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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Humanities


This page was created at 5:52 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 – April 26)

Open courses in RC Humanities
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for RCHUMS

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for RC Humanities.

What's New This Week in RC Humanities.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.


RCHUMS 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 235. Topics in World Dance.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu), Jessica B Fogel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey a diversity of dance traditions throughout the world. Students will gain insight into the functions, aesthetics, history, and cultural context of dances within specific societies. Theatrical, religious, popular, and social dance traditions will be examined in a variety of cultures including groups in Africa, Japan, India, South America, Aboriginal Australia, Indonesia (Bali, Java), the Mideast, and others. A variety of broad comparative issues will be explored: How does dance reflect the values of the society which produces it? How are gender, class, relationships between individual and group, and political and spiritual values displayed through dance structures and movements? What is the creative process for producing these dance works? How is the visual imagery of dance movement designed and how can an audience decipher it? What are the basic elements of dance choreography? How do choreographic structures differ cross-culturally? How do the training, preparation, and performance practices of dancers differ cross-culturally? How do the dances of these cultures employ or integrate other art forms such as music, theater, and costume design? How are dance productions evaluated and critiqued within different cultures? In addition to lectures and readings, the class will feature several guest artist/speaker presentations, viewings of films and videos, and observations of dance rehearsals, classes, and performances.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 242. Creative Adaptation: Fact Into Fantasy.

Creative Writing

Section 001 – Creative Non-Fiction.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~balducci/creative_adaptation.html

No Description Provided.

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RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Instructor(s): Virginia W Kantor (vwk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Audition only for placement in ensembles. ALL students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Every student must register for 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in two ensembles; for two hours of credit, students must participate in a large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal, and coaching for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to fulfill the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar, and voice. This is not a mini-course!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 – Asian and Pacific Islands Music in Colonial Contexts.

Instructor(s): Sylvia Chao

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the impact of colonial encounter on music as both an art expression and a human activity with social and political functions. Colonialism is often considered destructive to local societies and cultures as it imposes power and violence from without. On the other hand, from the perspective of cultural interaction, colonial contact may be seen as introducing a new dimension of creativity. In many cases, colonial encounter has significantly influenced the way people think and express themselves culturally, ethnically, and nationalistically. Music is one prime example for understanding the cultural aspects of colonialism.

To provide a comparative understanding of individual music cultures in colonial contexts, this course presents several case studies of music in Asian and Pacific Islands societies, including Japan, Taiwan, China, the Philippines, and Hawaii. In each case study, we will survey the music culture as it is practiced today with reference to its production in historical and social contexts. Colonial contact in this region has brought in much impact on the continuation, modification, and creation of many musical genres, rendering contested notions of "tradition," "traditional music," and "contemporary music," to name a few. Taking music as a key to arrive at a better understanding of both the music itself and the people who produce it, we will analyze music as an artistic expression that reflects the socio-cultural processes of continuity, change, conflict, and adaptation in response to colonial encounters.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 – Mixed Choral Ensemble. This course meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

Instructor(s): Brandon Brack

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

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RCHUMS 255. Film Experience.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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RCHUMS 280 / ENGLISH 245 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E.J. Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

RCHUMS 281. Introduction to Comedy and Tragedy.

Drama

Section 001 – Inside the Dramatic Experience: Script Analysis and the Elements of Theater Production.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu) , Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 280. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive introduction on how to read a play and interpret it for live stage production. Students will engage the viewpoints of director, actor, and dramaturge (literary/historical specialist) in practical exercises and prepared scenes. Work will focus, in this instance, on modern American one-act plays or scenes from full-length plays from the works of Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, Lorraine Hansberry, Sam Shepard, Marsha Norman, Richard Nelson, and others, in a stylistic continuum from Realism through Poetic Realism to the Absurd. Theoretical readings and written exercises will complement Midterm and End-of-Term studio productions of works acted and directed by the members of the course under the direct supervision of the instructors. (Required course for the proposed "Text-into- Performance" minor.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 282. Drama Interpretation I: Actor and Text.

Drama

Section 001 – Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekhov.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this acting class students will delve into the works of two of the major playwrights of modern European drama, Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekov. Ibsen was both a poet and a social realist – his play The Doll House was a revolutionary work about human freedom. Chekov's intricate portraits of a dying artistocracy in pre-revolutionary Russia inspired the development of Stanislavski's techniques of "method acting" – the basis for modern acting technique.

