Germanic Languages and Literatures

Courses in DUTCH (DIVISION 357)

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 512. (4). (LR).

This course, a continuation of 111, proceeds with the basics of the Dutch language. We will primarily use the monolingual text Code Netherlands, in which each lesson consists of an everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a comprehensive vocabulary list of one topic, questions about the conversation, homework, and a special computer exercise. To enliven the class, the teacher will present the students with a variety of texts, music, video, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. Cost:3 WL:3 (Broos)

232. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 231 or the equivalent. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 532. (4). (LR).

This course, a continuation of Dutch 231, will further examine the particular difficulties and subtleties of Dutch conversation and style. Grammatical items introduced in previous courses will be reviewed where necessary. Introduction to contemporary Dutch society by means of songs, video, comics, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course, which will be conducted mostly in Dutch. Cost:1 WL:3 (Broos)

339. Independent Study. (2-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

This course serves the needs of students who wish to develop special topics not offered in the Dutch Studies curriculum. It may be a program of directed readings with reports, or it may be a research project and long paper. Courses in the past covered different areas like Dutch-Indonesian literature, the language of Rembrandt and his contemporaries, Dutch between English and German, etc. Courses must be supervised by a faculty member and the student must have the faculty member's agreement before electing the course. Cost:1 WL:2 (Broos)

492. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 Anne Frank in Past and Present.
The first part of this course will deal with the history of Anne Frank in The Netherlands, her hiding and arrest, her famous diary, its popularity and the attacks on its authenticity. In the second part of the course we will look at the holocaust, as portrayed in other accounts, diaries, stories and films, with special emphasis on survivors and their problems, children of survivors, etc. Although some of the literary examples will be taken from the Dutch, all literature will be read in English and the course will be conducted in English. Students are asked to write a midterm paper and a final paper on a chosen subject. Regular class attendance and participation in class discussions are required. Suggested reading (tentatively): Anne Frank, The Diary; Marga Minco, Bitter Herbs; Harry Mulisch, The Assault. Cost:2 WL:2 (Broos)

495. Topics in Dutch Literature. Dutch 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course will examine prose and poetry of both the Netherlands and Belgium. Issues like the influence of the Second World War, feminist writing, Dutch Indies Literature are among the many topics that will provide the students with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and point of view of (modern) Dutch literature. The course will be conducted in Dutch. Cost:1 (Broos)

German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. All students with prior classwork in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100. (4). (LR).

German 101 is an introductory course for University of Michigan students who have not previously studied German. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) so that you are sufficiently prepared for more advanced university courses both within and outside of the German department. By the end of the term you will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of simple texts and basic conversational situations. You will also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. Most importantly you will find that acquiring the German language in a university setting will not only be intellectually stimulating and fun, but will become useful in a number of ways throughout your academic career. Cost:2 WL:1

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

German 102 completes the two term introductory German language series for University of Michigan students. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) so that you are sufficiently prepared for more advanced university courses both within and outside of the German department. By the end of the term you will have a firm foundation in the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and conversational situations. You will also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. Most importantly you will find that acquiring the German language in a university setting will not only be intellectually stimulating and fun, but will become useful in a number of ways throughout your academic career. Cost:2 WL:1

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 102. (4). (LR).

German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for University of Michigan students who have had prior German language instructions. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) so that you are sufficiently prepared for more advanced university courses both within and outside of the German department. By the end of the term you will have a firm foundation in the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and conversational situations. You will also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. Most importantly you will find that acquiring the German language in a university setting will not only be intellectually stimulating and fun, but will become useful in a number of ways throughout your academic career. Cost:2 WL:1

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of the class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. The course prerequisite is German 111 or a placement examination (CEEB, GSFLT, or departmental). Like German 111, German 112 is open only to graduate students and undergraduates in special programs. Cost:1 WL:1

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. Reading texts include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, three in-class tests, and a final examination. Cost:2 WL:1

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). Some sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss a large variety of texts. The language of instruction is German.

Please note that some sections of this course address special topics and focus on material dealing specifically with these topics. See individual descriptions of the sections for topics and course requirements.

Sections 004 and 005 Politics and Society of the Post-War Germanies. In this course we will concentrate our efforts on a small number of significant events in the history of the Post-War Germanies. We will examine geographic, economic, political, social, and cultural aspects of life in the two Germanies and in the new, reunified Bundesrepublik. Using a variety of genres and media presentations such as prose, drama, film, poetry, music, and newspaper and magazine articles, we will start with a look at the geographic, economic, political, and social structures of the two Germanies after WW II and up until the Reunification in 1990. We will then look at the fall of the wall and the Reunification. Of special interest in looking at all these aspects will be the question of Vergangenheitsbewältigung (coming to terms with the past, i.e., the Third Reich) and the situation of the Ausländer presence in Germany. The language of instruction is German. Cost:1 WL:2 (Rast and Van Valkenburg)

