Romance Languages and Literatures

French, Italian, and Spanish Placement Tests

If you are planning to take an elementary French, Italian, or Spanish class and you are a new student, freshman or transfer student, or you have not yet begun the elementary language sequence on the Ann Arbor campus, you must take the placement test in order to register for the correct course. You must register for the class into which you have been placed.

If you have registered for a class prior to taking the test, you will still be required to take the test in order to verify that you are in the appropriate level class.

If you have already taken French, Italian, or Spanish 101-232 on the Ann Arbor campus, or if you have already taken the placement test once, you are not eligible to take the test again. For questions regarding the LS&A language requirement, please see a general academic advisor or call POINT-10 (764-6810).

Please Note: With the reduction in the number of classrooms throughout LS&A, departments must limit the number of classes offered between 10 am and 4 pm. There will be more classes open before 10 am and after 4 pm. Please take advantage of the opportunity to register for these classes and avoid the "Lottery" (see 2b below).

Instructions for students requesting overrides for French or Spanish 101, 103, 231, or 232.

1. Try to find a section that will fit into your schedule, since the Department cannot guarantee every student a space in a section of his/her own choice.

However, do not register for a class that you cannot attend. You will not be eligible to override into the section of your choice if you are registered for any section of 101-232, even if you cannot attend that section.

2. As it states in the Time Schedule any registered student who misses one of the first four class meetings will be dropped from the course, thereby leaving some open spaces for those students who have been closed out.

If there is absolutely no section open which will fit your schedule, you should follow this procedure:

(a) Start attending the section you would like to get into on the first day of class. You will receive a Proof of Attendance form which must be signed by your instructor every day. You must attend a class every day, but it does not need to be the same section. All students must take action at CRISP to make sure their official schedule of courses matches the courses they are taking.

(b) On Tuesday, January 16 at 7:00 p.m., there will be a meeting in the basement of the MLB, rooms to be announced later, for each of the above courses. At these meetings, students will be assigned to remaining vacated spaces in the most fair and equitable manner possible, using a lottery system. At no time, however, will any class be allowed to exceed 25 students. Students must bring their CRISP Official Printout of Classes and the Proof of Attendance form to the meeting!

3. Please note that you will not be allowed to change sections at the French meetings. Beginning Wednesday, January 17, Elementary French Language Supervisors will hear requests for section changes and fill those requests to whatever degree is possible.

4. Please ensure when adding with the override that you also add modifiers for pass/fail, etc.

Courses in

French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. It is strongly recommended that students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test.

101. Elementary French. Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded. Cost:3 WL:See statement above

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

See French 101. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

French 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in French 101/102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the course coordinator. Because students are expected to be already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace, and students will need to plan on spending at least 8-10 hours each week preparing daily lessons. The objectives and methods of instruction are similar to those of French 101/102. Frequent quizzes (with both oral and written components) are administered to check students' assimilation of material. There are two hourly exams, a final and speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language.

231. Second-Year French. French 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 is built upon the work done in French 101/102. It presents intensive and comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French grammar structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on subjects of intellectual interest, to understand conversation on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as midterm and final examinations.

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

In French 232, students will continue learning and reviewing vocabulary and grammar from the second half of the book Ensuite. There will be short weekly readings (advertisements, literary excerpts, and short stories) and by the middle of the term, students will begin reading a full-length French novel! (They will read the majority of the novel on their own and take a reading comprehension test at the end of the term.) Throughout the term, students will listen to French songs, see several videos (from French television) as well as two French movies. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. In addition to the outside reading test, there will be 3 course-wide tests, a midterm, and a final examination.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

214/Hist. 214. Interpretations of French Society and Culture. Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU).
Section 001 – French Empires and Colonies, 1715-1968.
This course examines the historical and political construction of the French overseas empire. Second in size and population to the British Empire, the French Empire at its peak encompassed large parts of the South Pacific, Indochina, and North and West Africa. In other eras, the French claimed portions of North and South America, and of the Indian subcontinent. In this class, we will compare these varied colonial and imperial experiences – both in terms of what they meant for "France," and of how they affected the colonized peoples. Special attention is paid to cultural constructions and encounters: early ethnography and "the noble savage"; Egyptomania and the First Empire; educational policy; colonial exhibitions and expositions; the enduring notion of "la francophonie." (Spang)

