ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

French, Italian, and Spanish Placement Tests

If you are planning to take an elementary French, Italian, or Spanish class and you are a new student, freshman or transfer student, or you have not yet begun the elementary language sequence on the Ann Arbor campus, you must take the placement test in order to register for the correct course.

If you have registered for a class prior to taking the test, you will still be required to take the test in order to verify that you are in the appropriate level class.

If you have already taken French, Italian, or Spanish 101-232 on the Ann Arbor campus, or if you have already taken the placement test once, you are not eligible to take the test again. For questions regarding the LS&A language requirement, please see a general academic advisor or call POINT-10 (764-6810).

Instructions for students requesting overrides for
French or Spanish 101, 103, 231, or 232.

1. Try to find a section that will fit into your schedule, since the Department cannot guarantee every student a space in a section of his/her own choice.

However, do not register for a class that you cannot attend. You will not be eligible to override into the section of your choice if you are registered for any section of 101-232, even if you cannot attend that section.

2. As it states in the Time Schedule any registered student who misses one of the first four class meetings will be dropped from the course, thereby leaving some open spaces for those students who have been closed out.

If there is absolutely no section open which will fit your schedule, you should follow this procedure:

(a) Start attending the section you would like to get into on the first day of class. You will receive a Proof of Attendance form which must be signed by your instructor every day. You must attend a class every day, but it does not need to be the same section. All students must take action at CRISP to make sure their official schedule of courses matches the courses they are taking.

(b) On Wednesday, January 13 at 7:00 p.m., there will be a meeting in the basement of the MLB, rooms to be announced later, for each of the above courses. At these meetings, students will be assigned to remaining vacated spaces in the most fair and equitable manner possible, using a lottery system. At no time, however, will any class be allowed to exceed 25 students. Students must bring their CRISP Official Printout of Classes and the Proof of Attendance form to the meeting!

3. Please note that you will not be allowed to change sections at the French meetings. Beginning Thursday, January 14, Elementary French Language Supervisors will hear requests for section changes and fill those requests to whatever degree is possible.

4. Please ensure when adding with the override that you also add modifiers for pass/fail, etc.

Courses in French (Division 371)

101. Elementary French. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded. Students with any prior study of French should NOT enroll in these sections. Cost:3:WL:4

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. French 102 may be followed by 231. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. (4). (LR).

See French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H.Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course. Cost:1; Same texts as 101 WL:See statement above.

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

The objectives and methods of instruction are identical to those of French 101/102. The course moves at a rapid pace, most of the material presented in French 101/102. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework is similar to French 101 and 102, although daily amount is up to 60 percent more than either French 101 or 102 because of the rapid pace. Examinations are similar to 101/102, and the final examination is identical to that of French 102.

231. Second-Year French. French 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 are the third and fourth terms of language study offered. It presents a comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on topics of interest, to understand conversations on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, written exercises, and laboratory work both audio and video. There are comprehensive coursewide tests as well as the midterm and final examinations. Cost:3 WL:See statement above. (Mellor)

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

In French 232, students will continue learning and reviewing vocabulary and grammar from the second half of the book Ensuite. There will be short weekly readings (advertisements, literary excerpts, and short stories) and by the middle of the term, students will begin reading a full-length French novel!! (They will read the majority of the novel on their own and take a reading comprehension test at the end of the term). Throughout the term, students will listen to French songs, see several videos (from French television) as well as two French movies. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. In addition to the outside reading test, there will be 3 course wide tests, a midterm, and a final examination.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of these courses does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement.

112. Second Special Reading Course. French 111 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

This course is designed to increase the reading proficiency gained in French 111. It begins with an intensive and comprehensive review of grammar and idioms, followed by special work for sight-reading. Toward mid-term students select several articles or a book in their field of specialization for outside reading, and they complete their reading on their own with frequent consultation with the instructor. Classes meet in sections of 25 students. They meet four times per week. There are weekly quizzes, course-wide midterm and final examinations. Cost:2 WL:4 (Hagiwara)

Other Language Courses

306. Practical French. French 232 or equivalent. French 306 may be elected prior to French 305. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 306 is a minicourse for students who would like to keep up with their French in an informal atmosphere. It is organized like French 206, but cultural and intellectual readings, as well as audio, written or video materials, provide topics of conversation. The amount of homework is minimal. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 18-24 students. There are no examinations, but homework, attendance, and participation in classroom activities determine the Credit/No Credit grades. Cost:2 WL:4 (Hagiwara)

350. Independent Study. French 232 or the equivalent and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT) May be elected for a total of six hours credit.

