Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History


This page was created at 5:39 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 April 26)

Open courses in History
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTORY

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for History.

What's New This Week in History.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

HISTORY 111. Modern Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 110 is recommended as prerequisite. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 122 / ASIAN 122. Modern East Asia.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidney DeVere Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to modern China, Korea, and Japan from 1800 to the present. It covers the following topics: (1) China's progressive decline and rejuvenation, the impact of imperialism, the rise and development of the People's Republic; (2) the struggles of Korea, its colonization by Japan, liberation, division into two Koreas, and the rising economic status of the South; and (3) the end of feudalism in Japan, the building of a modern state and economy, Japanese imperialism, postwar recovery, and rise to super-power status. Taking a broad comparative perspective on East Asia, the course explores the interrelations between political economy, society, and culture in each country within an emerging modern world system. This is a continuation of Asian Studies 121; however, that course is not a prerequisite and no previous background on the subject is required. Two lectures and one discussion section each week. Two exams and a final.

Required Reading:

  • Brace Jovanovich, c1982. ISBN: 0155598708 (pbk.) ($47.50)
  • Kim, Richard E. Lost Names: Scenes from a Korean Boyhood, Berkeley, University of California Press, [1998], c1988. ISBN: 0520214242 (pbk.) ($12.55)
  • Seybolt, Peter J. Throwing the Emperor from His Horse: Portrait of a Village Leader in China, 1923-1995. (Westview Press, 1996) ISBN: 0813331315 (pbk.) ($23.00)

Purchase these in Textbooks Section of Shaman Drum, 311-315 South State Street, Tel: (734) 662-7407. You can order textbooks online at: www.shamandrum.com and pick them up on the first floor thus avoiding the long lines.

The course packs required for this course are:

  • Modern East Asia: History 122 (course pack #1): at Accu-copy, 518 E. William Street, Tel: (734) 769-8338 ($33.25)
  • Modern East Asia: History 122 (course pack #2): also at Accu-copy, 518 E. William Street, Tel: (734) 769-8338.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 160. United States to 1865.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip J Deloria

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will trace the formation and development of the United States from precontact American Indian societies through the Civil War. We will pay particular attention to intercultural contact, ecology and economy, cultural production and consumption, the importance of war, and the role of ideas, among other key themes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Smith (davidsm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the main narrative of events that have shaped the American nation since 1865 by studying the extent to which the nation's rhetoric about "democracy," "liberty," "rights," "independence," and "freedom" has been a reality in the United States. In particular, it will explore how the nation has been transformed by the rise of industry, immigration, urbanization, social protest, racial conflict, war, and other major events. While in many regards concepts like "democracy," "liberty," "rights," "independence," and "freedom" have been embraced and championed by the American nation, not all groups within the United States have equally shared in the rewards of these ideas. Over time, numerous attempts have been made to challenge the established power structures that have prevented various groups from having full access to the rights afforded all citizens by the evolving meaning of the U.S. Constitution. Through a range of readings, this course will examine this central idea about the shaping of modern America: since the end of the Civil War to what extent have the institutions legal, social, economic, and political of the United States protected "life, liberty, and property" equally for the citizens of the U.S.? Embedded within this discussion of the internal divisions and conflicts that have shaped the American nation, this course also will explore the ways in which these factors have given shape to the rising power of the United States on an international level. That is, what dominant issues and groups have played the critical role in shaping the policies that led the United States increasingly into a position of world power? As an introductory survey course, the class will examine the many key events that are critical to broadening our collective understanding of modern America and its position in the world today.
Required readings for the course may be purchased at Shaman Drum Bookshop, 313 South State:

  • John M. Murrin, et al, Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People, vol. 2, since 1865 (text)
  • Eric Foner, The Story of American Freedom
  • Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
  • Dalton Trumbo, Johnny Got His Gun
  • Howard Kester, Revolt Among the Sharecroppers
  • John Hersey, Hiroshima
  • Lynda Van Devanter, Home Before Morning: The Story of an Army Nurse in Vietnam
  • Ruth Sidel, Keeping Women and Children Last: America's War on the Poor

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 Epidemics: Deadly Disease in American History

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 AsianAmer& Civil Rights Movement. Meets with American Culture 102.001.