Students will explore several important works by each writer through script analysis and scene study. The actors will also be responsible for dramaturgical research on relevant topics concerning Norway and Russia at the turn of the 20th century. However the emphasis will be active participation in the acting process on these plays. The course is open to students who have taken the First Year Seminar in drama, the Actor and Text course on the American family, and interested students with some previous acting experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 305(RCIDIV 257). Cultural Confrontation in the Arts.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – Class reserved for sophomores and above.

Instructor(s): Susan P Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Minorities are subjected to misrepresentation, efforts to rob them of their cultural identity, internal colonization, and racial prejudice. This course focuses on the aesthetic responses of different minority groups when they come into contact with the dominant culture.

The emphasis is on an intensive engagement with representative texts or visual images that are produced at such "moments" of confrontation. Minority responses to the confrontation include conflict, compromise, assimilation, and resistance. Examples of fiction, film, music, dance, paintings, and poetry will be presented in order to encourage an awareness of cultures other than one's own.

Guest speakers from a variety of academic departments in LS&A will give many of the lectures. The course focuses on minorities in the U.S. (Asian-Americans, Latino-Americans, and African-Americans), with a few lectures devoted to minorities in other areas of the world. Course objectives include: (1) to foster an awareness of the cultures of others by letting them speak in their own voices and by learning to listen carefully both to what is said and how it is said; (2) to understand that the responses of these cultures to the impact of the dominant culture have to be explored through questions of form and language, and that these questions are often related to the undermining of tradition and the crisis of cultural identity; (3) to help students refine their skills in verbal and textual analysis; and (4) to encourage students to reflect on how the issues of the course are played out in their own lives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 312 / SLAVIC 312. Central European Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Issues.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Slavic Linguistics, Literary Theory, Film, and Surveys 312.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 315. Representations of History in the Literature and Visual Arts of Rome.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – The Art of Rome.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

And I saw with my own eyes the Cumaean Sybil herself, hanging in a bottle, and when the little boy asked her, 'Sybil, what do you want?' she answered 'I want to die' – Petronius The Satyricon

T.S. Eliot begins The Wasteland with this quotation from Petronius in order to ground his representation of the 20th century in the despair of the great ancient prophetess. The Cumaean Sybil, voice of Apollo, once spoke from the earth and foresaw the founding of Rome; but for Petronius and Eliot alike, she is no more than a vestige, a freak, who has come to the end of her own history. Her spiraling visions, once inscribed on laurel leaves, have narrowed to a point of emptiness, and scattered.

This course will examine the relation between history and prophecy in the literature and the visual arts of Rome. We will study not only the ways in which Romans wrote and represented their own history, but also how they figured that history through myth, and shaped it as oracular utterance.

The histories of Rome, its myths and oracles, were imbued with the sacred. But they were also (even in their own time) subject to skeptical deconstruction. Petronius was not alone in his wry and melancholy assessment. Indeed, the Roman muse is at once the voice of grandeur and the impresario of the profane. This unsettling tension creates what is sometimes called "Roman realism" – a mode of representation which was, as we shall see, far from objective, documentary, or empirical, and closer to the irony and betrayal of the mask.

  1. Inventing Myth
    1. Cicero, On the Nature of the Gods
    2. Virgil, The Aeneid
    3. The Roman appropriation of Greek art: sculpture and painting
  2. Staging History
    1. Suetonius, The Lives of the Caesars
    2. Roman portrait sculpture
    3. Flavius Josephus, The Jewish War
    4. The Arch of Titus
    5. The Sebasteion of Aphrodisias
    6. Tacitus, Agricola and Germania
    7. Roman battle sarcophagi
    8. Marcus Aurelius, The Meditations
    9. The columns of Trajan and Marcus Aurelius
  3. A Theater of Desire
    1. Petronius, The Satyricon
    2. Roman wall painting
  4. Prophecy and Pastoral
    1. Virgil, The Fourth Eclogue
    2. The Passion of St. Perpetua and St. Felicitas
    3. Vergilius Romanus
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 318. Critical Approaches to Literature.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – Figure, Interior, Landscape.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Contemporary critical and cultural analysis has problematized traditional reference points in painting and writing: the figure, the interior, the landscape. As definable entities, as locatable sites, as arenas of human habitation and desire, these reference points seem to have lost their anchoring power.