342. French and Francophone Film Taught in English. Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU).

French national cinema and French co-productions: capital or culture? What is at stake for the filmmaker? For the funding agencies/countries? For the viewing public? In this course we will attempt to understand the economic and cultural relationship between French national cinema and French film co-productions. Because these co-productions involve the participation of one or more other nations, we will explore each country's historical and social ties to France. This will bring up questions of cultural production and ownership, postcolonial politics as well as questions of financing and funding of films. Screenings will include film and video from both French national cinema and co-productions. Required work: one essay, a midterm, and a final. (Yervasi)

Cultural and Literary Studies

270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture. French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.
Section 001 – Disease and Community.
This course will study how various concepts of health and disease have been used throughout French literary, social and political history. What is normal and what is deviant? What are the links between medical science and literature? How was medicine used to define race and sexuality? If disease can be used as exclusion, can it also be used in a positive way? What is the AIDS crisis telling us about French society? Oral presentations and short papers. Readings: Montaigne, D'un enfant monstrueux; Chateaubriand, Atala – René; Zola, Thérèse Raquin; Maupassant, Le Horla; Excerpts from Drumont, La France juive, and Barres on the Orient; Gide, L'Immoraliste; Alain Emmanuel Dreuilhe, Corps-à-corps: journal de sida; various documents on antisemitic iconography, colonialism, etc.; and various documents on AIDS, including newspaper and magazine articles, political writings, etc. Films (if possible): adaptations of Zola, Gervaise or La bête humaine or Germinal; Cyril Collard, Les nuits fauves. (Caron)

Section 002 – Legal Issues in 20th Century Literature. In this course we shall investigate the interaction of the discourses of lawyers and fiction writers. Specific cases from such authors as Camus (The Stranger), Sarrazin (selections from her works), Goldman (in selection), Livrozet (in selection) and Lévy (in selection) will be examined and discussed. Participation in class discussion will be required. Assignment will consist of three short papers (4-5 pages) and an oral presentation. (Ekotto)

Section 003. Intensive study of French literature and its social context, centered on the cultural production of a single remarkable year, 1953. Students will be introduced to the methods and practice of French literary and cultural study and develop their linguistic proficiency through class discussions and writing (approx. 20 pages). Besides discussion of assigned works, the course will include some lectures about developments in the social sciences, arts, politics and culture in France. Readings have yet to be finalized but will include one or two "nouveau romans" (Robbe-Grillet, Sarraute), a play (Beckett), one or two African or Maghrebin novels (Camara Laye, Memmi, Chraibi), several critical essays on culture, literature, and cinema (Barthes, Truffaut), and possibly a movie or two ( Les Vacances De M. Hulot, Le Salaire De La Peur ). Check the World Wide Web at http://www.umich.edu/~jmgraham for reading list at registration time. Regular class attendance and participation is essential; no exams. (Graham)

366(386)/MARC 386. Medieval Literature, History, and Culture. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

This course studies the changing and often difficult relationship between individuals, institutions and society in medieval France, centered on the figure of the intellectual. An introduction to the study of medieval literature and culture, the course will offer practical strategies for reading and analyzing medieval texts and help students gain self-confidence in speaking and writing in French. Class activities include lectures, discussions in large and small groups, and individual presentations. The instructor strives to establish a comfortable atmosphere where students can participate freely and actively. Readings in modern French include Abelard's spicy intellectual autobiography, Histoire De Mes Malheurs, extensive selections from the single most influential work of French literature, the Roman De La Rose, works of Christine de Pizan (selections from La Cite Des Dames and from her lyric poems), and social historian Jacques Le Goff's study of the role of the intellectual in the Middle Ages. No previous study of literature or history is expected. Regular class attendance and participation is essential; written work includes 20 pages divided between three papers and a journal; no exams. (Graham)

367/368/369 Introduction to French Literature.

