GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Courses in DUTCH (DIVISION 357)

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. (4). (LR).

This course, a continuation of 111, proceeds with the basic grammar of the Dutch language. We will primarily use the monolingual text LEVEND NEDERLANDS (Living Dutch), in which each lesson consists of an everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a comprehensive vocabulary list of one topic, questions about the conversation, discussion and homework. To enliven the class, the teacher will present the students with a variety of texts, music, video, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. Cost:1 WL:3 (Broos)

232. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 231 or the equivalent. (4). (LR).

This course, a continuation of Dutch 231, will further examine the particular difficulties and subtleties of Dutch grammar and style. Grammatical items introduced in previous courses will be reviewed where necessary. Introduction to contemporary Dutch society by means of songs, video, comics, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course, which will be conducted mostly in Dutch. Cost:1 WL:3 (Broos)

491. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

This course is conducted in English by the Dutch writer in residence, novelist Martin Bril. It starts with a survey of modern Dutch literature, then it centers on the reading and analyzing of two of Holland's most important novels (one pre-World War II, one post World War II, both available in translation). The second part of the course will be "creative writing" from a European point of view. It will focus on the short story. Students are supposed to write at least three stories and will participate in a joint writing project . the course is open to all lovers of text, literary or otherwise, both American and European. Of course, students will also have the opportunity to exchange views on culture, literature, the business of writing, etc., with a professional writer, and the differences between European and American literature will also be discussed. Regular class attendance, participation in class discussions and writing assignments will be required. (Bril)

495. Topics in Dutch Literature. Dutch 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course will examine prose and poetry of both the Netherlands and Belgium. Issues like the influence of the Second World War, feminist writing, Dutch Indies Literature are among the many topics that will provide the students with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and point of view of (modern) Dutch literature. In cooperation with the writer in residence, the student will have the unique opportunity to exchange ideas and opinions with the author about his works. The course will be conducted totally in Dutch. Cost:1 (Broos)

German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100. (4). (LR).

First course of a two-term sequence in elementary German. The first-year program is designed to develop the ability to understand and speak "everyday German", to develop reading and writing skills, and to get to know the German-speaking world through discussions and readings. Ample opportunity is provided to develop conversational skills in a wide variety of situations encountered in German-speaking cultures. Additional time outside of class is required to listen to cassettes, to watch videos, to work on the computer, to read, and to study the structure of the German language. There are chapter tests and a final. The language of instruction is German. Cost:2 WL:2

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Second course of a two-term sequence in elementary German. See German 101 for a general description. Cost:2 WL:2

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 102. (4). (LR).

Course for students who have had two to three years of high school German or one or more terms of college German not at the University of Michigan but who are not yet at second-year performance level. This course is designed to develop the ability to understand and speak "everyday German," to develop reading and writing skills, and to get to know the German-speaking world through discussions and readings. Ample opportunity is provided to develop conversational skills in a wide variety of situations encountered in German-speaking cultures. Additional time outside of class is required to listen to cassettes, to watch videos, to work on the computer, to read, and to study the structure of the German language. There are three major tests and a final. These sections meet FIVE times per week. Students may enroll in 231 upon satisfactory completion of this course. The language of instruction is German. Cost:2 WL:2

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of the class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. The course prerequisite is German 111 or a placement examination (CEEB, GSFLT, or departmental). Like German 111, German 112 is open only to graduate students and undergraduates in special programs. Cost:1 WL:1

230. Intensive Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 221, 222, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

This course provides highly motivated students the opportunity to complete the two-term intermediate German sequence in one term. You will be expected to increase the level of accuracy at which you can express yourself and the range of situations in which you can function in German-speaking cultures. We will read and discuss a variety of brief fiction and non-fiction texts, e.g. fairy tales, short stories, newspaper and magazine articles. Toward the end of the term, we will read a longer literary work, such as DER RICHTER UND SEIN HENKER or DIE PHYSIKER. There will be an extensive review of German grammar; however, the majority of the class time will be devoted to discussing the assigned texts and working on small group activities. Films, short videos, and contemporary German music will supplement classroom instruction. There will be weekly quizzes on individual readings and grammatical features as well as a comprehensive final. You will also have to write compositions regularly. The language of instruction is German. Cost:2 WL:2

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

Third of a four-term sequence in contemporary German. The second-year, or intermediate, program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. There will be an intermediate grammar review and selected readings. There are three hourly tests and a final examination. Students write essays related to class readings. The language of instruction is German. Cost:3 WL:2

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR).