French 350 is an Independent Study course which may be offered to undergraduate students who demonstrate the need to study some specific language aspect of French, phonetics (in this case it must not correspond in any way to French 325), grammar, style and translation included. The course may be elected for up to 6 hours of credit, but that option should be exceptional. Generally 3 credits are granted if the course work is as intensive as any regular course at the 300 level. The type of requirement for the final grade must be specifically indicated: examination or other. In all cases the student petitioning for independent student 350 and the supporting instructor must demonstrate that the course is needed and that no other regular course may be taken as a substitute.

361. Intermediate French. French 232 or equivalent. (3; 2-4 in half-term). (Excl).

The purpose of this course is to help students improve their proficiency in the spoken language and in their writing skills through varied activities. French grammar is reviewed; however, this is not a grammar class. The reading excerpts are taken from contemporary works by authors from different French-speaking countries. In the second half of the term, students will read and work on a full-length novel. Students will also watch and work on two contemporary French movies. Videos from recent French news programs will be used for discussion once a week or so. ACTIVE PARTICIPATION is expected of all students and is part of the final grade. All classes are taught in French. Bi-monthly essays, two in-class exams, and one final examination. (Belloni)

362. Advanced French. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

French 362 is neither a literature nor a grammar class. It is designed as a bridge between the highly structured activities of language courses and the more independent work required in literature and civilization courses. French 362 has two main objectives: 1) to help students improve their written and oral fluency; 2) to familiarize students with the linguistic and analytic tools necessary to approach a document, whether a literary text, a newspaper article, a video document, or a movie. Used as the basis of round-table discussions and written exercises, these documents will help students increase their ability to write and converse fluently on different themes presented in class. Active classroom participation is essential, and is part of the final grade. All classes are taught in French. Bi-monthly essays, 2 in-class exams, one final examination. WL:4 (Belloni)

363. French Phonetics. French 361 and 362, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course, conducted in French, is designed to introduce basic concepts in phonetic theory and to help students improve their pronunciation of French through (1) study of the physical characteristics of individual sounds, the relationship between sounds and their written representations, the rules governing pronunciation of "standard" French, and (2) intensive oral practice in the production of French consonants and vowels, syllabification, intonation, liaison, and deletion/retention of the "mute E." During the first week, students will record a speech sample and will be informed of problem areas to work on independently using audiotapes. Homework for each class consists of reading theory, writing phonetic transcriptions, and oral practice with tapes. Participation, 1-2 oral quizzes, and the final oral exam will evaluate proficiency in pronunciation. Homework, quizzes, a midterm, and a written final exam will evaluate ability to use the phonetic alphabet and knowledge of basic theory. Cost:2 WL:1 (Neu)

370/RC Core 370. Advanced Proficiency in French. RC Core 320, or French 362, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

See RC Core 370. (Carduner)

371. Writing French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

The main objective of the course is to develop the skills necessary to writing correct, fluent French. In order to achieve it we will work on three levels: (a) development and reinforcement of correct grammar through presentation of specific syntactic problems, practice exercises, and individual diagnosis of students' writing; (b) development of vocabulary (elimination of faux-amis, finding "le mot juste"); (c) development of quality in composition from imitation to creation (learning how to organize an essay and how to write in tight sparse prose). Students are expected to write frequent essays. In the second half of the semester, each student will work on his/her own short story, with the help of his/her work partners. Final course grade will reflect the students' progress, and participation in class. This course is elected primarily but not exclusively by students concentrating in French. (Gabrielli)

411. Advanced Translation, English-French. French 372 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course will concentrate on developing the students' advanced translating skills. Working mainly from English texts to be translated into French, it will use the practice of translation as applied to a variety of different styles with the goal of increasing the students' knowledge and command of syntactic and stylistic potentialities of the two languages. In the second half of the term, students will be asked to work on individual projects for which they will choose an extract from a contemporary English narrative text. Projects will be discussed in class and individually. Grading is based on participation, day-to-day preparation, homework, the individual project and in-class assignments. (Belloni)

425/Rom. Ling. 480. Background of Modern French. Good reading knowledge of French. (3). (Excl).