Section 006 Topics in Music: Mozart and The Magic Flute. Reading of the libretto in German, singing and contingent on proficiency of the course participants playing of musical highlights from The Magic Flute. In addition to readings in German on highlights in the biographies of Mozart and Magic Flute librettist Immanuel Schickaneder, and on the cultural and historical background of the work's origin, there will be guest lecturers and performers (musicologists, stage technicians, musicians, specialists in Viennese culture) demonstrating, some of them in a "hands-on" fashion, their expertise in the work in German, of course. Student evaluation based on performance in class participation, regular grammar exercises, essays, oral presentations, and final exam. Prerequisite: German 231 or equivalent (there are no musical prerequisites for the course). Cost:1 WL:4 (Bailey)

Section 007 Mathematical and Scientific German. In this course we will spend several weeks each reading, discussing, and actually doing some basic Math, Computer, Physics, Astronomy, and Biology work in German (just as Einstein learned to do these things in English...). The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. This should be easier than it perhaps sounds, because the technical terms are usually very similar in German and English, and there is a clear context for guessing the meaning of unknown words. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, and exams. Cost:1 WL:1 (Rastalsky)

Section 009 Devils and Angels: Albrecht Dürer's Nuremberg. Sixteenth century Nuremberg was a city-state in the grips of great intellectual, cultural, political, and religious upheaval. In 1500 Nuremberg could be both a center for humanistic thought, and a place where women suspected of witchcraft were tortured until they confessed. A city known for the excessive rowdiness of its Mardi Gras celebrations, it became a stronghold of the Reformation. After we have considered the city itself by means of readings, film, and lectures, we will examine the life and work of Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528), who is credited with importing the Renaissance from Italy and was the first German artist to make a name for himself through Europe. We will consider him as a man and artist, his work and his turbulent personal life. Readings and discussions in German; some outside lectures in English. Evaluation on the basis of one project, one exam, and one paper. Cost:2 WL:4 (Lippi-Green)

325. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).
Section 002 Contemporary German Politics and Economics.
The goal of this course is to familiarize students with contemporary German politics and economics, and to enable them to read and discuss newspaper articles on these topics on their own. Readings will be taken from German newspapers and magazines, and from German articles on the Internet, supplemented as necessary by excerpts from textbooks on German politics and economics. Strong emphasis will be placed on the development of the vocabulary and grammar required to read such articles. Initially, the instructor will select readings and direct discussion; as the term progresses, students will choose and present some of the readings. Course requirements include regular reading assignments; a journal on these readings; weekly quizzes on vocabulary, grammar, and the content of the previous week's readings; a couple of group presentations; and a final exam. Cost:1 WL:1 (Rastalsky)

326. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).
Section 001.
This course is designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German. Up to one third of class time will be spent on grammar review (Dreyer/Schmidt, Lehr und Übungsbuch der deutschen Grammatik) and a weekly composition provides the opportunity to practice grammatical rules and to develop stylistic flexibility. Class activities are informal and varied, but German is used throughout the meetings. There will be ample opportunity for group discussions as well as for brief presentations by each student. Audio and video tapes will used repeatedly during the term. Cost:1 WL:5, Call the instructor at 663-9673. (Weiss)

382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German dramas of the 19th and 20th centuries. These dramas reflect not only the main literary but also the significant cultural and political trends of the period. In conjunction with German 381, 383, 384, or 385 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of individual plays, but the instructor will include some biographical, literary and historical background. The texts are by Hauptmann, Schnitzler, Kaiser, Brecht, Durrenmatt and Frisch. The major language is German, but not exclusively. A term paper will be assigned. It may be in English. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. Cost:1 WL:2 (Cowen)

385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German short stories and novellas of the twentieth century, from the periods before the first world war to recent prose fiction. In conjunction with German 381, 382, 383, or 384 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of the individual works, but some historical and literary background material will be included. The texts read in recent terms were by Kafka, Mann, Musil, Boll, Dürrenmatt, and Grass. Language of instruction is German. There will be two short papers, two hour exams, and a final exam. Cost:1 WL:4 (Van Valkenburg)

426. Intermediate Composition and Conversation. German 325 and 326; or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Various approaches will be utilized to improve the students' proficiency. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape or watch a videocassette concerning the history or culture of the German-speaking countries in order to use it as a departure point for a composition or a discussion. Readings include articles of topical interest, interviews, stories, and poems. Class members are expected to give brief presentations and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on composition as well as class participation. German will be used exclusively in this class. Cost:1 WL:5, Call the instructor at 663-9673. (Weiss)