Instructor(s): Scott Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 102.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 Medieval Geographies.

Instructor(s): Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did the inhabitants of Europe envision their world in the millennium between the fall of Rome in the fifth century and the discovery of new continents in the fifteenth? In this course we will consider the order of the medieval Christian cosmos which placed the Earth rather than the Sun at the center of the universe; we will study ways in which the geography of that Earth was mapped and the ways in which boundaries were established and territorial space given meaning; and we will consider also the ways in which people perceived those who lived beyond their own territorial boundaries, how, for example, the English viewed the Welsh or Europeans, the Mongols. Finally, we will give some consideration to the ways the understanding and representation of the world changed in the fifteenth century. Texts for the course will be largely original sources from the period, including descriptive histories and travel accounts as well as maps of the Earth and plans of the universe.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 004 Criminal Responsibility in Anglo-American History. (Honors)

Instructor(s): Thomas A Green

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar deals with several fundamental issues in western civilization as they have manifested themselves in the Anglo-American past: the requisites for criminal guilt; the means of determining whether one possesses those requisites (typically, the criminal trial); and the most common justifications for imposition of punishment (retribution, deterrence, and reform). We shall study these matters in relation to two central ideas of freedom: political liberty and human free will. Special attention will be given to: the history of the jury as a "buffer" between the state and the individual or the community; the manner in which challenges to the presumption that humans possess the ability freely to control their behavior have shaped the institutions and ideas of Anglo-American criminal justice. Students will analyze and discuss primary sources and recent historical writings and will write several short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 Travels in History.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the changing experiences and representations of travelling in European history. Travels and travel accounts generate information and it is this creation of knowledge through travelling which interests us primarily. For Herodotus, one of the "fathers of history," forays into the unknown served to collect data on foreign regions, their inhabitants, and their history. In medieval and early modern Europe, routes to the east, west, and south conjured up a wealth of images, mapped by religious beliefs, textual traditions, and vague notions of the distant foreign. Our main focus will be the period of 1200 to 1600, an age of increasing mobility as well as an age of European discoveries and nascent empire-building overseas. We will reflect on travelling through the lens of famous travellers like Marco Polo or Christopher Columbus.

We will study different types of travels, expeditions and imaginary travels, pilgrimages and tourist trips. At the same time, we will work towards an awareness of what it means to travel in today's world of global interconnectedness.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Vienna, Berlin, and Paris: 1890-1930.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When, where, and how does our age begin? Before Vienna the unconscious was an object of wonder; before Berlin the cinema was a charming toy; before Paris music and art made sense. Within the orbits of these great cities, before, during, and after World War I, our world was created at the hands of extraordinary men and women. This seminar explores the literature, art, music, cinema, the culture of an age in a flurry of creation and destruction, using the similarities and differences of the cities as center. Students will work on projects of their own choosing: some examples from the past have included the self-portraits of Picasso, the war in the air, Hollywood as an outpost of Europe, women's work in wartime, sports photography as a social indicator, there are many possibilities.

Required Readings:

  • Bertold Brecht, Three Penny Opera
  • Albert Einstein, Autiobiography
  • Siegmund Freud, Dora
  • Otto Griedrich, Before the Deluge
  • Frank Whitford, Klimt.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 201. Rome.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 The Roman Empire and its Legacy.

Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 211 / MEMS 211. Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500.

Europe History from European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will investigate the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the opening of the second millennium through the fourteenth century. Some important themes will be the nature of kingship and representative institutions; patterns of urban, economic, and demographic growth; and movements in religious and intellectual life. Extensive readings from contemporary documents (chronicles, romances, poetry, sermons, etc.), a midterm, a final examination, and two short papers are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 218. The Vietnam War, 1945-1975.

