junior Honors Course.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Reading of selected works from French literature. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

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    FRENCH 399. Independent Study.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

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    FRENCH 402 / CAAS 433. Francophone Literature in Translation.

    Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

    Section 001 – African Drama.

    Instructor(s): Mbala Nkanga

    Prerequisites & Distribution: A literature course or any course dealing with the Black experience in Africa or the Americas. Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (Excl). Only one literature in translation course may be considered for the concentration requirements.

    Foreign Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Since the advent of the "Concours Théâtral Interafricain" in 1968, Francophone drama in Africa has evolved into one of the most important literary and artistic forms emanating from Africa. Playwrights such as Guy Menga, Guillaume Oyono-Mbia, Bernard Dadié, Abdou Anta Kâ, Seydou Badian Kouyate, Tchikaya U'Tamsi, Sony Labou Tansi, and Diur N'tumb, have demonstrated their mastery of the use of the French language while depicting African ways of life. In many instances the writers translated the poetics of African orature into French. In others they blended elements of history and fiction in order to analyze social, political crises in today's Africa for the delight of the readers and the anger of political brokers. Some of the writers such as Sony Labou Tansi have endeavored to craft new words and concepts, as well as invented powerful images, to express their Africanity within the Francophone universe, and their frustrations in front of social and political decay in many African nations. Through reading of plays and critical materials, viewing contextual videos, discussions, the course will consider the African individual and his/her society as depicted in some of the dramatic writings. In so doing, it intends to explore the writing patterns of some of the most read and performed Francophone African playwrights. It will include the issues of translation, which becomes an extension of Senghor's "metissage culturel" as it involves at different stages both writing and translating into two non-native languages. The focus of the course will be on SONY LABOU TANSI, GUILLAUME OYONO-MBIA, BERNARD DADIE, and DIUR N'TUMB.

    Although the course deals with literature in translation, at least reading proficiency in French is required for some critical consideration of few of the original texts.

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    FRENCH 414. Advanced Business French.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: French 380. A maximum of six credits of French 380, 414, and Business Administration 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    FRENCH 450. Special Studies.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Section 001 – Filming a Nation: French Cinema and the Iconography of Nationhood.

    Instructor(s): Rebecca L Graves (rlgraves@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    FRENCH 491. Senior Honors Course.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    FRENCH 492. Senior Honors Course.

    Cultural and Literary Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    Graduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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