The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.

368(388). Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

This course will focus on a representative work of five of the most important writers of the period in question, namely Rousseau, Beaumarchais, Balzac, Baudelaire, and Sand. Emphasis will be placed on the literary and thematic aspects of the works read, together with appropriate consideration of their historical, political, and cultural context. A typical assignment will consist of reading some twenty pages of a given work and preparing to discuss them in class. Students will write four papers in French (three or four pages in length) during the course of the term. Each paper will be corrected for grammar, choice of expression and content. The course grade will be based on the results of written work and on classroom participation. Regular attendance is required. The course will be conducted in French. (Gray)

369(389). Literature, History, and Culture of Modernity. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 – Circulation and the City.
This course will explore the notions of circulation as they pertain to the specific phenomenon of urban Modernity in Paris from the mid-19th century (1848) through the 1930s. What is Modernity and why is circulation a key concept? What is the relationship between circulation and Modernity? What links the notion of circulation to literature and painting? What does the advent of photography and cinematography bring to this culture? What role will architecture and infrastructure of the city – above ground (boulevards) and below (subways, sewers) – play during this period? We will examine the history and culture of Modernity through the study of literary texts; historical documents; architecture; urban development; photography; cinema; and the mutual influences of these forces on this culture. Required work: two short papers, an oral presentation, a midterm, and a final paper. Students will also be asked to keep a journal of their studies. Readings: Louis Aragon, Le paysan de Paris; Charles Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal; Charles Baudelaire, Le Spleen de Paris: Petits poèmes en prose; and Émile Zola, Le ventre de Paris. (Yervasi)

375. Cinema and Society in the Francophone World. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 – Representing the Family in Francophone Literature and Cinema.
This course aims to pinpoint and to acquaint students with the impact of French language and culture on the French speaking world and in general, on its literature and cinema in particular. We shall address questions developed in narratives of family representations and attempt to map out the cultural production generated by families studied. Participation in class discussions will be required. Required work: three short papers (4- 5 pages) and an oral presentation. (Ekotto)

379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 – Aids in France: Literature and Politics.
France is the European country with the highest rate of HIV and AIDS. After almost a decade of silence and denial about the seriousness of the epidemic, there has been a recent shift in public perceptions and reactions, along with a sudden increase in literary and cultural production addressing the crisis. A large number of texts have emerged – essays, novels, plays, first and third person testimonials, etc.; some were so successful their authors became household names; certain films and TV programs were widely seen; activism is on the rise: AIDS has finally entered French society. This course will focus on both the literary and the sociopolitical aspects of the AIDS crisis in France. It will address issues such as: the reasons for the initial period of denial, the cause(s) of the shift described above, the construction of the AIDS patient in the media and in literature, literary and political resistance to the dominant discourses on AIDS, the problems in representing the unspeakable (disaster, one's own death), the relation between the AIDS crisis and previous constructions of sameness and otherness in French culture, the way in which AIDS criticism may provide the basis for a rethinking of social relations in France today, etc. Tentative reading list: Hervé Guibert, A l'ami qui ne m'a pas sauvé la vie; Pascal de Duve, Cargo Vie; Cyril Collard, Les nuits fauves; Jean-Noël Pancrazi, Les quartiers d'hiver; and course pack including texts by: Gilles Barbedette, Hervé Guibert, Copi, Bertrand Duquénelle, Michel Manière, René de Ceccatty, Christophe Martet, ACT UP-Paris, etc. (Caron)

464(454). Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

This course will examine the development of the novel in the Age of Enlightenment. All major eighteenth-century authors wrote novels that challenged literary and social conventions. We will read Voltaire, Montesquieu, Prévost, Diderot, Rousseau, Laclos, and Charriére. Taking into consideration foreign influences and literary practices, we will consider the ways in which these texts question traditional ideas of politics, gender, religion and language. Two papers (5-8 pages), one oral presentation. In French. (Huet)

