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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 5:45 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 April 26)

Open courses in Political Science
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Wolverine Access Subject listing for POLSCI

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Political Science.

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POLSCI 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth R Wingrove

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to some classic accounts of politics in the Western tradition, and to some critiques thereof. Readings include: Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Arendt, and King. Among the themes to be addressed: What, if anything, makes state authority legitimate? Do people benefit from political participation, or is it inevitably corrupting, confusing, irritating, and/or tiresome? What constitutes a public rather than a private concern?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel P Carpenter (dancarp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dancarp/ps111.htm

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and Nigeria. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course analyzes world politics from a broad and general perspective, explaining and exploring the principles involved in the functioning of the global political system and illustrating these principles with contemporary material. The course begins by presenting basic concepts like national power and reviewing well-known theories such as realism and liberalism. A strategic approach based on the combination of power, preferences, and perceptions will be explained. That approach is used to understand a variety of issues in world politics, including war, alliances, domestic politics and foreign policy, and international political economy. These issues will be presented both in general terms and applied to understand specific key events. The course requires two short papers, a midterm, and a final.

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POLSCI 300. Contemporary Political Issues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/syllabus.html

Political Science 300 examines a number of issues that are the focus of contemporary political debate in the United States, such as taxes and spending, poverty and welfare reform, the politics of race, healthcare policy, public education, and public safety. We will emphasize the place of the active and informed public that is, us in influencing policies that affect us all. Politics is not just something we watch on TV or read about. It's something we do.

Curiosity, skepticism, initiative, and a willingness to examine ideas and "facts" critically are the essential prerequisites of the course. We will read, listen, discuss, write, and do a lot in PS 300, consistent with its four credit-hour value. Class discussions often move freely from assigned readings to the latest news. Because the course's subject matter is by its nature something of a moving target, we may decide as we go along to modify the course plan somewhat. "We" means all of us, together.

Grading is on a standard, no-curve 100-point system. You will write eight 750-word papers over the course of the term, worth 80 percent of your grade, altogether. The other 20 percent of your grade is based on your contribution to learning in your discussion section. You must attend lectures and your discussion sections. You may be asked to attend relevant events outside of our scheduled meeting times. In sections, you must be current in the readings and prepared to engage in informed, critical discussion each and every time. If you do that, we will all learn a lot and enjoy the experience. If you aren't really interested in assuming that much responsibility for your learning and the learning of your classmates then this is probably not the course for you.

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POLSCI 353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Tessler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Section 024.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

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POLSCI 396 / REES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / HISTORY 333 / SOC 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

Section 001 The Political Economy of Transformation in East Central Europe. Meets with REES 397.001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 397.001.

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POLSCI 401. Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent.

Section 001 History of Political Thought from Hobbes through Nietzsche.

Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing or two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey the history of political thought from Hobbes through Nietzsche. We will focus on changing conceptions of the purpose of political society, the origins of political authority, the nature and value of political participation, and the nature of liberty and equality through intensive reading of the primary texts of Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, John Stuart Mill, and Marx. Brief selections from other authors will be included. All readings will be from the original works. There are no secondary textbooks for this class. Two meetings per week will be devoted to lectures and discussion. The course will divide up and meet in one hour of discussion sections as well. There will be one in-class midterm examination, two brief papers, and a final examination.

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POLSCI 402. Selected Topics in Political Theory.

Section 001 American Political Thought.

Instructor(s): Anne M Manuel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 400 or 401. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 411. American Political Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arthur Lupia

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 412. Courts, Politics and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 414. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Francene M Engel (fengel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (4). (Excl). May be repeated twice, for a total of six credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 415. The American Chief Executive.

Section 001 The American Presidency.

Instructor(s): Scott Curtis James

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411; or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an inquiry into the origins, structure, and operation of the modern American presidency. Its purpose is to familiarize students with the concepts and issues at the center of contemporary political science scholarship on the presidency. Three normative concerns broadly guide the organization of this course: First, generally speaking, do Americans get the kind of president they want? Put differently, what are the qualities we expect our presidents to possess in office and how successfully do our electoral institutions select for such individuals? Second, what are the determinants of effective presidential leadership? That is to say, why are some presidents more successful than others at exerting their influence over the governing process? And third, what is the proper role of the presidency in the contemporary American political system? Are the powers of the presidency adequate to the tasks expected of presidents? Does the growth of presidential power present a challenge to traditional notions of republican government? We will begin with an examination of the constitutional origins of the presidency. What role did the Framers intend the president to play in the American political system, and to what extent did the early presidency conform to these expectations? Subsequent weeks will focus on the nature of the modern presidency. Topics will include presidential selection, the elements of presidential power and authority, the presidency and the party system, and the institutional presidency.