This course will examine a group of American writers and painters whose works occur on the threshold of this change. "Figure, interior, landscape" unfold within their works as troubled, anxious, ruptured presences. We will approach these ruptures in theoretical as opposed to sociological terms – as effects which occur on the margins of a genre, then migrate to the center.

One question (although not the only) that these works ask is, given this troubled environment, what becomes of the religious sense – the ancient tie that binds the human subject to nature and to nature's god? Can it be explained away, argued or shamed into non-existence? Were the traditional genres underwritten by religious categories of thought or representation? When these categories collapse, what is the status of the remnant?

Another and possibly related question is the problem of beauty. What is its origin? Its goal? Is it an epiphenomenon of language? A mirage of mirages? The advent of terror that "we are just able to bear?" And how do figures, interiors, and landscapes stand in relation to this enigmatic presence?

Connected to this class, there will be a show at the Residential College Gallery of Art, curated by artist and faculty member Larry Cressman. The show, called "Figure, Interior, Landscape," will be devoted to a selection of works by contemporary American artists. The selection will focus primarily on works on paper.

Although not required, interested students might consider taking a studio course to complement HUMS 318. RC ARTS 287, Printmaking or RC ARTS 288, Introduction to Drawing class would be excellent choices.

Texts/sources include: J.D. Salinger, A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Franny and Zooey; Edward Hopper's paintings; Sylvia Plath, The Colossus; Mark Rothko's paintings; Flannery O'Connor, The Violent Bear it Away; Barnett Newman's paintings; Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita; Jasper Johns' paintings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 322. Advanced Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults.

Creative Writing

Section 001 – Advanced Writing for Children. Prerequisite: RCHUMS 222 or Permission of Instructor.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~balducci/advanced.html

No Description Provided.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura K Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura K Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – Introduction to World Performance. Meets with Theatre and Drama 212.001.

Instructor(s): Mbala Nkanga (mbalank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 212.001.

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RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 003 – Dada and Surrealism. Meets with History of Art 376.001

Instructor(s): Matthew Biro (mbiro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 376.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 004 – Balanchine and American Dance.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 005 – Immigrant Identities in American Film: the Irish and the Chinese. Meets with RC Social Science 360.004

Instructor(s): Claire A Conceison, Benjami Zvi Novick

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 360.004.

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RCHUMS 340. Four Interdisciplinary Studies in 19th and 20th Century Intellectual History: Psychoanalysis, Mysticism, Nihilism and Marxism.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior/senior standing. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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RCHUMS 348(452) / RUSSIAN 348. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 – Late 19th-Century Russian Fiction and Drama.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 348.001.

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RCHUMS 350. Creative Musicianship.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Felicia Ann-Barbara Sandler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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RCHUMS 351. Creative Musicianship Lab.

Music

Section 001 – (credits?).

Instructor(s): Felicia A Sandler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 350. (1-2). (CE). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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RCHUMS 357. What Television Means: Research, Analysis, and Interpretation.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra Smith Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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RCHUMS 360. The Existential Quest in the Modern Novel.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior/senior standing. (4). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him."
(Nietzsche)
"If there is not God, then everything is permitted."
(Dostoevsky)
"Everything that exists is born without reason,
Continues to live out of weakness,
And dies by chance."
(Sartre)

Existentialism combines the investigation of major issues in the history of Western philosophy with daily problems of intense personal concern. In this course, existentialism will be viewed as a literary as well as philosophical movement united by a number of recurrent and loosely related themes:

  1. Theological: the disappearance of God; the condition of being "thrown" into an indifferent and ultimately absurd universe; man's encounter with nothingness beneath the floor of everyday reality revealed when familiar objects and language drop away.
  2. Psychological: man's imperfection, fragility, and loneliness; the feeling of anxiety and despair over the emptiness of life and the terror of death; arguments for and against suicide; human nature as fundamentally ambiguous and hence not explicable in scientific thought or in any metaphysical system; the absence of a universally valid morality; and human nature as undetermined and free.
  3. Social: man's rebellion against the inhumanity of social institutions that suffocate the "authentic self"; the escape from individual responsibility into the "untruth of the crowd."
  4. Finally, man's various attempts to transform nihilistic despair into a creative affirmation of life.

