Courses in RELIGION (DIVISION 457)

120/ABS 120. Introduction to Tanakh/Old Testament. (4). (HU).

See Ancient and Biblical Studies 120. (Schmidt)

179/University Courses 179. Mere Ritual, Meaningful Gesture: The Psychology of Sacred and Secular Rituals. (4). (HU).

See UC 179. (Gómez)

202/Buddhist Studies 220/Asian Studies 220. Introduction to World Religions: South and East Asia. (4). (HU).

See Buddhist Studies 220. (Lopez)

204/GNE 204. Islamic Religion: An Introduction. (4). (HU).

See General Near East 204. (Mir)

225/S&SEA 225. Hinduism. (3). (HU).

This course is an introductory survey of the social, philosophical and religious dimensions of Hinduism. Lectures and discussions will deal both with the historical development of Hinduism as well as with its contemporary practice in India and West. Cost:3 WL:3 (Huntington)

280/ABS 280. Jesus and the Gospels. (4). (HU).

See Ancient and Biblical Studies 280. (Fossum)

283/ABS 283. The Beginnings of Christianity. (4). (Excl).

See Ancient and Biblical Studies 283. (Boccaccini)

310/CAAS 335. Religion in the Afro-American Experience. (3). (HU).

This course will provide students with a general survey of the religious experience of Afro-Americans, concentrating on developments in the religious life of Black people in America. Various religious impulses within the Black community will be studied, including traditional Christianity, Islam, Judaism, cultic Christianity (as expressed in the various Pentecostal movements which have been described as "personality cults" such as those led by Father Divine, Daddy Grace Prophet Jones, and Rev. Oke.) A brief survey of the traditional African approach to religion is given in the background for a proper understanding of the ways in which the introduction of Christianity affected African people, followed by a study of the development of religion among Black people in ante-bellum America. The study of Black religion since 1900 will explore the social and political cross-currents which led to the rise of separatist religious groups in the twentieth century. The role of mainline churches and their success or failure in translating the needs and aspirations of the Black community to the larger society will be studied in relation to the civil rights struggle of the 1960s and the development of new social-action oriented religious movements. The course will conclude with an exploration of Black religious moods in contemporary society. Cost:1 WL:1 (Miles)

387. Independent Study. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Only one course from Religion 380, 387 and 487 may be elected in the same term.

This course is designed to accommodate students who may be unable to take listed offerings or have special reasons for undertaking directed readings. Course content and requirements are worked out individually between the student, the instructor and the Religion Program. For Religion Concentrators only.

404/ABS 496/Anthro. 450. Comparative Religion: Logos and Liturgy. Upperclass standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated with permission for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001: Vision, Disillusionment, and Re-vision.
Throughout the world a fundamental re-examination of moral values is taking place. The collapse of the Soviet system, widespread American disillusionment and despair, Islamic, Christian and Jewish fundamentalism, Liberation Theology, Buddhist, Hindu and Sikh questioning and challenges, as well as secular approaches to the environmental crisis signal a basic reassessment of the relation of moral vision and contemporary practice. In this year's Monday night visiting scholar lecture series, theologians, practicing religious professionals from several religious traditions, poets, humanists, and social analysts will address the demise of late twentieth century moral visions and the nature of the re-visioning which currently is underway. Both visitors from across the nation and Michigan scholars will speak. Students taking this course for credit will attend the Monday night lecture series and a Tuesday discussion group Grading will be based on contributions to the discussion group and on a series of reaction papers written for the course. (Heirich)

452/Anthro. 448. Anthropology of Religion: Ritual, Sanctity and Adaptation. Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

See Anthropology 448. (Rappaport)

481/GNE 481/Engl. 401. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I. (4). (HU).

See English 401. (Williams)

487. Independent Study. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Only one course from Religion 380, 387 and 487 may be elected in the same term.

This course is designed to accommodate students who may be able to take listed offerings or have special reasons for undertaking directed readings. Course content and requirements are worked out individually between the student, the instructor and the Program on Studies in Religion. This course is for Religion concentrators only and is approved for graduate students.

497. Senior Honors Thesis. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Each student will prepare a substantial paper under the direction of a staff member. (Open only to seniors admitted to the Honors Program.)


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