Final course of the 4-term sequence in contemporary German. See individual section descriptions for information on topics and procedures.

Section 003 (paired with 009) Ausländer in Deutschland. This section will explore the "Ausländer-experience" in Germany starting with the influx into the then Bundesrepublik of foreign workers (Gastarbeiter) shortly after the end of WW II. We will examine the economic, geographic, social, political and cultural ramifications of this influx, with special emphasis on the resulting clash of cultures in Germany. These will be examined as they are presented by the Gastarbeiter and his family writing in German about their everyday life and experiences in Germany. We will be examining various genres and media presentations of the problem, such as prose, drama, film, poetry, music, newspaper and magazine articles, radio plays, and television. A brief look at post-Reunification developments in the "new" Bundesrepublik will round out the course. In addition to the readings and media activities, the students will write a number of essays and two short exams during this half of the term. The language of instruction is German. (Van Valkenberg)

Section 004 The Geography of German. This section will deal with two interrelated topics: Landeskunde (Geography) and Dialektologie (Dialectology). What differentiates Northern Germany from Southern Germany? Zürich from Berlin? Vienna from Hamburg? Is it more than mountains or oceans, the way holidays are celebrated, the stories that children are told, the politics, the regional costumes, the food served at breakfast, or the jokes? Where does the question of variation of language over space fit into this question? We will look at the topographical and cultural geography of German-speaking Europe; as part of this process, we will consider in some depth the question of language variation over space, or dialectology. Course materials will include: a course pack for readings, maps, and dialect atlases (which will be held on reserve). Evaluation will be based on a number of short essays, two (short) exams, quizzes, and participation and quality of contribution. The language of instruction is German. (Lippi-Green)

Section 005 (paired with 004) Regional Literature. This section, to be offered together with Section 004 The Geography of German will explore the concept of "Heimat" ("homeland") in its historical and literary contexts. How has the definition of "Heimat" changed over time, and what does it mean for German-speaking people from different places in different historical periods? How did Hitler's Reich pervert the concept? How did the displacement and exile of hundreds of thousands of German-speaking people recast it? What kind of language and metaphor are used in literature that evokes a "Heimat"? The partner section of this course (004) looks at the topographical and cultural geography of approximately six geographic regions in German-speaking Europe; in this section, we will follow that study with an analysis of representative literature from these regions by some of the best known authors of Austria, Germany, and Switzerland, ranging from the early 19th century to the present. Course materials will include: a course pack for readings, maps, video tapes of the TV film "Heimat" (to be held in the Language Resource Center). Evaluation will be based on several short essays, one or two hourly exams, quizzes, and participation and quality of contribution. The language of instruction is German. (Fries)

Section 006 (paired with 007) Philosophy and Science. The intent of this section is to acquaint students with the vocabulary of scientific and philosophical German, to familiarize them with some of the historical issues, and to provide opportunities to work toward an active command of these disciplinary languages. We will devote the first four weeks to abridged versions of popular scientific essays from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by Alexander von Humboldt, Hermann von Helmholtz, Ernst Mach, and Wolf Lepenies. These essays will introduce the central vocabulary of the various disciplines, recount important episodes in the history of science, and address central philosophical issues. A three-page, expository paper on this material, written in German, will be due at the end of the fourth week. The final three weeks will be devoted to brief selections from Kant (epistemology), Nietzsche (ethics), and Wittgenstein (logic, philosophy of language), and to three short articles from German scientific periodicals. Students will be asked to write, in German, either a three-page response to one of the philosophers, or a 250-word abstract of each of the articles, depending on their interests. Difficult constructions and some vocabulary in the readings will be glossed in advance, but the texts themselves will be straight out of the library, and students will otherwise be expected to learn how to read such difficult material on their own with the aid of a dictionary. In addition, each student will be asked to make one brief oral presentation, in German and from notes alone, in which they explain to their classmates an important scientific or philosophical concept such as "phototropism," "hypothesis," or "valence." The language of instruction is German. (Amrine)