This course traces chronologically the salient points in the history of the French language from a structural sketch of Latin, through the radical grammatical reorganization of Old French, to the simplifications of Middle French in the mid-16th century. Textbook: Peter Richard, A History of the French Language. 2nd ed. Routledge, Chapman and Hall, NYC. Course pack of sample texts. Midterm exam, final term paper. Lectures and discussion. Cost:1 WL:3 (Leonard)

427/Rom. Ling. 454. French Syntax. Permission of advisor. (3). (Excl).

This course combines an introduction to linguistics and an indepth review of French syntax. We will explore the basic concepts of modern linguistic theories, including discourse analysis, and see how they are applied to French. We will also compare typical linguistic approaches to language analysis with traditional grammar rules. From this analysis of French we will proceed to exercises designed to increase your competence in grammar and awareness of French stylistics. These exercises involve comparisons of French and English, various sentence recombinations, analyses of sentence structures from simple to complex patterns, including literary and conversational passages, a study of the relationship between word order and the "highlighting" devices and rhythmic patterns of French, correction of grammatical errors made in speech and compositions by French lycee students as well as American students learning French, and translations from English to French. The course will be conducted in French, and the classroom work will consist of lectures and readings (60%) and travaux pratiques (exercises) and three one-hour take home examinations. (Cost:2; WL:4) (Hagiwara)

Civilization

385. Contemporary France: Politics, Culture and Society. French 361. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

France is going through a period of profound changes. New definitions of authority are emerging, new social, political and cultural patterns are becoming visible. The political transformations revealed by the national elections in 1988 result from deep structural changes in the social, economic and cultural areas. The working class has been disorganized by the immigration of foreign workers and even more by the development of automation. A cultural revolution caused by the rapid growth of secondary and higher education, and by the sexual liberation of the late seventies, has erased the influence of traditional catholic values which were still dominant two decades ago. The course will describe and analyze this evolution. It will examine the demographic trends, the political system, the social organization, the educational establishment and the cultural values as well as the daily life of the French citizens (how they eat, work, play, etc....). The problem of the foreign population and its impact on the concept of a "French identity" will be discussed in depth. Finally the challenge of a unified European economy by 1993 will be considered. The course is conducted in French. Lectures and discussions. Course pack. Four written papers. One final exam. (Gabrielli)

Literature

386/387/388/389 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE. The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.

386/MARC 386. Introduction to French Literature (Beginnings to 1600). French 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

An introduction to methods of literary study through the discussion of selected works of the medieval and Renaissance period. We will examine the significance of formal characteristics of literary works (narrative, theater, and lyric poetry), and develop techniques of analysis suited to each type. We will also explore the relationship between literary form and social context. What prompted the creation of a new vernacular literature where none existed before? How does this literature use themes and symbols to create a portrait of society and its structures? Intended for students of French culture and literature; taught in French. No previous study of literature or of medieval and Renaissance history is required. Readings in modern French, include the following: Marie de France, Lais; lyric poetry of the troubadours; Beroul, Le roman de Tristan et Iseut; La Farce de maitre Pierre Pathelin; and a selection of Renaissance poetry. Required work: 4 short papers (3 pages), mid-term and final examination. Cost:3 WL:1 (Graham)

388. Introduction to French Literature (1800 to 1900). French 232. (3). (HU).

This course will focus on five of the most important writers of 19th century French literature, namely Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Zola and Maupassant. Emphasis will be placed on the literary aspects of the works read as well as the historical, political and artistic context of the day. A typical assignment will consist of reading some twenty pages of a given work and preparing to discuss them in class. Students will write four papers in French (three or four pages in length). Each paper will be corrected for grammar, choice of expression and content. The course grade will be based on the results of written work and on classroom participation. Regular attendance is required. There is no final examination. The course is conducted in French. Cost:2 WL:4 (Gray)