Other History Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 221. Survey of British History from 1688.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 229 / ANTHRCUL 226. Introduction to Historical Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthropology 101. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 226.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 229 / ANTHRCUL 226. Introduction to Historical Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David William Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthropology 101. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 226.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 229 / ANTHRCUL 226. Introduction to Historical Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthropology 101. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 226.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 247(448) / CAAS 247. Modern Africa.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 200 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 255. Gandhi's India.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rachel Lara Sturman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 151 recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 287 / ARMENIAN 287. Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

Section 001 Going to the Fair.

Instructor(s): A Michael Wintroub (wintroub@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

Section 002 Science,Tech&Defining theHuman

Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

Section 003.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 319. Europe Since 1945.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 322 / GERMAN 322. The Origins of Nazism.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu), Kerstin Barndt

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 329(517). History of Ireland Since 1603.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin Zvi Novick

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 331(439). Eastern Europe Since 1900.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian A Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the twentieth century, Eastern Europe was at the center of two World Wars and three major revolutions. The people of this region experienced the birth of independent national states after World War I and the overthrow of communism in 1989, but in between they suffered through decades of oppresion by regimes of both the right and the left, and witnessed the monumental nightmare of World War II and the Holocaust.

This course will explore the glories and the tragedies the 20th century brought to Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. Multimedia presentations will help bring alive the crushing poverty of peasant life, the richness of Eastern Europe's multiethnic tapestry, the unspeakable horrors of war, the gray (but not necessarily black-and-white) realities of communism, and the hopes and disappointments at the start of a new century. Grading for the class will be based on two short in-class exams, two take-home essays, and participation in discussion section.

Students may sign up for this course for 3 credits (as History 439) or 4 credits (as REES 396). The latter option will include a weekly discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 333 / REES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / POLSCI 396 / SOC 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 The Political Economy of Transformation in East Central Europe. Meets with REES 397.001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 397.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 345 / RCSSCI 357. History and Theory of Punishment.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles C Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 357.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 348(477). Latin America: The National Period.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 348(477). Latin America: The National Period.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 351. Modern China.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry Dwight Bodenhorn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Over the past two hundred years, China has experienced tremendous change, characterized by rebellions, revolutions, and now an extremely rapid drive toward modernization. This course will explore China's turbulent transition from a dynastic monarchy to a modern state. Specific topics to be covered include the Opium War, the Taiping Rebellion, the Nationalist and Communist revolutions of the 20th century, the Cultural Revolution, gender relations, environmental degradation, and recent cultural transformation. Class sessions will combine lectures, videos, and discussions. Course requirements will include two take-home tests and an in-class final. Books will be available at Shaman Drum. Course packs will be available at Ulrich's.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTORY 359. Visions of the Past.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan L Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 367 / AMCULT 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Liza Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 367.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 371 / WOMENSTD 371. Women in American History Since 1870.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Mead

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 375 / WOMENSTD 375. A History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An exploration in both history and women's studies, this course focuses on early modern European and Euro-American witchcraft beliefs, representations, accusations, and trials. It addresses three central, interrelated questions: (1) what caused the Salem witchcraft outbreak of 1692? (2) why were most witches in Christian witchcraft traditions presumed to be female? and (3) how can we account for the transformations in witch imagery from the seventeenth century to the present. There are no definitive answers to any of these questions, only a variety of attempts by scholars and other writers to answer them. We will read and analyze some of the most influential of these attempts, evaluating their merits in light of both other interpretations and the original witchcraft documents. Students will develop and write about their own conclusions in several short papers and one long one, basing their arguments on evidence provided in the readings and course lectures. Please be advised that while the history of witchcraft is a fascinating subject, it is also a complex and therefore intellectually demanding one; though no prerequisites are required, regular attendance and intellectual engagement with the readings and discussions are necessary to do well in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 378 / AMCULT 314. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 314.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 382 / MEMS 382. History of the Jews from the Spanish Expulsion to the Eve of Enlightenment.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie B Siegmund

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 384. Modern Jewish History 1880-1948.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 391. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Scientific Revolution.