465(455). Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 – Literature, History, and Revolutions.
The French nineteenth century was an era of intense political and social change, punctuated by the revolutions of 1830, 1848, and 1871, all of which could be described as the aftershocks of the French Revolution of 1789-1799. History and revolution loom large in French fiction and poetry of the period, both as overt subject matter and as points of reference for writing about everything from politics to private life. In this course, we'll study short stories, novels, poems, and a brief "Introduction to Universal History" by the romantic historian Jules Michelet; our aim will be to understand better the culture and history of France and the relations between literature and history. Authors studied will include Madame de Duras, Stendhal, Balzac, Sand, Flaubert, Hugo, Baudelaire, and Rimbaud. Two papers (6-8 pages); active participation in class activities; one oral examination. Cost:2 WL:4 (Paulson)

Other Language Courses

112. Second Special Reading Course. French 111 or equivalent. French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of French 111-112 does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

This course is designed to increase the reading proficiency gained in French 111. It begins with an intensive and comprehensive review of grammar and idioms, followed by special work for sight-reading. Toward midterm, students select several articles of a book in their field of specialization for outside reading, and they complete their reading on their own with frequent consultation with the instructor. Classes meet in sections of 25 students for four times per week. There are weekly quizzes, course-wide midterm and final examinations.

235(361). Advanced Practice in French. French 232 or equivalent. May not be included in a concentration plan in French. (3). (Excl).

French 235 uses a cultural content as a basis for oral and written communication. It is a content course in which current problems and issues in French society are studied through readings (textbook, education system, sexism, immigrants, and racism); videos (documentaries, news programs exposés on current issues), and films. The course focuses on developing student's ability to support opinions oral and in writing in a coherent manner. Students gain experience by working through texts in class and through class discussion, three oral presentations, and three medium-length papers. The final examination is an individual oral presentation. Active participation for 20% of the final grade.

333(363). French Phonetics. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

This course, conducted in French, is designed to introduce basic concepts in phonetic theory and to help students improve their pronunciation of French through (1) study of the physical characteristics of individual sounds, the relationship between sounds and their written representations, the rules governing pronunciation of "standard" French, and (2) intensive oral practice in the production of French consonants and vowels, syllabification, intonation, liaison, and deletion/retention of the "mute E." During the first week, students will record a speech sample and will be informed of problem areas to work on independently using audio tapes. Homework for each class consists of reading theory, writing phonetic transcriptions using the International Phonetic Alphabet, and oral practice with tapes. Participation, 1-2 oral quizzes, and the final oral exam will evaluate proficiency in pronunciation. Written homework, quizzes, a midterm, and a final written exam will evaluate ability to use the phonetic alphabet and knowledge of basic theory. This is NOT a conversation class. Prerequisite: two courses taught in French beyond French 232 or RC French 290, or permission of instructor. (Neu)

335(371). Composition and Stylistics. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Study of a variety of written text types, and intensive practice to develop lexical, syntactic, and stylistic features contributing to fluency in writing for academic, professional, and personal purposes.

370/RC Core 370. Advanced Proficiency in French. RC Core 320, or French 362, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

See RC Core 370. (Butler-Borruat)

380. Intermediate Business French. French 361, and prior or concurrent enrollment in French 362. A maximum of six credits of French 380, 414, and Business Administration 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the language of business transactions in France. It deals with both written and spoken commercial French. It is partly built around a fictitious company whose activities are divided into themes dealing with various aspects of the business world: banking, advertising, claims and disputes regarding products, organization and hierarchy of the enterprise, applying for a job in France. The writing will concentrate on commercial correspondence and will stress the formal nature of written business French. Attendance mandatory. No auditors. Maximum enrollment is 25. Prerequisite: French 235 and one additional French course numbered 250 or above.

Courses in

Italian (Division 399)

Elementary Language Courses

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (LR).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with parallel emphasis on conversation. Text, workbook, and lab manual required; Italian 101 covers the first half of the text. Course topics include (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and other position. Methods of instruction include (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation of both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm, and a final examination.