389. Introduction to French Literature (1900 to present). French 232. (3). (HU).

The course will deal with the novel and the poetry, first of the generation born around 1870 (with the titles of Gide, Colette, Proust and Valéry) and then of the last twenty years (with two short novels by Modiano and Wittig respectively, and poems by Guillevic and Char). Two short papers and a term paper will be required. (Muller)

440. Le cinéma français. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course will have three goals: an understanding of the history of French cinema from its beginnings to the present; an investigation of the semiotics of film; and a cross-cultural analysis of French film in relation to Hollywood and American film production as the dominant presence on the world market. To accomplish these goals we will view (on video and usually during the longer Tuesday session) approximately one film per week. These will include works by Lumiere, Melies, Renoir, Duvivier, Leconte, Bunuel, Resnais, Varda, Truffaut, Godard, Corbiau, Besson and Hubert. We will also read texts both on individual films and on more general questions of film history and semiotics. The course will consist of class discussions and occasional lectures so as to encourage collaborative work and active class participation, students will be divided into research groups with one group responsible for preparing discussion subjects and strategies for each of the films to be studied. The class will be conducted in English and all films will be subtitled. French concentrators are encouraged to do their written work in French. Requirements; active class participation, two short papers, a mid-term and final exam. Cost:2 WL:1 (Kavanagh)

450. Independent Studies. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the French Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

453. Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The history of dramatic literature numbers four great creative periods: the fifth century B.C. in Greece, the Elizabethan age in England, the Golden Age in Spain, and the 17th century in France. This had the particular distinction of establishing in both tragedy and comedy a tradition which was to determine the subsequent development of European drama. This course will focus on the works of the three most important and seminal dramatists of the time, the tragedies of Corneille and Racine and the comedies of Molière, first of all as literary texts, but also in relation to the social and political context of 17th century France. Grades will be based on class room participation (regular attendance is required), and on three papers (5-8 pages each) on assigned topics. The course will be conducted in French. (Gray)

456. Symbolism. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

"To say that literature has its own language, one which does not coincide with its natural language but is superimposed on that language, is merely another way of saying that literature possesses an exclusive, inherent system of signs and rules governing their combination which serve to transmit special messages, nontransmittable by other means." (Jurij Lotman). The course attempts to uncover the "signs" and "rules" of the more-than-denotative language of symbolism. The exploration takes place almost entirely in poetry; after brief reference to Baudelaire as precursor to French symbolism, the class undertakes analysis of poems by Rimbaud, Verlaine, Mallarmé, and Valéry (with a short excursion into the poems of Laforgue and, if time permits, into some symbols in prose). In four or five short papers (original analyses of poetic texts) students have the opportunity to sharpen their analytical skills. Readings, lectures, and discussions are in French. Final examination. Cost:2 WL 3/4 (Nelson)

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (LR).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with parallel emphasis on conversation. Text, workbook and lab manual required; Italian 101 covers the first half of the text. Course topics include (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and their position. Methods of instruction include (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm, and a final examination.Cost:2 WL:4

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden the student's knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also emphasized. The course covers the second half of the text with workbook and lab manual; readings supplements this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Cost:3 WL:4

206. Conversation for Non-concentrators. Italian 102 or equivalent. Italian 206 may be elected prior to Italian 205. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Italian 206 emphasizes fluency and self-expression in conversational Italian. This course is for students who have had at least two (2) terms of Italian and are interested in acquiring a certain facility with the spoken language. Class work consists of reading material from various sources (magazines, newspapers, short storied, etc) which will be discussed in class. Use of the language laboratory will provide additional conversational material on various aspects of Italian life. Class will meet twice a week. There are no examinations, and the grading is on a credit basis only. Success in the course is determined on the basis of attendance, homework and participation in classroom activities.

