Germanic Languages and Literatures

Courses in DUTCH (DIVISION 357)

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 512. (4). (LR).

This course, a continuation of 111, proceeds with the basic grammar of the Dutch language. We will primarily use the monolingual text Levend Netherlands (Living Dutch), in which each lesson consists of an everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a comprehensive vocabulary list of one topic, questions about the conversation, discussion and homework. To enliven the class, the teacher will present the students with a variety of texts, music, video, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. Cost:1 WL:3 (Broos)

232. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 231 or the equivalent. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 532. (4). (LR).

This course, a continuation of Dutch 231, will further examine the particular difficulties and subtleties of Dutch grammar and style. Grammatical items introduced in previous courses will be reviewed where necessary. Introduction to contemporary Dutch society by means of songs, video, comics, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course, which will be conducted mostly in Dutch. Cost:1 WL:3 (Broos)

495. Topics in Dutch Literature. Dutch 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course will examine prose and poetry of both the Netherlands and Belgium. Issues like the influence of the Second World War, feminist writing, Dutch Indies Literature are among the many topics that will provide the students with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and point of view of (modern) Dutch literature. The course will be conducted in Dutch. Cost:1 (Broos)

German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100. (4). (LR).

First course of a two-term sequence in elementary German. The first-year program provides a survey of German grammar as the basis for developing the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing everyday German, as well as giving the student some understanding of life in the German-speaking world. Additional time outside of class will be needed for regular written homework assignments, listening to cassette tapes, and viewing occasional video films. There are chapter tests and a comprehensive final exam. Instruction is done in English and German. Cost:2 WL:2

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Second course of a two-term sequence in elementary German. See German 101 for a general description. Cost:2 WL:2

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 102. (4). (LR).

Course designed for students who have had two or more years of high school German or one or more terms of German at a college or university other than the University of Michigan, but are not yet at a second-year level here. There is a quick review of very elementary grammar and vocabulary before moving on to an intense survey of more involved aspects of elementary German. By meeting FIVE times a week we can cover all the material normally covered in two terms of elementary German, providing a solid grammatical basis and practice in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as insight into everyday life in the German-speaking world. Additional time outside of class will be needed for regular written homework assignments and listening to cassettes. There will be four tests and a comprehensive final examination. Students may enroll in German 231 upon satisfactory completion of this course. Instruction is in German and English. Cost:2 WL:2

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of the class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. The course prerequisite is German 111 or a placement examination (CEEB, GSFLT, or departmental). Like German 111, German 112 is open only to graduate students and undergraduates in special programs. Cost:1 WL:4 (Paslick)

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

Third of a four-term sequence in contemporary German. The second-year, or intermediate, program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. There will be an intermediate grammar review and selected readings. There are three hourly tests and a final examination. Students write essays related to class readings. The language of instruction is mostly German. Cost:3 WL:2

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). Some sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss a large variety of texts. There are three hourly tests and a final examination. In addition, students write essays related to class readings. The language of instruction is German. Cost:2 WL:2

325. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The sequence of German 325 and 326 is required for concentration in German. It is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final examinations. Cost:2 WL:2

326. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

See German 325.

382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German dramas of the 19th and 20th centuries. These dramas reflect not only the main literary but also the significant cultural and political trends of the period. In conjunction with German 381, 383, 384, or 385 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of individual plays, but the instructor will include some biographical, literary and historical background. The texts are by Hauptmann, Schnitzler, Kaiser, Brecht, Durrenmatt and Frisch. The major language is German, but not exclusively. A term paper will be assigned. It may be in English. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. Cost:1 WL:2 (Cowen)

385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German short stories and novellas of the twentieth century, from the periods before and between the world wars (Mann and Kafka) to recent prose fiction (Grass). In conjunction with German 381, 382, 383, or 384, this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of the individual works, but some historical and literary background material will be included. The texts read in recent terms were by Kafka, Mann, Musil, Boll, Durrenmatt and Grass. The major language is German, but not exclusively. Two short interpretive papers will be assigned for the term; they may be in English or German. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. Cost:1 WL:4 (Paslick)

426. Intermediate Composition and Conversation. German 325 and 326; or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

In this course various approaches will be used to improve the student's proficiency. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape on the history and culture of the German-speaking countries and to use it as a departure point for an essay. Video cassettes will also be integrated into the course. Each student is expected to give a brief presentation and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on compositions as well as class participation. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425. Cost:1 WL:Call the instructor at 663-9673. (Weiss)

452. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

The course presents a selection of literary masterpieces which have a bearing on our time; plays, a novel (WERTHERS LEIDEN by Goethe) as well as selections of poetry. The assigned readings will be introduced and discussed in class. Concentrators in German are expected to read the texts in the original, non-concentrators have the option to consult a translation. The syllabus will be discussed at the first meeting. There will be a midterm and a final examination. Instructor will speak German, students have the option. Cost:1 WL:4 (Schelle)

454. German Romanticism. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the contributions of romanticism to German literary and cultural history. Attention will also be paid to the social and political conditions of the period. Readings will primarily consist of selected fiction and poetry. Students are expected to have completed at least three years of college level German, or the equivalent. They will be encouraged to participate in class discussions for which there should be ample opportunity. Cost:1 WL:3 (Weiss)

457. Twentieth Century German Fiction. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This seminar concentrates on texts that depict the sociopolitical conditions, the intellectual and ethical predicaments before and after the two World Wars in Germany. The following philosophical and political issues will guide our investigation: (1) the conflicts between the individual and the totalitarian, (2) the aesthetics of war, (3) the relationship between literature and politics, (4) Sprache and Sprachlosigkeit. We will read works by Kafka, Musil, Heinrich and Thomas Mann, Hesse, Jünger, Remarque, Seghers, Weiß, Wolf, Adorno and Heidegger et al. Course requirements: one or two in-class presentations; one short paper, and a term paper of about 15 pages to be written and revised during the second half of the term. The language of instruction will be German. The students' use of German for both classroom and paper is optional. Cost:3 WL:4 (Rast)

492. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber. (Simpson)

499. Seminar in German Studies. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 Doing Business in German: Advanced German for the Business Professions.
The goals of German 499 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) of Business German, as well as to familiarize the participants with the business practices of the target culture. To attain a broad functional proficiency the course will be divided into blocks such as Management, Marketing in the German environment, Accounting, and Finance in the German system, Germany's position in the European community, Germany's role in the 1992 unification of Europe. Additionally, the course will emphasize the background of the unification, the expectations of the Europeans, business opportunities after 1992 and Germany's role in world trade. The materials used throughout the course consist of a course pack, newspapers, German business reports and videotapes. One research paper will be required during the course, as well as an oral presentation on the findings. Grades will be based on the paper, the oral report, and class participation. The course is conversation oriented and it will be conducted in German. Thus, as a prerequisite, participants must have had at least three years of university level German. Qualified undergraduates as well as graduates are welcome. Cost:1 WL:4 (Van Valkenburg)

504. History of the German Language. Graduate standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 Standardization Phenomena in Western European Languages.
In this course we will consider the history of a standard language ideology (SLI) for English and German; we will start with some basic theoretical work in critical language studies and then discuss briefly how SLI functions in the U.S., in Germany, and in any other western European language which may interest participants. We will then look at the early standardization history of English, German, and perhaps French, and consider the social, political and linguistic elements which have brought about the current state of affairs. A standard language ideology is understood to be a bias toward an abstracted, idealized, (but ultimately unattainable) homogenous spoken language which is imposed from above and which takes as its model the written language. The most salient goal of SLI is the suppression of variation of all kinds; this follows from the erroneous belief that there is one spoken variety of any language which is superior (most logical, clear, concise). Not coincidentally, this is perceived to be the language of the empowered. All variation from this mainstream norm is considered undesirable. There are many lines of argumentation to support the view that social (and hence, linguistic) diversity is counterproductive and that assimilation is the ultimate and necessary goal, with repercussions in education, employment, the media and entertainment industry, and the law. There will be a lot of reading as well as a seminar presentation and a final paper. Undergraduates by permission of instructor. Readings will be taken from: Critical Language Awareness and Language and Power (Fairclough); Ideology (Eagleton); Images of English (Bailey); Language Planning and Social Change (Cooper); Linguistic Variation and Change (Milroy); French: From Dialect to Standard (Lodge); and excerpts from a number of German-language histories, particularly of the development of written German in the early modern period. Because there is little or no published work on this topic for German, we will have to construct our own. Cost:2 WL:2 (Lippi-Green)

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

448. Modern Classics in Translation: Mann, Kafka, Rilke, and Brecht. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Intended for students interested in modern literature, but without a knowledge of German, the course will serve as a critical introduction to the work of four major writers of this century, Mann and Kafka, Rilke and Brecht. Though the texts used will differ from year to year, the pattern will be to read a novel (this year Dr. Faustus and The Trial ) along with some shorter fiction by Mann and Kafka, as well as Rilke's only novel, Malte Laurids Brigge, and selected poetry (in translation by various American poets). Several plays by Brecht (this year: Mother Courage, The Caucasian Chalk Circle ) will be analyzed along with some of his poetry and of his theoretical writings on the theatre. Students will participate in class discussion and will write a short interpretive paper on one work and a longer, researched paper on one author. There will be a final exam. Cost:2 WL:2 (Seidler)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (4). (LR).

Second-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish, up to a level of Swedish 103. The emphasis is placed on developing communicative language skills, both written and oral, review and extension of basic grammar. Oral, written and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The textbook will be supplemented by newspaper articles, a children's book, some Swedish poems, etc. The instruction will principally be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 103 or the equivalent for entry into 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

234. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 233. (4). (LR).

Fourth-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish up to a level of Swedish 233. The emphasis is placed on further developing on both oral and written communicative language skills, review and extension of Swedish grammar, Swedish literature and Swedish civics (history, politics, traditions, etc.). Extracts from Swedish novels, poems, newspaper articles, and documentary articles will be used. The class will also read and discuss a Swedish novel. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed. All instruction will be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 233 or the equivalent for entry into 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

Scandinavian Courses in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of a Scandinavian language.

422. Modern Scandinavian Literature in English. Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 Ibsen and Strindberg.
Ushering in the modern age, the plays of Ibsen and Strindberg explode the Victorian myth of the happy family. In their plays, gender relations, as well as relations between parents and children, are unsettled and deeply problematic. Especially for Strindberg, sexual attraction is a destructive force, untamable by romantic rhetoric. We will read a few short stories, poems, and non-literary materials, but will primarily focus on the great dramatic works, such as Hedda Gabler, Masterbuilder, The Father, and The Dream Play. Particular attention will be paid to the cultural practices which helped shape the plays, as well as their history on the stage. Cost:2 WL:1 (Herold)

460. Issues in Modern Scandinavia. Introductory sociology or introductory political science, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 Scandinavian Cultural History.
This course covers the growth of modern Scandinavia, from the Viking era to the modern welfare state. The emphasis will be on the cultural history of the five Nordic countries, and the students will read and discuss similarities and differences in history, religion, traditions, etc., between the countries. Lecture and Readings are in English. Grades will be based on class participation, exams, and a research paper. The guest lecturer for the course is from the University of Turku, Finland. Cost:2 WL:4 (Manner)


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