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden the student's knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also emphasized. The course covers the second half of the text, workbook, and lab manual; readings supplement this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing, and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination.

206. Conversation for Non-concentrators. Italian 102 or equivalent. Italian 206 may be elected prior to Italian 205. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Italian 206 emphasizes fluency and self-expression in conversational Italian. This course is designed for students who have had at least two terms of Italian and are interested in acquiring a certain facility with the spoken language. Class work consists of reading materials from various sources (magazines, newspapers, short stories, etc.) which will be discussed in class. Use of the language laboratory will provide additional conversational material on various aspects of Italian life. Classes will meet twice a week. There are no examinations, and the grading is on a credit basis only. Success in the course is determined on the basis of attendance, homework, and participation in the classroom activities.

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Text, workbook and lab manual required. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions and oral report center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112. (4). (LR).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian, including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. Text, workbook, and lab manual required. There is a continuing review of grammar, and the elements of composition. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

Other Language and Literature Courses

360. Italian Culture and History, Eighteenth to Twentieth Centuries. (3). (HU).

This course, treating the 18th century through the 20th century, emphasizes the political, social, and cultural difficulties that Italy encountered once it had lost the privileged position it held in Europe during the Renaissance. The importance of European movements, such as Illuminism and Romanticism, will be stressed as both artistic and political manifestations. Particular attention will be given to the mid-19th century struggle for the unification of the country, and the conditions that allowed the Fascist takeover. The Fascist period will be analyzed, considering in particular the position of the intellectuals toward the dictatorship. The achievements of Italy after the second World War will be the focus of the last part of the course. We will take into consideration the economy, the political system, the social structures, the geography, and the standard of living of contemporary Italy. Selected works by the following authors will be read Goldoni, Alfieri, Foscolo, Mazzini, Manzoni, Leopardi, Carducci, Verga, and numerous 20th-century figures. A knowledge of Italian, while not required, will be useful. In addition to active class participation, students will be required to write two or three short papers during the term. (Frisch)

362. Advanced Italian. Italian 361 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Further proficiency in oral and writing skills will be stressed in Italian 362. Reading materials will include short fiction and non-fiction, as well as lengthier assignments of outside reading on which various written and oral assignments will be made. Participation in class discussion, occasional oral presentations, weekly compositions based for the most part on assigned readings, the subject matter of which will deal primarily with subjects of topical interest. Continuing grammar difficulties will be treated as they arise. The course will be conducted in Italian and will meet three hours weekly. (Habekovic)

380. Italian Cinema and Society. A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($10) required.
Section 001 – Italian Cinema and Society since 1945.
The course, which will be taught in English, traces the historical development of Italian cinema from the postwar advent of neorealism to the mid 1980s. The course has several aims: (1) to understand the political, economic, and cultural contexts which generated and supported the neorealist movement; (2) to explore and analyze the theoretical bases of neorealism and its reception, both friendly and hostile, in Italian intellectual/political circles; (3) to examine various aspects of the movement beyond neorealism proper in films of the 1950s and 1960s by Fellini, Visconti, Olmi, Bertolucci, and Bellocchio; and (4) to expose the rethinking and reevaluation of the neorealist aesthetic as carried out by Scola, the Taviani Brothers, Nichetti and Salvatores in the 1970s and 1980s. The course requirements, beyond class participation, will be three 6-8 page papers. A knowledge of Italian is useful, but is not required. (Frisch)

433/MARC 439. Dante in Translation. A knowledge of Italian is not required. Not open to Italian concentrators. (3). (HU).