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions and oral reports center on readings or current events, as well as on videos. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. Cost:1 WL:4

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112. (4). (LR).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian, including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. There is a continuing review of grammar, and the elements of composition. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. Cost:1 WL:4

Other Language and Literature Courses

360. Italian Culture and History, Eighteenth to Twentieth Centuries. (3). (HU).

This course, treating the 18th century through the 20th century, emphasizes the political, social and cultural difficulties that Italy encountered once it had lost the privileged position it held in Europe during the Renaissance. The importance of European movements, such as Illuminism and Romanticism, will be stressed as both artistic and political manifestations. Particular attention will be given to the mid-19th century struggle for the unification of the country, and the conditions that allowed the Fascist takeover. The Fascist period will be analyzed, considering in particular Mussolini's control over the mass-media, his promotion to the movie industry and the position of the intellectuals toward the dictatorship. The achievements of Italy after the second World War will be the focus of the last part of the course. Selected works by the following authors will be read: Vico, Verri, Beccaria, Goldini, Parini, Alfieri, Foscolo, Mazzini, Manzoni, Leopardi, Carducci, Verga, and early 20th-century figures. Students will be required to write two or three short papers during the term. Cost:3 WL:4 (Frisch)

362. Advanced Italian. Italian 361 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Further proficiency in oral and writing skills will be stressed in Italian 362. Reading materials will include short fiction and non-fiction, as well as lengthier assignments of outside reading on which various written and oral assignments will be made. Participation in class discussion, occasional oral presentations, weekly compositions based for the most part on assigned readings, the subject matter of which will deal primarily with subjects of topical interest. Continuing grammar difficulties will be treated as they arise. The course will be conducted in Italian and will meet three hours weekly.

380. Italian Cinema and Society. A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU).

The course, which will be taught in English, traces the historical development of Italian cinema from the postwar advent of neorealism to the mid 1980's. The course has several aims: to understand the political, economic, and cultural contexts which generated and supported the neorealist movement; to explore and analyze the theoretical bases of neorealism and its reception, both friendly and hostile, in Italian intellectual/political circles; to examine various aspects of the movement beyond neorealism proper in films of the 1950's and 1960's by Fellini, Visconti, Antonioni, Olmi, Bertolucci, and Bellocchio; and to expose the rethinking and reevaluation of the neorealist aesthetic as carried out by Brusati, Scola, and the Taviani Brothers in the 1970's and 1980's. The course requirements, beyond class participation, will be three 6-8 page papers. A knowledge of Italian is useful, but is not required. A lab fee will be charged. Cost:2 WL:4 (Frisch)

468. Studies in Modern Italian Literature. Reading knowledge of Italian. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.
Sex, Love and Death in the Modern Italian Novel.
How have some of modern Italy's finest authors dealt with questions of sex, love and death in their writings? In this course we will examine this and other questions with reference to five great Italian novels written in this century: The Confessions of Zeno by Italo Svevo, With Closed Eyes by Federigo Tozzi, The Time of Indifference by Alberto Moravia, That Awful Mess on Via Merulana by Carlo Emilio Gadda, and If on a Winter's Night a Traveler by Italo Calvino. Readings and discussion will be in English, though students competent in Italian will be encouraged to read works in the original. Requirements: one class presentation, and three 5-7 pp. papers. Cost:2 (Moe)

475. Dante. Italian 232 or equivalent. (2). (HU).
Divina Commedia.
This is a mini-course in the study of Dante's Divina Commedia taught by visiting professors. The course will concentrate on the Commedia's first two canticles (the "Inferno" and the "Purgatorio"). Course meetings will be divided into two groups of core lessons taught by visitors from Italy (one group on the "Inferno" and one on the "Purgatorio"), and there will also be three public lectures given by distinguished American Italianists. Whereas the core lessons will be in Italian, the public lectures will be in English, with references to Dante's text either in Italian or in English translation at the choice of the speaker. Knowledge of Italian is necessary for this course, though Dante's work may be read in English if the student so chooses. There will be a total of 26 contact hours for two credits. WL:3 (Moe)

481. Boccaccio, Bandello, and the Novella. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).
Critical Perspectives on Boccaccio's Decameron
One of the great works of medieval European literature, Boccacio's Decameron is also strikingly modern, and offers a panoramic portrayal of medieval Italian society that is of great interest to the contemporary reader. In this course we will read the Decameron in the context of medieval society and culture, looking at the different "sides" of Boccaccio's work and world: the bawdy, the heroic, the subversive, the conservative, the multi-cultural. We will also examine such questions as: what different roles do men and women play in Boccaccio's world? In what sense is the Decameron the poetic expression of a society in transition? Readings and discussion will be in English, though students competent in Italian will be encouraged to read works in the original language. There will also be a film viewing of Pasolini's Decameron. Requirements: one class presentation, two 4-6 pp. papers, and a final 8-10 pp. paper. Cost:2 (Moe)