Instructor(s): A Michael Wintroub (wintroub@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Environmental History of China.

Instructor(s): Terry D Bodenhorn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the long relationship between humans and nature in China, with special attention given to the impact of industrialization and population growth on the environment during the twentieth century. We will consider four basic topics over the course of the term:

  • how the peoples of China have thought about their relationship with nature;
  • the history of human impact, especially modern economic development, on the ecosystems of China and Taiwan;
  • connections between environmental change and public health;
  • social and political responses to environmental change in China and Taiwan in recent decades.

The success of the class depends on active and informed participation. Grades will be determined by participation in and leadership of discussions; two short summary-response papers (2-3 pages each); and a reseach project which will include a draft, formal peer critique(s), final paper (12-14 pages), and in-class presentation.

Books will be available at Shaman Drum. Course packs will be available at Ulrich's.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Colonial Culture/Postcol. History. Meets with Anthropology 356.001

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 356.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 History of the Civil Rights Era, 1940-Present.

Instructor(s): Kevin K Gaines

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 Science and Government in the U.S., 1776-2010.

Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nsteneck/Courses/393/index.html

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 395. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman. A maximum of six credits can be elected through History 394 and 395.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 World of the Ship.

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An exploration of the social, cultural, economic and legal dimensions of seventeenth and eighteenth century Anglo-American maritime life that scrutinizes the work of common laborers and situates their work in the expanding Atlantic economy. Topics include: captains, sailors, female and Black mariners, pirates, Captain Kidd, privateers, shipbuilding, medicine, scurvy, map-making, longitude, Captain Cook, commodity trading, naval warfare, mutiny, Captain Bligh, shipwrecks, and developments in admiralty law.

There will be six short papers and one medium-length paper required, along with weekly readings.

Books will be available for purchase at Shamam Drum Bookstore. All books and articles are also on reserve at the Shapiro Undergraduate Library.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 P.T. Barnum's America: Mass Culture. Meets with American Culture 496.003.

Instructor(s): James W Cook

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In recent years, scholars have come to view P.T. Barnum as one of the key figures in the development of U.S. mass culture. With his early hoaxes, he taught Americans that media-driven controversy sells and mapped out new boundaries of truth and fraud in the burgeoning capitalist economy. With Tom Thumb and Jenny Lind, he pioneered celebrity marketing and created the first international "stars" in the history of trans-Atlantic commerical culture. Barnum was the first showman to develop the "family audience" as the common denominator of mass cultural taste: a remarkably nebulous demographic category that has nevertheless impacted our range of cultural choices every since. Barnum also construced the boundaries of difference upon which such domestic "normalcy" depends, presenting a vast array of "freakish" others for public display: bearded ladies, Siamese twins, African wild men, etc. Barnum in short, was the architect of our modern culture industries: first, throughout the Northest, and then through his traveling circuses, which provided standardized, nationally-distributed entertainment products via the railroad.

This course will explore the full scope and complexity of Barnum's career, both in primary documents and in recent cultural history scholarship. We also will examine each of the other mass cultural developments that emerged side-by-side with Barnum during the 19th and early 20th centuries: blackface minstrelsy, burlesque, wild west shows, and motion pictures. The course is designed primarily as a discussion oriented seminar, but will also feature occasional lectures, films, and Internet components. Assignments include a take-home midterm and final, as well as frequent quizzes and short response papers. Participation and regular discussion are mandatory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 003 The World of Homer.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Chaucer Schmalz

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 004 Urban Political Machine in America.

Instructor(s): Terrence J McDonald

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 005 Critical Race Theory. Meets with CAAS 495.001

Instructor(s): Martha Jones

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 495.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 001 AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 20TH CENTURY. Meets with American Culture 496.001

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 002 Confucianism & Chinese History.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 003 Sister Sun & Brother Moon: Myth & History.

Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura (tomitono@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Come meet Japan's myriad deities and join in their tricks, treats, treacheries and triumphs. The KOJIKI (the RECORD OF ANCIENT MATTERS) is Japan's founding myth that explains "The Beginning." It explains, for instance, how a divine brother/sister pair joined body parts to produce gods, matters, and islands; how the storm god upset his sister the Sun God by polluting her sacred rice field; how divine dance brought back light; and how the Sun God dispatched a divine offspring to rule Japan. This fascinating text, written in the eighth century, became the documentary basis of the belief system later called "Shinto," and left an indelible mark on Japanese society, culture, and religion. We will read the KOJIKI and explore diverse issues from various angles and perspectives. Topics include: gender, body, biological functions and sexual acts of female and male gods; cosmological layout; the position and meaning of the Sun deity; Korean and Chinese influences; use and abuse of the KOJIKI in mondern Japan; and the place of this creation story in the world of comparative myths.

Requirements: two short papers (3 pages); one long paper (10 pages)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 004 Women&Gender in Jewish Hist.

Instructor(s): Stefanie B Siegmund

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 005 1970s Issues of Ford Admininistration.

Instructor(s): Dennis Daellenbach

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on the dynamics of the American Presidency in the 1970s, and decisions and decision-making in the Gerald R. Ford Administration. Students will examine the people and the social, economic, and political issues that shaped the Ford Presidency. The Seventies was a pivotal decade in American history. Many Ford names are recognizable Cheney, Rumsfeld, O'Neill, Greenspan, and others. And the issues also still echo today energy crisis, tax cuts, the legacy and lessons of the Vietnam War, partisan politics, razor close elections, Executive Branch relations with Congress, bringing a nation together, and more. The seminar will meet as a class for lecture/discussion during the first weeks of the academic term at the Gerald R. Ford Library on North Campus. Students will then meet individually with the instructor and staff of the Ford Library as they research and write a paper on a topic of their choice utilizing the original document resources of the Ford Library. Evaluation will be based on discussion, oral presentations to the class, written reports on readings, and the major research paper. Objectives of the course are to explore and gain an understanding of the Office of the President and Presidential decision making, to investigate how the White House functions and how it creates the documentary record, and to provide a valuable learning experience of conducting original research and writing a lengthy seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

Section 001 Junior Honors Colloquium on Methods of Historical Research.

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students; junior standing. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to prepare students to write an Honors thesis. As the first course in a three-term sequence for History Honors concentrators, it will focus on the craft of historical research and writing, and will combine analysis of theoretical works on, and possible models for, the doing of history with practical nuts-and-bolts investigations of the tools necessary to define and produce a thesis. We will be especially attentive to thinking about how historians work: the ways in which topics are defined, primary sources identified and analyzed, and arguments fashioned. Because writing is critical to the process of making knowledge in history, the seminar will be writing-intensive (approximately 40 pages), and will include a variety of kinds of historical essays. By the conclusion of the course the participants will have chosen their research topics and thesis advisors and will have written a prospectus outlining their plan of research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students; junior standing. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 401. Problems in Greek History II.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 GreekReligion:Cult&Competition.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Chaucer Schmalz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 419. Twentieth-Century Germany.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ulrike Weckel

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Hist. 420. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 420. Modern Germany.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ulrike Weckel

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit for those who have completed or are enrolled in Hist. 418 or 419. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 434. Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 443 / AAPTIS 487. Modern Middle East History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/syl443.htm

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 449. Topics in Middle Eastern History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Muslims Under and After Socialism: Former Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe. Meets with AAPTIS 491.001, AAPTIS 451.001, Asian Studies 380.001, and Anthropology 458.003.

Instructor(s): Morgan Liu

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 450. Japan to 1700.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidney DeVere Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 459. Gender, Medicine, and Culture in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 460. American Colonial History to 1776.