Section 007 (paired with 006) Music. It is the purpose of this section to help students with a strong interest in music to apply their German language skills to this area. The will be done in a variety of ways which will be brought together in a course pack. (a) The most obvious area is music based on German texts, not only Romantic Lieder (Schubert, Schumann), but also some motets (Schütz), cantatas (Bach), librettos (Mozart, Wagner), and some modern Lieder (Mahler, Wolf, Schönberg). (b) A second group of readings will comprise texts written by German musicians (Mozart's letters, Schumann's essays, various performers' lectures). (c) The third body will consist of short articles biographical, historical, analytical - on music and musicians, written in German and unavailable in English. both students with performing ambitions and those with a primarily historical or receptive interest in music should thus be able to integrate their German studies into their future careers. The language of instruction is German. (Seidler)

Section 009 (paired with 003) Cultures in Conflict - German Reunification. This course will cover aspects of the recent reunification of the two German states. We will begin with a survey of German political geography from 1800 to the present, including readings and discussion of the fragmented German political landscape before 1870. The historical concepts of the First, Second, and Third Reich will be discussed in the context of immediate post-WW II antipathy toward the central state. Reading will also cover the traditional dialect regions and their mutual animosities, as well as the political relationship of the two Germanies to each other during the forty years of separation. We will read excerpts of books, contemporary newspaper and periodical articles and analyses, and possibly view films covering the events of 1989 to the present in Germany. Initially, we will concentrate on events in the German Democratic Republic, particularly the political situation, as well as the successful strategy of emigration by citizens of the GDR. We will cover the fall of the GDR government, as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall, then explore the political maneuvering between the GDR and the Federal Republic which led to the vote on reunification. Particular aspects to be explored include the question of the validity of land reform and property rights in the former GDR, the massive social adjustments necessary in the new territory of the FRG (particularly in the areas of social security, health insurance, and job security), the political reorganization of the former GDR, and the rise of racism and hatred of foreigners in the East. Evaluation: There will be occasional grammar quizzes as needed, a midterm examination, and a final examination. In addition, students will be expected to submit weekly short essays in German describing their reactions to the current readings, and to prepare an aspect of a selected topic for an oral presentation in class. Examinations will include an oral component. The language of instruction is German. (Koby)

325. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The sequence of German 325 and 326 is required for concentration in German. It is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final Cost:2 WL:4

326. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

See German 325.

351. Business German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The course is designed to introduce students to the terminology and practices of procedures used in German business, industry, trade, banking and insurance and the journals, newspapers and reports covering their activities. The subjects covered range from advertising to financial transactions and reports. The course is a continuation of German 350 which is not a prerequisite to 351. The text will consist of readings from actual German business reports and transactions taken from journals, newspapers and professional journals and advertising. The emphasis in the course will be on banking, commerce and international trade. There will be a selected list of outside reading in English such as William Manchester's THE ARMS OF KRUPP and others. Cost:1 WL:4 (Fabian)

382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German dramas of the 19th and 20th centuries. These dramas reflect not only the main literary but also the significant cultural and political trends of the period. In conjunction with German 381, 383, 384, or 385 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of individual plays, but the instructor will include some biographical, literary and historical background. The texts are by Hauptmann, Schnitzler, Kaiser, Brecht, Durrenmatt and Frisch. The major language is German, but not exclusively. A term paper will be assigned. It may be in English. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. Cost:1 WL:2 (Cowen)