Courses in Portuguese (Division 452)

102. Elementary Portuguese. Portuguese 101. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to give students the ability to understand the Portuguese of everyday life, to be understood in typical situations of everyday life, and to read non-technical Portuguese of moderate difficulty. Portuguese 102 covers units 12 to 18 of the textbook FALANDO, LENDO, ESCREVENDO PORTUGUES (Lima and Iunes). Class room work involves gradual introduction of Portuguese structures through dialogues and communication exercises which stress listening and speaking. Homework consists of studying grammar, memorizing structures and verb forms, writing exercises ranging from meaningful sentences to compositions. Grading will be based on six quizzes, two tests, and class participation. The instructor's office provides some audio-visual material (videos, newspapers, magazines, etc.), and other material is available at the Language Lab and at the Graduate Library Hatcher. Portuguese 102 is offered only in the Winter Term. Cost:2 WL:4 (Viviani)

232. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 231 or the equivalent. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to give students the ability to understand the Portuguese of everyday life when spoken at a moderate speed, to be understood in typical situations of everyday life, and to read non-technical Portuguese of moderate difficulty. Because of the nature of the materials and the nationality and training of the present staff, students will learn the variety of Portuguese spoken in Brazil by educated speakers. Classroom work involves gradual introduction of Portuguese structure through dialogues and communication exercises which stress listening and speaking. Homework consists of studying grammar, memorizing structures and verb forms and writing exercises. Grading will be based on six hourly quizzes (two partial exams), oral exercises, homework, class participation and attendance. Cost:2 WL:4 (Viviani)

350. Independent Study. Portuguese 232 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of six credits.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed must be submitted to the concentration advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Portuguese Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

414(481)/Spanish 414. Background of Modern Spanish. Good reading knowledge of Spanish. (3). (Excl).

See Spanish 414. (Dworkin)

454/French 427. French Syntax. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

See French 427. (Hagiwara)

480/French 425. Background of Modern French. A thorough reading knowledge of French. (3). (Excl).

See French 425. (Leonard)

Courses in SPANISH (DIVISION 484)

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (LR).

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish, this course provides a basic introduction to Spanish grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis placed on developing functional, communicative language skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and writing Spanish. Grade based on four departmental tests, final exam, written work and daily oral work. (Spanish 101 and 102 are the equivalent of Spanish 103.)

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. (4). (LR).

A continuation of Spanish 101; composition and reading skills given more practice. Grade based on departmental exams, oral exams, other examinations, quizzes, written assignments (including several compositions) and daily oral work. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. Cost: Same texts as 101. WL:4.

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

A refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. It prepares students for Spanish 231. Transfer students should elect Spanish 102 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed 102.

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills of students; to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to build vocabulary; and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade based on a series of quizzes and exams designed to assess ability to read, write and understand Spanish plus oral class participation and written work. (Hilberry)

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, history, culture, outlooks, and habits of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade is based on exams, designed to assess ability to speak, understand, read and write Spanish, plus periodic written work (including compositions) and oral class participation. WL:4 (Milne)

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

112. Second Special Reading Course. Spanish 111 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Spanish 112 is the second of a two-course sequence in which students learn the art of Spanish translating. Students enrolling in Spanish 112 should already know the major Spanish verb tenses and should come to the course with a fundamental knowledge of Spanish grammar. In Spanish 112 students read a number of texts from a broad spectrum of academic and nonacademic disciplines, including biology, anthropology, archaeology, history, the culinary arts, and many other areas of human interest. As language recognition is the principal skill acquired in Spanish 112, the course does not stress speaking. (Milne)

Other Language Courses

358. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators. Spanish 232 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 361 or 362. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 358 is a text-based conversation course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary and listening skills. Class format includes open and group discussions, debates, oral presentations and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as newspaper articles, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade. (Pollard)

361. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or equivalent. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3; 2-4 in the half-term). (Excl).