U.S. History

Section 001 Peoples of Early America.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Colonial America" focuses on the people of the time, often encountered speaking in their own voices, and on their broad cultural characteristics and problems as settlers first encountered the New World and its inhabitants and matured into colonial societies. Through weekly discussion of primary documents and historical studies, we will explore some of the key themes of early American history from the vantage point of the historical actors themselves: the clash between Puritanism and capitalism; the confrontation between Native American and European cultures; the emergence of a native gentry in the colonial South; and the enslavement of Africans and their transportation to the New World. History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. Students will be expected to read closely each week (average 150 pages/week), take a midterm exam, and write several short essays and a long research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 461. The American Revolution.

U.S. History

Section 001 Meets with History 461.005. (undergraduates only).

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive course on the background to the Revolution, its progress, and the changes it wrought in American life. Emphasis on America's mid-18th-century socioeconomic transformation, Britain's reorganization of her empire in the 1760s and 1770s, colonial opposition, and the emergence of a uniquely American ideology. Subsequent topics include the progress and disclocations of the military conflict, the attempt at confederation, and the culmination of the Revolutionary movement in the iteration and early development of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 465. Emergence of the Modern United States, 1876-1901.

U.S. History

Section 001 Modern US 1865-1901. Meets with American Culture 345.001.

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Greed, violence, excesses of wealth, extreme poverty, xenophobia, media spectacles, unstable gender roles, manhood under attack, uppity women, white supremacy on the rise, crimes of hatred and fear. Does this invoke the 1990s in your mind? Think again. These are all words that describe the end of the 19th century the Gilded Age. This course explores the period between the end of the Civil War and the dawn of the twentieth century by focusing on industrialization, territorial expansion, the rise of cities, new forms of sexual and racial classification and control, political transformations, work culture, and the emergence of mass consumer culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 467. The United States Since 1933.

U.S. History

Section 001 Meets with History 467.011. (Undergraduates only).

Instructor(s): Thomas Guglielmo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore World War II changes,crises, and conflicts as they profoundly shaped postwar America during the Cold War 1950s, Civil War 1960s, and complex final decades of the twentieth century. We will focus on struggles over power and resources both abroad in places like Vietnam and at home along race, gender, and class lines. This course will be a mixture of lectures, discussions, film, music, and in-class group projects.

Tentative Required Books:

May, Elaine Tyler. Homeward Bound: American Families during the Cold War Era (Basic Books, 1988.

McGirr, Lisa. Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right (Princeton, 2001).

Patterson, Thomas G. On Every Front: The Making and Unmaking of the Cold War (Norton, 1992).

Payne, Charles M. I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle (California, 1995).

Sugrue, Thomas J. Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit (Princeton, 1996).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 U.S. Women,Work&Economics.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Mead

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 19Th CENTURY AFRICAN- AMERICAN HISTORY. Meets with CAAS 458.002.

Instructor(s): Martha Jones

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 469. Precolonial Southeast Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 475(580). The History of American Constitutional Law.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Race and Citizenship in Comparative Perspective: The United States and Cuba, 1865-1965.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the relationship of law and society during a process of radical political and social transformation: the end of slavery and the redefining of the boundaries of race and citizenship. In the United States, male former slaves became full political participants for the brief period of Reconstruction, but massive retrenchment followed and by the early 20th Century, African Americans had been virtually eliminated from Southern electoral politics. In Cuba, by contrast, shortly after slavery was abolished a large-scale cross-racial nationalist movement emerged whose legacy was a strong claim to citizenship by Afro-Cuban veterans, a claim that led to the incorporation of a guarantee of universal manhood suffrage in the Cuban Constitution of 1901. Thus at the same moment that Black disfranchisement in much of the South was allowed to stand by the U.S. Supreme Court, cross-racial enfranchisement was written into the Cuban Constitution. The subsequent histories of voting and political participation in both societies were framed within this contrast, through the period of the Cuban revolution of 1959 and the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965. In exploring these contrasting histories, we will read key legal cases, historical testimony, and secondary account, paying attention to the interplay of law, electoral politics, and other forms of collective action.

