Courses in THEATRE AND DRAMA (DIVISION 695)

101. Introduction to Acting 1. Permission of instructor (brief interview). (3). (Excl).

This course is designed as a general introduction to the fundamental skills of acting in the theatre. It involves discussion and practical work, including theatre games, warm-up, monologue, and scene work. Some papers and selected reading. Brief, informal interviews are required for admission to all sections. Further details at Theatre Office, Room 2550, Frieze Building. Cost:1

222/CAAS 341. Introduction to Black Theatre. (3). (HU).

This course will cover the origins, development and current trends in Black Theatre. It will focus on the basic concepts, creations, methods of operation, and artistic contributions of Black Americans to the theatre of Western Civilization and the theatre of Black America. It will also include an in-depth study of the significance and results connected with the selected deletion of the Black American contribution to the development of American theatre and drama. Representative plays from the Black theatre will be explored through lectures, discussions and interpretive readings. Participation in class and attendance are mandatory as are assignments such as viewing campus theatre productions and other productions in the Ann Arbor area. A written essay, four quizzes, a midterm and final examination will also be given in partial fulfillment of the course requirements. Text: The Theatre of Black Americans, ed. by Errol Hill. Cost:1 WL:2,4 (Jackson)

233/CAAS 342. Acting and the Black Experience. Permission of instructor (brief interview). (3). (HU).

This course is designed as an introduction to the fundamental skills of acting in the theatre, with special emphasis on the presentation of drama from a Black perspective. Course content involves discussion and practical work, including theater games, improvisation, development of warm-up exercises, monologue, and scene work. All dramatic texts used for monologues and scene study will come from the works of representative Black playwrights. Some papers and selected reading, a midterm and final examination are required. A brief, informal interview is required for admission to this course. Further details at Theatre Office, Room 2550, Frieze Building. Text: Acting One, by Robert Cohen. Cost:1 WL:2,4 (Jackson)

237. Acting II. Theatre 236 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Step two of acting definition within the Theatre Department's sequence of acting classes. Some papers and selected reading. "On feet" work with particular emphasis on the spoken word, getting the text off the page. Theatre 236 and/or permission of the instructor. Cost:2 WL:3 (Gwillim)

245(345). Introduction to Stage Management. Theatre 250, or permission of instructor. (2). (Excl).

Class covers methods of stage management including rehearsal coordination, prompt book preparation, record keeping, and director, cast, and crew relationships during the rehearsal period. Students will be assigned as Assistant Stage Manager on a School of Music production (theatre, opera, musical theatre) requiring, during the rehearsal/performance period, approximately 70 hrs. outside of class time. Evaluation is based on class participation, occasional written assignments, and execution of assigned stage management duties. (Finley)

250. Introduction to Technical Theatre Practices. (3). (Excl).

This class is s survey of all aspects of theatre production. Scenery construction, rigging and painting, stage lighting, costume construction, and stage makeup are among topics investigated. Students also work in University Productions in the lab portion of the class. Cost:2 WL:4 (Decker)

251. Production Practicum 1. (1). (Excl).
Theatre Practicum.
Students enrolled in this class perform duties as stage scenery, lighting, sound, wardrobe, or stage properties crews for School of Music Theatre, Dance, Opera, and Musical Theatre Productions. No previous experience required. No Text. WL:4. Assignment meeting 5:00 PM Sept. 17 in the Trueblood Theatre. (Decker)

252. Production Practicum 2. Theatre 251 and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

Exploration of principles of theatre crafts and practices under faculty supervision.

262. Production Practicum 4. Theatre 261 or permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

Exploration of principles of theatre crafts and practices under faculty supervison.

322/English 444. History of Theatre II. (3). (HU).