Spanish 361 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare translations and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions or presentations. (Pollard)

362. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or equivalent. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 362 is intended to improve student's ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions or presentations. (Pollard)

414(481)/Rom. Ling. 414. Background of Modern Spanish. A thorough reading knowledge of Spanish. (3). (Excl).

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, and the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard. The ability to read Spanish is essential. Selected chapters from Rafael Lapesa, Historia de la lengua espanola and Antonio Alatorre, Los 1,001 anos de la lengua espanola will be made available in a course pack. In addition, graduate students will be required to read the chapters dealing with Spain in Roger Wright, Late Latin and Early Romance. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of Spanish. Cost:1 WL:3 (Dworkin)

Literature

350. Independent Studies. Permission of concentration adviser. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once with permission.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

371. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

A study of Spanish literature in the Medieval and Golden Age periods (1000-1700). Students will read several texts of Spanish literature including poetry, narrative, and theater. The discussions will center around a broad cultural background including moral and political themes as well as formal aspects of the texts. There will be one short report to be given orally in class, two 3-4 page papers in Spanish on the texts, and one final exam consisting of essay questions on readings. Students will be evaluated on the basis of papers, exams and class discussion. Methods: lecture-discussion. WL:4 (Casa)

372. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

The late eighteenth-century and the 1930's mark the two extremes of the period represented in this survey of modern Spanish literature. The course will thus lay a good historical foundation for further Spanish courses and for comparisons to readings from other literatures. Essays, plays, poems and novels are analyzed as individual works for the beginning student, methods and approaches of literary criticism are considered, and an effort is made to show how the works exemplify their cultural context ranging from the Enlightenment through Romanticism, Positivism, Symbolism to Existentialism. Representative authors who may be studied are Moratin, Larra, Becquer, Galdos, Azorin, Machado, Jimenez, Unamuno and Lorca. The class format is basically recitation, but lectures and reports will also be used. Exercises consist of periodic tests, midterm and final paper, and a final exam. The course is conducted in Spanish. Cost:3 WL:4 (Anderson)

373. Topics in Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001.
This class will introduce participants to the reading of literature in Spanish through exploration of the ways in which a selection of texts represent the centers and the edges of cultures. We will ultimately be concerned with imaginative fiction's powers to establish, fortify, and stretch the cultural boundaries between insider and outsider, between what is allowed and what is forbidden. This is a complicated problem, but despite (and perhaps because of its complication, it offers an appropriate point of entry into the pleasures and powers of imaginative reading and writing. Readings will provide a basic overview of literary forms (epic, lyric, essay, novel, short story); they will include the anonymous Poema del Cid and works by Almodóvar, Carpentier, García, Lorca, Martín Gaite, and Rodoreda. Conducted in Spanish. Midterm and final papers, midterm and final exams, course journal and other short written assignments. Prerequisites: Spanish 361-362 or equivalent. Cost:3 WL:4 (Brown)

Section 002. Relaciones entre la historia de la literatura espanola y su Historia del Arte: Tres momentos y un problem: 1. La pintura del Greco y la literatura mistica espanola. 2. Velazquez y el barroco espanol: Textos de Cervantes, Quevedo y Gongora. 3. Goya y las fuentes del Costubrismo espanol. 4. La mujer a traves de la pintura espanola en esos tres momentos. Habra lecturas y proyecciones de diapositivas en la class. Se completara con una visita al Museo de Arte de Detroit. El examen final constara de: el comentario de un texto literario y el analisis de una pintura. El alumno debe ralizar una investigacion sobre cualquiera de los cuatro puntos mencionados. WL:3 (Lopez-Grigera)

382. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

This course will explore some of the canonical texts of twentieth century Latin American fiction, poetry, drama, and essay. The texts will be studied in their literary, cultural, and social dimensions. Lectures and discussions, as well as student writing, will be in Spanish. Evaluated on the basis of several very short papers (1-3 pages) and one final term paper of 10 to 15 pages. Cost:4 WL:4 (Colás)

400(432). Spanish and Latin American Literature in Translation. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. Open to students at all levels. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (Excl).