472. German Literature from Its Beginning to the Present II. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course provides an overview that integrates the students' specialized knowledge of German writers, genres, and periods into a larger interdisciplinary context. The approach is three-fold: (1) lectures in German sketch in the different philosophical, cultural, and socio-political backgrounds against which major literary works were created, certain genres flourished or disappeared, and literary movements arouse; (2) a literary history is read as a supplement to lectures and discussions; and (3) German texts from all genres (poetry, drama, narrative prose) are read in their entirety. German 471 is devoted to German literature from its beginnings to the Enlightenment; German 472 covers Sturm und Drang through contemporary literature. While identification of significant milestones in German literary history is important, greater emphasis is placed on students' ability to compare, contrast, and assimilate works of different authors, movements, and interdisciplinary influences, and on the development of the students' esthetic sensitivity, critical judgment, and imagination. Cost:2 WL:2 (Cowen)

492. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber. (Simpson)

499. Seminar in German Studies. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 Doing Business in German: Advanced German for the Business Professions.
The goals of German 499 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four skills in Business German, as well as to familiarize the participants with Germany's business practices. The course will be divided into blocks such as Management, Marketing in the German environment, Accounting, and Finance in the German system, Germany's role in the 1992 unification of Europe and its present position in Europe. Additionally, the course will emphasize the background of the unification, business opportunities after 1992 and Germany's role in world trade. The materials for the course are a course pack, newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. One research paper will be required during the course, as well as an oral presentation on the findings. Grades will be based on the paper, the oral report, tests, final exam, and class participation. The course is conversation-oriented and will be conducted in German. Prerequisite: three years of university level German or permission of instructor. Qualified undergraduates as well as graduates are welcome. Cost:1 WL:1, 4 (Van Valkenburg)

German Literature and Culture in English

448. Modern Classics in Translation: Mann, Kafka, Rilke, and Brecht. (3). (Excl).

Intended for students interested in modern literature, but without a knowledge of German, the course will serve as a critical introduction to the work of four major writers of this century, Mann and Kafka, Rilke and Brecht. Though the texts used will differ from year to year, the pattern will be to read a novel (this year: Mann's Buddenbrooks and Kafka's The Trial) along with some shorter fiction by Mann and Kafka, as well as Rilke's only novel, Malte Laurids Brigge, and selected poetry (in translation by various American poets). Several plays by Brecht (this year: Mother Courage, The Caucasian Chalk Circle ) will be analyzed along with some of his poetry and of his theoretical writings on the theatre. Students will participate in class discussion and will write a short interpretive paper on one work and a longer, researched paper on one author. There will be a final exam. Cost:2 WL:2 (Seidler)

449. Special Topics in English Translation. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Section 001 Political Cleavages and Conflicts in Germany Since 1945. The course is designed to introduce students to German politics. It will be focused around fundamental cleavages and some of the most important conflicts in Germany since 1945. This will include topics such as "Dealing with the Nazi Past," "Communism and Anti-Communism in German Politics," "Social Conflicts and the Welfare State," "New Social Movements," and "New Alignments of the Party System." By examining the patterns of conflicts and cleavages we will seek a better understanding of contemporary trends and developments in German politics. The language of instruction is English. German reading ability would be helpful, but is not required. Grading will be based on class participation, a midterm exam, and a research paper (10-12 pages). (Thaa)

Section 003 Marriage and Married Life in Germany in the Late Middle Ages and in the Renaissance. No German required. For Winter Term, 1996, this section is offered jointly with MARC 402.001. (Puff)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (4). (LR).

Second-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish, up to a level of Swedish 103. The emphasis is placed on developing communicative language skills, both written and oral, review and extension of basic grammar. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The textbook will be supplemented by newspaper articles, a children's book, some Swedish poems, etc. The instruction will principally be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 103 or the equivalent for entry into 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

234. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 233. (4). (LR).

Fourth-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish up to a level of Swedish 233. The emphasis is placed on further developing on both oral and written communicative language skills, review and extension of Swedish grammar, Swedish literature and Swedish civics (history, politics, traditions, etc.) Extracts from Swedish novels, poems, newspaper articles, and documentary articles will be used. The class will also read and discuss a Swedish novel. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed. All instruction will be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 233 or the equivalent for entry into 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

Scandinavian Courses in English

460. Issues in Modern Scandinavia. Introductory sociology or introductory political science, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 Power and Democracy in Scandinavia.
The emphasis in this course is on politics and society in Scandinavia, and on power and democracy in Sweden in particular. A number of themes central to the understanding of social life and society in northern Europe (government and political parties, the welfare state, corporatism, gender differencies, citizens' political participation and power ) are given special attention. Focus will be on modern political life, but discussions and literature also include some historical background. The assigned readings will be a course pack and two books. It will be required of the students to participate in classroom discussions on topics introduced by the lecturer. The students are also expected to write one 15-25 page paper on optional themes related to Scandinavian politics. Grades will be based on the paper and class participation. Instructor is a visiting lecturer from Sweden. Cost:2 WL:4 (Öberg)


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