Philosophic texts by Pascal, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Buber; fiction by Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Camus, Sartre, and Kafka. Two examinations and one term paper required. Permission of the instructor is NOT required for this course.

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RCHUMS 375(475) / CHIN 360 / ASIAN 360 / HISTART 387 / PHIL 360. The Arts and Letters of China.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chinese 360.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 – Fathers and Sons.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Be it the relationship between Odysseus and his son Telemachus in The Odyssey, or Creon and his son Haemon in Antigone, or Noah and his sons in The Old Testament – from the beginning of literature relationships between fathers and sons have often involved complex and passionate emotions, the source and meaning of which elude the pair's understanding. Fathers may have narcissistic expectations for their sons, who certainly expect, indeed need, their fathers to be models of behavior, attitudes, and beliefs. It is satisfying, even inspiring, when a father fulfills these expectations – and in our study we shall encounter a number who do – but not all fathers can, or do, fulfill them. This often results in torturous confrontations and long standing conflicts.

We will examine a variety of narratives that tell of both harmonious and troubled relationships: novels such as Chain Potok's The Chosen, Saul Bellow's Seize the Day, Richard Russo's The Risk Pool, short stories such as Ernest Hemingway's Indian Camp, The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife, "comic" books such as Art Spiegelman's Maus: A Survivor's Tale, I and II, plays such as Arthur Miller's The Death of a Salesman or Eugene O'Neills A Long Days Journey into Night or Athol Fugard's Master Harold…and the boys, poems such as Ken Mikolowski's Michael/Alternatives, autobiographies such as Philip Roth's Patrimony, and films such as Pat Conroy's The Great Santini or Elia Kazan's East of Eden. For purposes of comparison, we will read one work that deals with a mother-daughter relationship. Students will write at least two papers plus a midterm and final exam. Films will be viewed at night.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura K Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura K Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 – Medieval Drama Workshop. (2 credits).

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated four times, for a total of four credits. Can be elected more than once in the same term.

Foreign Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An exploratory workshop in the secular drama of the late Middle Ages (particularly the farces and Carnival plays of France and Germany) leading to performance/workshop venues of Andrieu de la Vigne's Miracle of the Blind Man and Cripple and Hans Sachs' Death in the Tree (with other possible works) at the 36th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo in early May and the 2-7 July meeting of the Societe internationale pour l'etude du theatre medieval (SITM) in Groningen, The Netherlands. Both actors and researchers, design and directing students welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 002 – Performance Workshop. (2 Credits).

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated four times, for a total of four credits. Can be elected more than once in the same term.

Foreign Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Contemporary scholars have recently theorized what theater artists have long known: gender is a kind of performance. In this course, we'll examine the way scholars have critiqued our most common assumptions surrounding gender – that it is biological and comes only two flavors – and look at the way actors, performance artists, and playwrights have created their own theories of gender for the stage. We'll also examine the way that each of us constructs our own gender performances daily and use this information to create original performance pieces.

Holly Hughes, noted performance artist, and Kate Mendeloff, who has taught classes on contemporary gender plays, team up for this course which explores gender theory through reading, discussion, and theatre exercises. The course will also focus on recent plays that confront issues of gender identity and will culminate in a festival of new performance work generated out of the class itself. The class is open to performers, directors and students committed to gender study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 003 – Carnival: Old World and New. (2 Credits).

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated four times, for a total of four credits. Can be elected more than once in the same term.

Foreign Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the origins of the festival of Carnival in the sacred and secular calendars of medieval Europe and proceed to a survey of European Carnival expressions in drama, music, and art in the Renaissance and Early Modern periods, concluding with an examination of current Carnival practice in both the Old World (Belgium, Rhineland, Black Forest, Riviera, northern Italy) and the New (Trinidad, New Orleans, Mexico, Rio de Janeiro, and Bahia). The course will combine study of the history and theory of Carnival (Goethe's "Roman Carnival" essay, Bakhtin's Rabelais and His World, etc.) with scene-work in early Carnival farces (particularly the German Fastnachtspiele) and dancing/performing in contemporary or historical Carnival. Opportunities for acting, directing, designing, and translating, as well as in-the-field reporting (turn your trip to New Orleans' Mardi Gras into academic credit!).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for RCHUMS.


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