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POLSCI 417. Legislative Process.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey L Bernstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses primarily on the U.S. Congress. We will look at congressional elections, congressional procedures and the policies they generate, and how Congress relates to the other branches of government. Congress' members must make laws for the nation as a whole, but also must represent the narrow, parochial interests of their districts. We will pay much attention this term to questions about how Congress manages to make responsible policies while remaining responsive to the electorate.

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POLSCI 419 / CAAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

Section 001 Black Americans & the Political System.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science; AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. The course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms the political process. Finally, the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

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POLSCI 420 / COMM 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

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POLSCI 428 / ASIAN 428 / PHIL 428 / SOC 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001 Politics and Development in China.

Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 444. Government and Politics of Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Is Russian democracy an oxymoron (like postal service) or a genuine possibility? This course focuses primarily on the evolution of political processes and institutions since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 in order, primarily, to address that question. The course covers the political economy of the transition from the Soviet system, voting and other forms of political participation, the role of external actors inluding the United States and various NGOs and IGOs, relations between Moscow and Russia's regions, and high politics in a strongly presidential system.

All students will have the same assignments. Students will write a book review, a short op ed piece for the New York Times, and a term paper. In doing the latter, students are strongly encouraged, though not required, to do collaborative papers and to use one or more of several data sets about Russian attitudes that I will provide (I and the teaching assistant will provide assistance in learning the basics of data analysis.) There will be an in-class midterm, and a take-home final distributed on the last day of classes.

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POLSCI 457. Governments and Politics of India and South Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ashutosh Varshney

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 460. Problems in World Politics.

Section 001 Pol of Global Trade & Finance.

Instructor(s): Paul K Huth

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 468. Cooperation and Conflict in the International System.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We begin by discussing what the international system is, consider the possibility of multiple international systems, and describe some of the history of the modern international system(s). We then turn to consideration of patterns of cooperation and of conflict within the system. We will seek to understand why it is that some members of the system can cooperate in rather remarkable ways, while at other times overt conflict erupts. When discussing cooperation we will pay close attention to arguments about why international cooperation should be especially hard to achieve, and will speculate on ways to overcome these difficulties. Students will be awarded grades based on their performance in two exams and a term paper.

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POLSCI 469. Politics of International Economic Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jude C Hays

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 160. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

With the end of the Cold War and the acceleration of international economic integration, political scientists interested in international relations have increasingly turned their attention to the politics of global trade and finance. This area of study, known as international political economy (or simply IPE), focuses on the familiar connections between power and wealth, states and markets, and economics and politics in order to gain a better understanding of the political underpinnings of the global economy as well as the influences that international economics has on national and international politics. Are free trade and multipolarity compatible? Does economic globalization undermine democracy and popular sovereignty? Along these lines, an important focus of this course is whether the institutions that currently govern international economic activity are robust enough to survive important political and economic changes that are currently taking place in the world. For example, we will consider whether the domestic political coalitions that have traditionally supported free trade are breaking up as a result of increased international capital mobility and whether the international cooperation necessary to manage the global economy can survive significant changes in the international distribution of power.

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POLSCI 471. The American Foreign Policy Process.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Edwards

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 478. Political Economy of Transition.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John E Jackson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The major theme of the course is to examine the joint processes of political and economic transformation. Successful transitions are largely evolutionary. New organizations and institutions arise to replace older, outmoded forms of production and governance. The course will compare and contrast different types of institutional arrangements. Most of the course will be devoted to examining a series of countries and regions that have chosen or been forced into some form of economic and political transition. The examples will include countries moving from centrally planned economies and one-party authoritarian governments to a market economy and democratic governments; developed democracies needing to transform their own economies in the face of global competition and new technologies; and developing countries trying to move away from resource-based economies or to overcome the devastation of local conflicts. Readings include writing by Schumpeter, Krugman, Elster, Przeworski, Kornai, Sachs, Hellman, and Wade, among others.

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POLSCI 481. Junior Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to Honors concentrators with junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 483. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Poli. Sci. 111, 140, 410, or 411. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 Intro to Political Economy. (3 Credit).

Instructor(s): Robert J Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~franzese/SyllabiEtc.html

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 002 The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements. (3 credits). Meets with German 493.001.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 493.001.

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POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 003 Political Parties with the EU. 3 credits.