This course will explore modern and contemporary Latin American Fiction (including the so-called "boom," its precursors, and its successors) with an emphasis on its social dimensions. These will be addressed by looking at how texts treat through their use of language, form, style, and Latin American history - such issues as authority, exile, violence, gender, sex, race, and sexuality. We will also see how these texts confront questions of the native and the foreign, the popular, the role of culture and the writer in society, and the search for identity. Authors studied will include some of the following: Gabriel García Márquez, Manuel Puig, Rigoberta Menchú, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Luis Borges, Isabel Allende, Julio Cortázar, Cristina Peri Rossi, Clarice Lispector, and Tomás Eloy Martínez. Method of instruction determined by enrollment. Student evaluation based on papers. Cost:4 WL:4 Colás

435(450). Independent Study. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 3 credits.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professorguidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

445(495). Romance Studies: Introduction to French-Spanish Literary Relations. A reading knowledge of French and Spanish. (3). (Excl).

The cultural world of the Western European Middle Ages was not limited by boundaries of nationality and language as, for example, are modern academic literature departments. Political borders were unstable, and exchange across and through them was fluid. This class will crisscross one of those modern borders, the Pyrenees, exploring parallel Spanish and French manifestations of some of the most important literary genres of the European Middle Ages epic, lyric, hagiography, and courtly romance. A list of readings will be posted on the professor's door in November. So far as possible, texts will be read in the original languages, though arrangements will be made for students with reading knowledge of only Spanish or only French. Taught in English. Midterm and final papers, midterm and final exams, course journal and other short written assignments. Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of Spanish or French required; reading knowledge of both preferred. Cost:3 WL:4 (Brown)

458(482). The Spanish Picaresque Novel. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

En el Siglo de Oro, Espana produjo un genero narrativo: la Novela Picaresca, que ejercio posteriormente gran influjo en el resto de Europa y en America. El curso estara dedicado a algunas obras fundamentales de este genero: Lazarillo de Tormes, Framentos del Guzman de Alfarache de Mateo Aleman, El Buscon de Quevado, Rinconete y Cortadillo de Cervantes y Teresa de Manzanares de Castillo Solorzano. Se estudiaran algunos de los ecos de este genero en America y en Europa. Tambien se veran las relaciones de la Picaresca con la pintura y el teatro de la epoca. Habra un examen final y un trabajo de investigación. WL:3 (Lopez Grigera)

459(485). Don Quijote. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (HU).
Don Quijote
es la cumbre de la literatura espanola y una de las mas importantes de la literatura universal. En ella estan presentes tanto los problemas e ideales y problemas de la epoca de su autor como los de todos los tiempos. La lectura del Quijote es un ejercicio de la mas alta calidad, reconfortante al mismo tiempo que produce una excepcional emocion estetica. El curso tiene como objeto que el estudiante haga una introduccion a la obra que le permita disfrutar de los mundos ideologicos de retorico del Quijote y de la invencion artistica de Cervantes. El estudiante debe leer detenidamente la obra y hacer dos trabajo sobre un tema especifico, segun la methodologia que el professor require. WL:4 (Casa)

475(488). Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.
Curso De Pregrado Sobre Manuel Puig,
Lectura de cuatro novelas de Puig (La traición de Rita Hayworth, Boquitas Pintadas, De Buenos Aires Affair, El beso de la mujer arana), destinada a mostrar la presencia en ella de componentes diferenciales, especificamente latinoamericanos. Especial énfasis se pondrá en la presencis de los medios de masas (cine, radio, revistas) en esas cuatro obras, destancando en cada caso los elementos regionales (argentinos, latinamericanos) legibles en esa presencia. (Guzman)

491. Senior Honors Course. Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Students who successfully complete the Junior year Honors sequence are eligible to elect the senior year sequence (Spanish 490 and 491). In Spanish 491 the focus is upon selected topics, authors, literary movements, or genres chosen from Spain or Spanish America depending on the needs of the student. The student will study and analyze the subject, supervised by a senior member of the faculty. A description of the project and required exercises to be completed must be submitted to the Honors Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Honors Committee. The committee is to receive any lengthy paper submitted in the course. Prerequisite: Open only to seniors by permission of the Departmental Honors Committee.


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