383. German Lyric Poetry. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course introduces students with a few years of the language to German lyric poetry, written from the age of Goethe to the present. We will use the latest edition of the anthology by Echtermeyer and von Wiese, Deutsche Gedichte and we will supplement it with mimeographed materials and (for Lieder settings) with records and tapes. During the first half of the term, we will learn the basic principles of metrics and traditional poetic forms. But the main purpose and the focus of the course is the comparative analysis and critical interpretation of selected poems. The possibilities as well as the limits of interpretation and evaluation will be established through discussions. We will also take a close look at some published translations and will attempt our own English versions. Method: Guided discussions (instructor will speak German, students have choice) and occasional background lectures. Student evaluation: Several short interpretive papers, a midterm and a final exam, all to be done in English on the basis of the German texts. (Seidler)

385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German short stories and novellas of the twentieth century, from the periods before and between the world wars (Mann and Kafka) to recent prose fiction (Grass). In conjunction with German 381, 382, 383, or 384 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of the individual works, but some historical and literary background material will be included. The texts read in recent terms were by Kafka, Mann, Musil, Boll, Durrenmatt and Grass. The major language is German, but not exclusively. Two short interpretive papers will be assigned for the term; they may be in English or German. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. Cost:1 WL:4

426. Intermediate Composition and Conversation. German 325 and 326; or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

In this course various approaches will be used to improve the student's proficiency. Since only German is used in this class, it cannot be taken in fulfillment of the ECB requirement. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape on the history and culture of the German-speaking countries and to use it as a departure point for an essay. Video cassettes will also be integrated into the course. Each student is expected to give a brief presentation and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on compositions as well as class participation. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425. Cost:1 (WL: Call the instructor at 663-9673) (Weiss)

452. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

The course presents a selection of literary masterpieces which have a bearing on our time; plays, a novel (WERTHERS LEIDEN by Goethe) as well as selections of poetry. The assigned readings will be introduced and discussed in class. Concentrators in German are expected to read the texts in the original, non-concentrators have the option to consult a translation. The syllabus will be discussed at the first meeting. There will be a midterm and a final examination. Instructor will speak German, students have the option. Cost:1 WL:4 (Schelle)

455. Nineteenth-Century German Fiction. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to introduce the students to significant works of German fiction of the nineteenth century. Particular attention will be given to the NOVELLE whose development during this period constitutes one of the major achievements of German literature. Works representing Romanticism (Tieck, Hoffmann), the BIEDERMEIERZEIT (Buchner, Gotthelf, Stifter), and Realism (Keller, Meyer, Storm, Fontane) will be explored. Student participation will be encouraged. Cost:1 WL:4 (Weiss)

504. History of the German Language. Graduate standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

In this course we will trace the development of the German language in reverse. We will start with a description of the internal structure of the modern language and how it is related to external factors, after which we will quickly trace backwards through the centuries. Major emphasis will be placed on the internal and social developments in Early New High German, Middle High German, and Old High German. The development of German will also be placed in the wider context of the Germanic languages and the Indo European language family. Language data and most readings will be in German. Linguistic terminology will be introduced as necessary to deal with the issues at hand. Evaluation will be based on class participation, presentations, and take home exams. Cost:2 WL:4 (Koby)

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

241. Introduction to German Studies. (3). (HU).
Section 001 Kant, Goethe, Nietzsche, Freud: A Genealogy of the Modern Mind.
A close reading of central texts by four writers who have arguably contributed most to the shaping of the modern mind. The focus of attention will be the "architectonic" of Kant's three Critiques: Goethe's Faust or Wilhelm Meister; Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy, Zarathustra, and Genealogy of Morals; and Freud's Interpretation of Dreams. Occasional lectures will address the larger historical contexts. Otherwise, the course will be run as a seminar: students will be expected to present and discuss substantial research in class. (Amrine)