A survey of the development of Western Theatre from the end of the 17th century to the mid-20th century. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and societal context. Representative plays are also studied. The course method is a combination of lecture and discussion. Four quizzes, final, one research paper. Texts include HISTORY OF THE THEATRE (Oscar Brockett) and MASTERPIECES OF THE DRAMA (Allison, Carr, and Eastman). Cost:4 WL:3 (Woods)

345. Stage Management Practicum: Plays. Theatre 250 and permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 4 credits.
Plays.
Seminar class covers methods of stage management including rehearsal coordination, prompt book preparation, record keeping, and director, cast, and crew relationships during the rehearsal period. Students will be assigned as Stage Manager on a Theatre Department production requiring, during the rehearsal/performance period, approximately 170 hrs. outside of class time. Evaluation is based on execution of assigned stage management duties. WL:3 (Finley)

351. Production Practicum 5. Theatre 261 and 262, or permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl).

Exploration of principles of theatre crafts and practices under faculty supervision.

352. Production Practicum 6. Theatre 351. (1-3). (Excl).

Exploration of principles of theatre crafts and practices under faculty supervision.

356. Introduction to Lighting for the Stage. Theatre 250 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

An introduction to the theory and practice of lighting design for the stage. Topics to be covered include technical information of lighting equipment, methods of lighting, development of design concept and application, drafting and design paperwork, color, and script analysis. Course grade will be based on design projects and written analyses of plays. Course work will include three design projects as well as participation on the light crew for a University Productions show. Instructional methods will include lecture, discussion and practical application. Cost:1 WL:3 (Tan)

370(470). Costume Design I. Theatre 260 or permission of instructor. (3) . (Excl).

A beginning course in the process of designing costumes for the stage. The course will cover character analysis and color focus, design rendering in various media, use of design elements to communicate concept. Grade based on design project. (Crow)

386. Practicum in Performing Arts Management. Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl).

Students will gain practical experience in arts administration by assisting in the creation of approximately five productions per term presented under the auspices of the School of Music, including drama, dance, musical theatre, and opera. Students are required to meet "real world" deadlines and to contribute toward meeting actual ticket-sales goals. Administrative assignments include: writing press releases, developing marketing campaigns, creating print and radio ads, assisting in ticket-office operations, managing the house during performances, and analyzing budgets. One and one-half hour class per week is required plus weekly duties according to the particular production. Theatre 385 is a suggested prerequisite (or concurrently), or previous backstage experience. Students who are interested in all types of performing arts are welcome. Cost:2 WL:3 (Kuras)

399. Topics in Drama. (1-3). (Excl).

Theatre Symposium. Theatre symposium is essentially a largely informal discussion group that examines a broad range of issues and topics in the theatre. The issues and topics are most often the choices of the students. There will be no papers assigned or an exam; however, each student will be asked to make an informal class presentation around at least one of the topics during the term. Class participation is imperative. The effort shall be to examine issues, not resolve them. No topic or issue relating to the theatre is taboo. (OyamO)

402. Ideas of Theatre: Dramatic Theory and Criticism. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

The course will consist of a selection of major texts in dramatic and theatrical theory, structured along broad lines (e.g., classical-romantic-modern), through which students will gain an acquaintance with the dominant historical ideas concerning the aesthetic and cultural offices of theatre and drama. The theoretical readings will be augmented by a short list of pertinent plays; these will be part of a departmental "Essential Plays List," and students will be using this course (among others in the department) to move towards completing the reading on this list. (Consultation among all teachers requiring play-reading will head off any possible duplication.) The method of "Ideas of Theatre" will entail rigorous discussion of the readings, and requirements will include a term paper on a particular theorist or critical topic as well as several critical reviews (as opposed to journalistic "notices") of local productions. Cost:3 WL:3 (Cardullo)

420. Playwriting Toward Production. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Playwriting Toward Production is intended as a comprehensive introduction to the collaborative nature of preparing a play for production. Each playwright must have a completed early or 1st draft of a full length or a one act play on which to work. The plays will go through various phases of the collaborative process as if in a genuine production situation. The writer will confer with a director, various design artist and actors. The instructor will act as dramaturg for all the plays. Writers are expected to consider rewriting based upon input from the various collaborators. Cost:2 WL:5. Submit full length play or one act in December, '93. (OyamO)

423/English 449. American Theatre and Drama. (3). (HU).