Instructor(s): Anton Pelinka

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 490. Game Theory and Formal Models.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth W Kollman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the use of game theory in political science. Game theory is the study of mathematical models of conflict and cooperation between rational decision makers. The course will emphasize the fundamental assumptions behind game theory models of politics and will expose students to models of legislatures, voting and elections, international relations, and political participation. Students should have a useful facility with algebra before taking the course.

Course requirements include homework, two midterms and a paper.

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POLSCI 492. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of eight credits. Pol. Sci. 491 and 492 may be elected for a combined maximum of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A directed study course on an individual research topic that is developed between an individual student and a faculty member.

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POLSCI 494. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s): John C Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a seminar for seniors who are working an on Honors thesis. Students must be admitted to the Honors program before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Section 001 Theorizing the Political Subject.

Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will read a selection of plays by the ancient Greek playwrights, Machiavelli, and Shakespeare as works of political theory which give insight into the central concepts for the study of politics such as justice, political virtue, political leadership, community, foundations of political authority, legitimacy, and obligation.

There will be one play assigned each week. Some background material will also be assigned but the primary focus will be on the plays.

There will be several short papers due during the term and a final paper which analyzes the political theory of a play not read in class.

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POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 001 Political Participation and Voting Behavior.

Instructor(s): Cara Wong (cjwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a seminar on voting and elections in the U.S., with an emphasis on presidential and congressional campaigns. We will examine elections from the perspectives of candidates, political parties, interest groups, the media, and voters. In addition, we will address some basic questions about election laws and processes, as well as the role of elections in American politics. Why do so many Americans fail to vote? How can turnout be increased and is low voter turnout a problem? Why do incumbents tend to win reelection at such high rates? How do the media and campaign finance laws influence electoral outcomes? And, does racial redistricting advance or undermine Black representation?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 002 Theories of Diversity.

Instructor(s): Scott E Page (spage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will study diversity and its impact in political, economic, social, and physical environments. We will cast a wide net touching on subjects as varied as racial segregation, what people wear and eat, genetic diversity, comparitve economic advantage, product diversity, ideological diversity, social networks, and measurements of intelligence. Students should have an interest in politics and public policy and be willing to learn the sort of mathematical models used in MBA programs, law schools, and graduate social science programs, e.g., simple game theory and complex systems models. The point of this course is to understand why we see diversity, and how and why homogeneous and heterogeneous systems differ.

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POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 003 Constitutional Theory.

Instructor(s): Francene M Engel (fengel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 001 Canadian Politics.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 002 Comparative Constitutional Design.

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Constitutions define the rules by which we are governed. When we write our constitution, we make a contract with one another and with our future selves; we define possibilities and we close doors. This course takes an interest-based approach to the study of constitution-building: through comparisons of nearly a dozen cases we will consider how founders balance short-term (adoption) and long-term (stability) goals. We will examine how different institutional structures create winners and losers in society, and how well founders understand the effect of their designs at the time of adoption. We will study compromises made, evaluating them in terms of both short-term and long-term goals (United States, Israel). We will study constitutional change, thinking about the advantages of meeting the changing needs of society, but also its drawback; the importance of consistency, reliability, legitimacy (Canada, France) We will look at cases where a constitution was imposed upon a society (Japan, Weimar Germany) and where a society borrowed another country's institutional design (Mexico, Argentina), to better understand how local interpretations affect the meaning of the constitution. We will consider the growth of legitimacy as a constitution evolves slowly, and is sometimes not even written (Great Britain, European Union). Many of our cases are federal: one knotty issue is asymmetrical arrangements between the center and the regions (Russia, Canada, European Union). Throughout the course, we will consider the role of courts, of legislatures, and of peoples as interpreters of the constitutional document.

Texts:

  • Constitutions and Political Theory. Jan-Erik Lane. ISBN: 0719046483. Manchester University.
  • The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates. Ralph Ketcham. ISBN: 0451625250. Mentor Paperback.
  • The Strategic Constitution. Robert Cooter. ISBN: 0691058644. Princeton.
  • The Federalist. Hamilton, Madison, Jay. ISBN: 0140444955. Penguin USA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 003 Contemporary German Politics.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 001 History and Politics of Chemical and Biological Warfare Disarmament. Meets with RC Social Science 460.002.

Instructor(s): Susan Presswood Wright (spwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 460.002.

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POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 002 Global Environmental Change and the State. Political Economy of the International Monetary Fund.

Instructor(s): Martin Edwards

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


POLSCI 499. Quantitative Methods of Political Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey L Bernstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


POLSCI 529 / PUBPOL 529. Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chamberlin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math. 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 529.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 003.

Instructor(s):, Helen Graves

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


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