448. Modern Classics in Translation: Mann, Kafka, Rilke, and Brecht. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Intended for students interested in modern literature, but without a knowledge of German, the course will serve as a critical introduction to the work of four major writers of this century, Mann and Kafka, Rilke and Brecht. Though the texts used will differ from year to year, the pattern will be to read a novel (this year Buddenbrooks and The Trial ) along with some shorter fiction by Mann and Kafka, as well as Rilke's only novel, Malte Laurids Brigge, and selected poetry (in translation by various American poets). Several plays by Brecht (this year: Baal, The Measures Taken, The Life of Galileo ) will be analyzed along with some of his poetry and his theoretical writings on the theatre. Students will participate in class discussion and will write a short interpretive paper on one work and a longer, researched paper on one author. There will be a final exam. (Seidler)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

First and second year SWEDISH (Swedish 104, 234) will be offered Winter Term, 1993. Taught by a lecturer from Sweden, an experienced language teacher, Swedish can be used to meet the LS&A language requirement. The program also has a third-year advanced seminar for students with proficiency in Swedish. It is Scand. 430, Colloquium in Scandinavian Literature.

Any students who would like to concentrate in Scandinavian Studies must complete two years of Swedish. Second-year proficiency in Swedish is required to participate in the University of Michigan exchange program with the University of Uppsala, Sweden. For further information, contact Marion Marzolf, Program Director, 2092 FB (747-5353).

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (4). (LR).

Second-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish, up to a level of Swedish 103. The emphasis is placed on developing communicative language skills, both written and oral, review and extension of basic grammar. Oral, written and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The textbook will be supplemented by newspaper articles, radio news, some Swedish poems, etc. The instruction will principally be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 103 or the equivalent for entry into 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

234. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 233. (4). (LR).

Fourth-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish up to a level of Swedish 233. The emphasis is placed on further developing on both oral and written communicative language skills, review and extension of Swedish grammar, Swedish literature and Swedish civics (history, politics, traditions, etc.). Extracts from Swedish novels, poems, newspaper articles, and documentary articles will be used. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed. All instruction will be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 233 or the equivalent for entry into 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

430. Colloquium in Scandinavian Literature. Reading knowledge of Swedish. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.
Colloquium on Writing.
For students with two years of Swedish (Elementary and Second-Year Swedish) or the equivalent. All writing, reading and talking will be in Swedish. The student will develop a good command of writing Swedish in different styles and will be able to discuss and analyze the written texts with other students in the group. As a bases for the writing assignments authentic Swedish texts will be read. Grades will be based on class participation, written assignment and tests. The teacher is a native speaker from Sweden. Cost:1 (Olvegård)

Scandinavian Courses in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of a Scandinavian language.

422. Modern Scandinavian Literature in English. Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Modern Danish Literature since World War II
in prose, poetry and drama will be the focus of this seminar by guest Fulbright professor from Denmark. The course will examine the Danish and Scandinavian literary tradition, influenced by European culture but retaining its own distinct values and features. Style, structure, motives, and aesthetic innovations will be examined. The literary fantastic will be a special theme, and a contemporary Danish author, Svend Aage Madsen, will visit the course to discuss his recent novel. Works from Greenland will also be read in this class. There will be reading of novels, dramas, and excerpts in English translation, and assigned student paper and oral presentation. Cost:5 WL:3 (Mose)

460. Issues in Modern Scandinavia. Introductory sociology or introductory political science, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 Scandinavia in Transition.
This course discusses the exceptionality of Scandinavian politics within the larger European framework. Topics addressed include political culture, government institutions, party systems, foreign policy, gender politics, public policies and deregulation. By invoking the major theoretical concepts, we will compare these aspects across the Scandinavian countries. Finally, the course analyzes the radical transitions these states are currently undergoing. These developments are marked by an end to the "Third Way" in welfare policies and a re-organization towards the EC. (Rasmussen)


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