Courses in GREAT BOOKS (DIVISION 382)

157/Philosophy 157. Great Books in Philosophy. Students are strongly advised not to take more than two Philosophy Introductions. (3). (HU).

See Philosophy 157. (Meiland)

192. Great Books. Open to Honors freshmen only. (4). (HU).

Continuation of Great Books 191, from Plato to the Renaissance. We will read Plato, Symposium and Republic; Vergil, The Aeneid; selections from the Old Testament and New Testament; St. Augustine, Confessions; Dante, The Divine Comedy (Inferno, and selections from Purgatorio and Paradiso ); and selections from Boccaccio. Great Books 192 is open only to freshmen in the Honors Program; other students wishing to take a similar course are encouraged to elect Great Books 202. (Cameron, Williams, et al.)

204/Physics 204. Great Books in Physics. (4). (NS).

This course is an introduction to the most important works in classical physics. The topics that will be discussed include the development of mechanics, optics and electricity and magnetism. The process by which our understanding of these physical phenomena is arrived at will also be discussed. The readings for the course have been selected to illustrate both the process of doing science, as well as describing the physical phenomenon. The texts that will be used include Galileo's Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences, Newton's Opticks, and Faraday's Diaries. Each of these texts raises as many questions as it answers. Students will be evaluated on class participation, two papers, and a final exam. There are no college physics or advanced mathematics prerequisites. Cost:2 WL:3 (Campbell)

221. Great Books of China. (4). (HU).

An introduction to some of the books that have exerted a commanding influence on the lives, thought, culture, and literary experience of the Chinese people through the ages, and that have the power to delight or enlighten Western readers today. We will begin with a short selection from the ancient Book of Changes which represents the earliest crystallization of the Chinese mind and then extend to examine several texts in the ethical, social, and political philosophy of Confucianism; two texts in the mystical philosophy of Taoism; and Sun Tzu's The Art of War, the world's oldest, and perhaps also greatest, military text. Other readings include one wild Buddhist text about the experience of enlightenment; Monkey, a novel of myth, fantasy, comedy, and allegory; The Tower of Myriad Mirrors, a sequel to Monkey exploring the world of desire, dreams, and the unconscious; and finally The Story of the Stone, a monument in fiction, set in the last high point in traditional Chinese civilization and depicting in vivid detail its splendor and decadence. Weekly one-page written assignments, three brief papers (four or five pages each), and a final examination are required. (Lin)

393. Great Books in Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts. (1). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 3 credits under different topics.
Section 001 Vergil's Roman Epic: The Aeneid.
This minicourse, a late addition to the Winter Term schedule, will meet in 3416 Mason Hall from 11 til 12 on Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning January 11 and ending February 27. We will read, discuss, identify central themes, and interpret the major work of ancient Rome's greatest poet. Lectures will situate the Aeneid in the tradition of Greco-Roman epic as well as discuss some of its enormous influence on later literature and culture. Did you know, for example, that three Vergilian phrases appear on the dollar bill? Course requirements include attendance/participation (10% of grade), one five-page paper (45%), and one exam (45%) which will be given in the last class meeting. Cost:l WL:1 (Wallin)

Section 002 Wagner's Ring. This minicourse, a late addition to the Winter Term schedule, will meet in 3416 Mason Hall from 11 til 12 on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays beginning Tuesday, March 19 and ending Thursday, April 18. "Mark well my new poem it contains the world's beginning and its end," Wagner wrote to Liszt. For our part, we will attempt to "mark" it "well" by reading, discussing, identifying central themes, and interpreting all four poetic dramas of Richard Wagner's monumental Ring of the Nibelung: The Rheingold, The Valkyrie, Siegfried, and Twilight of the Gods. No knowledge of music is necessary. Our focus will be on the verbal texts (in English translation), but we will take some time to view excerpts on film of recent performances. While we will give our attention chiefly to the dramas themselves, lectures will place the Ring in its historical, social, and cultural setting. Course requirements include attendance/participation (10% of grade), one five-page paper (45%), and one exam (45%) which will be given in the last class meeting. Cost:l WL:1 (Wallin)


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