Open to concentrators and non-concentrators alike, this course is devoted to a reading of what is undeniably one of the richest and most resonant creations of Western literature, Dante's Divine Comedy. An exile from his native Florence, Dante levies an intense critique of the society of thirteenth-century Italy, in which he was raised, as well as a profound meditation on European culture, broadly conceived, in its merits and its failings. Written at the climax of the Middle Ages, this book attempts to sort out the inevitable clash between a recently rediscovered pagan inheritance, on the one hand, and a modern Christian imperative on the other – salvaging what it can, in terms of science, ethics, poetry, and political thought, from the wreckage of past civilizations as well as from the crisis of its own. The poem's narration of a professed journey through the many layered realms of the afterlife will be read in all its three parts, Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, in facing-page translation in order to benefit those who know some Italian as well as those who do not. Attention will paid nonetheless to the language of Dante's poetry, a revolution in its own right, and to his manipulation of his numerous sources of inspiration - Vergil, Ovid, Statius, Lucan, the Bible, Augustine and other Church fathers, medieval romantic and lyric literature, scientific and theological treatises, etc. The format of the course will consist of lecture and discussion, and evaluation will be on the basis of two short papers (4-6 pp.), a midterm, and final exam. (Cornish)

472. Italian Theatre from Alfieri to Pirandello. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 – Pirandello's Drama.
This course will treat the dramas of one of Italy's greatest modern playwrights, Luigi Pirandello. While we will consider Pirandello's major theater in some detail, we will also review his narratives and his essays in order to understand the social and intellectual background of fascist Italy. In addition, various contemporary dramatists will be discussed. Requirements for the course are the following: two essays (5-8 pp. each); a class presentation; and a final exam. Readings and discussion will be either in English or Italian depending on the composition of the class. (Lucente)

486. Petrarch's Canzoniere. Italian 232 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 – Petrarch's
Canzoniere. Having perfected the persona of the eternally weeping lover and polished the lyric forms of sonnet, canzone, and madrigal, Francesco Petrarca had the single greatest influence on European poetry for several centuries. At the same time, his creation of the role of the public intellectual made him the model and ideal for generations of humanists, from Florence to Erasmus' Rotterdam. This course will consider the two sides of Petrarch, the Italian and the Latin, focusing on his lyric masterpiece, known as the Canzoniere, but reflecting on the moral and literary message of his prose works as well. The Latin texts will be read in English translation and the Canzoniere in a dual language edition in order to accommodate readers however slightly acquainted with Italian. There are no prerequisites for the course, which is open to concentrators and non-concentrators alike. Evaluation will be on the basis of class participation, written work consisting of two short papers (4-6 pp.), and a final exam. (Cornish)

Courses in

Portuguese (Division 452)

102. Elementary Portuguese. Portuguese 101. (4). (LR).

A continuation of Portuguese 101 composition and reading skills given more practice. Grade based on departmental exams, oral exams, quizzes, written assignments, and daily oral work. (Fedrigo)

232. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 231. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Portuguese and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, history, culture, outlooks, and habits of Portuguese-speaking peoples. Course grade is based on exams, designed to assess ability to speak, understand, read, and write Portuguese, plus periodic written work (including compositions) and oral class participation. (Fedrigo)

Courses in

Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students must check with the Program Director for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (LR).

Course objectives: The first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Course objectives: introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, chapter exams, and a final written and oral exam.

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Course objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on one oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to provide insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course objectives: content-based themes develop cultural awareness and encourage students to formulate opinions on a variety of contemporary issues through reading, video, discussion, and writing. Grammatical concepts considered within a functional whole; students responsible for home study of individual points. Classroom activities stress communication across the four skills with a strong oral/written component. Video, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: regular attendance essential. Participation includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Pre- and post-reading activities take place in class; reading activities done at home. Writing samples prepared in class and at home. Grade based on oral presentations, classroom participation, homework assignments, periodic oral and written tests, and a final written exam.

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

See Spanish 231 for a general description.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

112. Second Special Reading Course. Spanish 111 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors, and seniors, and to others by special permission. For graduate students a grade of B or better in Spanish 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for the doctorate. (Carbón Gorell)

Other Language Courses

358. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators. Spanish 232 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 361 or 362. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 358 is a practical Spanish conversation course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

361. Grammar and Composition. Spanish 232 or equivalent. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 361 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare translations and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

362. Reading and Composition. Spanish 361 or equivalent. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 362 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Literature

372. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 361. Spanish 362 recommended. (3). (HU).