Through a study of selected plays by American playwrights, organized chronologically, this course will trace the development of an indigenous American drama and theatre. Discussion will begin with the European artistic influences, and will move to the study of the following historical, theatrical, and dramatic issues: the particular elements in the American experience that shaped drama and theatre, including pioneering and territoriality, individualism, social class and ethnicity, urbanization, family and community, race and religion, commercialism and consumerism, war and technology, and politics (sexual and otherwise); the development of Broadway as a center for commercial theatre and the consequent development first of "little" or independent theatres between 1912 and 1920, then of regional threatres in the 1960s; Off- and Off-Off-Broadway; the establishment of major companies and institutions such as the Federal Theatre Project, the Group theatre, and the Actors' Studio; and the growth of an American avant-garde. Midterm and final exams, 2 papers and class participation required. Cost:3 WL:3 (Cardullo)

441. Directing I. Theatre 102 or 237, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Director and Text.
For Winter Term, 1994, this course is jointly offered with RC Humanities 482.001 (Mendeloff)

445. Stage Management Practicum: Opera and Musicals. Theatre 245. (2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 4 credits.

Seminar class covers methods of stage management including rehearsal coordination, prompt book preparation, record keeping, and director, cast, and crew relationships during the rehearsal period. Students will be assigned as Stage Manager on a School of Music production (opera or musical theatre) requiring, during the rehearsal/performance period, approximately 170 hrs. outside of class time. Evaluation is based on execution of assigned stage management duties. Cost:3 (Finley)

464. Scene Painting for the Theatre. Theatre 250 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course is a lab course designed to examine and practice the basic techniques of theatrical scene painting. Students in this course will learn, practice and combine skills for layout, color mixing, basic painting techniques and multi media techniques. Suitable clothing and lab fee required. WL:1 (Crabtree)

466. History of Decor. Theatre 260 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

A chronological study of the decorative styles of interiors and exteriors in Western Architecture and its application to the stage. Cost:3 WL:1 (Beudert)

472. Stage Makeup. (2). (Excl). Lab fee ($30) required.

The study by practical application of the materials and processes used in designing and applying theatrical make-up to the face, hands and neck. Instruction through lab/discussion. Evaluation by attendance and participation, in-class applications, compiled reference file, and fulfillment of make-up running crew assignment. Text: Richard Corson, STAGE MAKEUP, 8th ed. Cost:3 WL:1 (Sadler)

495. UBER-Practicum. Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl).

The Uber-Practicum is an advanced course of intensive theatre practice. Students are only permitted to enroll after submitting a written proposal of their work for approval to their BFA advisor. (Beudert)

572. Advanced Make-up Design, Prosthetics, and Wig Ventilation. (3). (Excl).

Prerequisite: 472 or equivalent undergrad experience to be decided by instructor. Text: Richard Corson, STAGE MAKEUP, 8th ed., plus supplemental handouts and reserved info at libraries. Lab fee: $30.00. An in depth study of stylized makeup and hair design, looking at makeup and hair/wigs from various historical periods and at designing for different styles of performance including opera, dance, theatre and musical theatre. This course will be an advanced study of makeup and hair/wig design. A 'HOW TO" look at: (a) talking with Wig Masters/Makeup Artists to achieve desired design, (b) researching makeup/hair styles for various periods and characters, (c) basic care for and styling of synthetic and human hair wigs, (d) basic 3-D prosthetic makeup including casting the face, modeling shapes with clay, and the use of various forms of latex and wax/putty. The rest of the class will be utilized to explore a variety of methods used to create theatrical wigs and facial hair pieces. Basic ventilation techniques will be taught and applied to the construction of eyebrows, mustaches, sideburns, and beards, as well as lace fronted wigs. Crepe hair as well as human and synthetic hair will be used to create facial hair effects. There will be a practical final exam project and the students will be graded on attendance, preparation, participation, and creation and execution of makeup/hair designs. Several guest Artists/Lecturers possible. (Sadler)


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