The seminar will meet once a week for two hours, and will be open to law students, advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Law students will receive two credits for this seminar, but may enroll for an additional one credit of research with Prof. Scott, and undertake an additional writing assignment. LSA undergraduates will participate in an extra one-hour discussion section and will receive three credits.

Admission is by permission of the instructor, via email to rjscott@umich.edu, along with the regular admission procedures for Law School seminars.

Professor Scott is a faculty member in the Department of History and a specialist on post-emancipation societies in Latin America and the United States, currently the Sunderland Fellow at the Law School.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 The Caucasus Since the Fall of the Soviet Union.

Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the role of ethnicity in the rise of conflicts in the Caucasus during the last century. It will examine militarized conflicts (such as in Nagorno Karabagh, Abkhazia, and Chechnya) as well as latent ones (such as Javakheti, Ajaria, and Daghestan). The evolution of ethnicity and nationalism will be studied in conjunction with the role of religion, class, Russian and Soviet nationalities policies, and more recently, of state-building in independent Armenia, Azerbaijjan, and Georgia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 002 Histories of Art and Histories of Nations. Meets with History of Art 489.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas C Willette

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 489.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 003 Modern Germany. Meets with History 420.001

Instructor(s): Ulrike Weckel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 420.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 486. Social History of Early Modern England.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael P Macdonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 220 and junior standing are recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 001 Cities and History. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 511.001.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Modern metropolises have been the scenes of nation-state, news-making history. Yet, little is known about the ways the metropolises make history: by their structure and functioning; by their barricades and by the ways in which they are livable; by the broadness, smoothness or roughness of their streets; and even by how much light their windows let in, by their squares, public and apartment buildings, monuments, sewage systems, and theaters.

Metropolises are agents of history. The course will examine this thesis. Each of the five segments of the course will focus on a different metropolis and national history, and will entail the reading and discussion of one scholarly and one literary text. We will draw on a number of disciplines, including history, architecture and urban planning, anthropology, and literary criticism, but our emphasis will be on intense and sensitive reading, within and beyond the disciplines. The five modern cities we will study (subject to change depending on the inclination of the students) are: Paris (focus will be on the 1860s and 1870s, but reading and discussion will go beyond), Prague (of around the 1910s and beyond), Berlin (the 1920s and 1930s and more), New York (the 1950s in particular), and Jakarta (especially the 1960s through 1990s). The course will be open to the higher-level undergraduates and graduates in history, architecture and urban planning, anthropology, and literary criticism. People beyond any of these disciplines are very welcome as well. The requirement for the completion of the course is active and intense reading, presence at discussions, and a final paper of original research into "city and history" of about 25 pages.

The course is designed for 6 to 12 students. There will be frequent individual meetings with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 002 Nonviolent Political Movements.

Instructor(s): Stewart N Gordon (sngordon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We open with a brief survey of the historical roots of non-violence Quakers and Shakers, Transcendentalists and Suffragettes, Buddhists and Jains, and Gandhi. Wider themes include moral community, public space, non-violence and coercion, and definitions of success and failure. Most of the course involves students (in groups) closely analyzing non-violent movements, such as those against Hitler, plus Solidarity, the Civil Rights movement, anti-nuclear, anti-war, and environmental movements in various countries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 003 Imperialism&PacificIslands19C. Meets with American Culture 496.005.

Instructor(s): Damon Salesa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 496.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 004 Steam Engines and Computers: From Industrial Proletarians to Information Workers. Meets with Sociology 495.001 and RC Social Science 360.003.

Instructor(s): Thomas W O'Donnell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 360.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 550. Imperial China: Ideas, Men, and Society.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 592. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 World of Early Mod Japan. Meets with Asian Studies 491.001.

Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura (tomitono@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Graduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


Page


This page was created at 5:39 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.


LSA logo

 

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.