The late eighteenth-century and the 1930s mark the two extremes of the period represented in this survey of modern Spanish literature. The course will thus lay a good historical foundation for further Spanish courses and for comparisons to readings from other literatures. Essays, plays, poems, and novels are analyzed as individual works for the beginning student, methods and approaches of literary criticism are considered, and an effort is made to show how the works exemplify their cultural context, ranging from the Enlightenment through Romanticism, Positivism, Generation of '98 to Symbolism. Representative authors who may be studied are Moratín, Larra, Bécquer, Galdós, Azorín, Unamuno, and Lorca. The class format is basically recitation, but lectures and reports will also be used. Exercises consist of three sets of papers spread throughout the term. The course is conducted in Spanish. (Anderson)

373. Topics in Spanish Literatures. Spanish 361. Spanish 362 recommended. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 – Toward the Spanish Inquisition.
An introduction to the social, cultural, and religious circumstances that led to the forcible conversion of Spanish Jews and their subsequent role in Spanish life. Students will learn the general outlines of this immensely complex and important moment of Spanish History. Prerequisites: two courses in the 300 series and good reading ability. (Casa)

Section 002 – La imagen de la mujer y del amor en Espa–a desde el Renacimiento hasta el Romanticismo. En este curso se verá, a través de la literatura, la imagen de la mujer espa–ola desde la Edad Media hasta el Romanticismo. Las fuentes usadas presentan la imagen de la mujer vista por el hombre escritor o pensador, y por la de la misma mujer escritora. Una selección de textos la poesía medieval de árabes, judíos y cristianos. Del Siglo de oro, textos de Fray Luis de Leon, de Santa Teresa, de María de Zayas, de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, y otros varios hasta Rosalía de Castro. Una hora por semana se dedicará a la discusión de los temas y de los textos. Se harán diversos ejercicios escritos, en clase y en casa. Un examen de mitad de término y el final. Ensayo consistente en una selección de textos de las autoras estudiadas, con un estudio introductorio y notas explicativas. (Grigera)

Section 003 – Literature, Art, and Film of the Spanish Avant-Garde. This course will concentrate on the Spanish avant-garde, 1918 – 1936, a period of radical experimentation in the arts. Based upon readings from literary magazines, as well as viewings of films and art-slides, we will examine the "cultural dialogue" of the period – focusing on the issues and problems that preoccupied contemporary writers and artists. Given that this dialogue took place in an international frame, we will also consider how Spanish literature and art participated in European artistic movements, such as futurism, cubism, dada, and surrealism. Readings will include short stories, essays, film reviews, poetry, and drama. Assignments will include an oral presentation, short written assignments, two exams, and a final project. This final project will consist of a sampling of writings from student-designed cultural magazines. Working either individually or in groups, students will create an inaugural issue of a proposed avant-garde magazine, including a statement of purpose and table of contents. Each students should contribute approximately ten pages of writing that may comprise essays, manifestos, fiction, poetry, and film or drama reviews. Photography, collage, and graphics may also be included. Methods: lecture-discussion. Conducted in Spanish. (Highfill)

374. Monographic Studies in Latin American Literature. Spanish 361. Spanish 362 recommended. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 – El testimonio latinoamericano.
En el periodo (1970-1985) se produce la publicación numerosa de testimonios (narrativas "no-ficticias") en Latinoamérica. Este nuevo conjunto de obras ha tenido una lectura masiva y ha generado, a partir de 1980, una inmensa reflexión crítica literaria. Los críticos literarios han consideraro al testimonio una forma literaria "auténticamente" latinoamericana y la línea "dominante" de la literatura latinoamericana del llamado "postboom." En este curso vamos a rastrear la genealogía y discutir los aportes críticos mas significativos sobre este corpus narrativo. Además vamos a leer Biografía de un cimarrón de Miguel Barnet, días de la Selva de Mario Payeras, La masacre de Tlatelolco de Elena Poniatowska, Autobiografía de Gregorio Condori Mamani, Me llamo Rigoberta Menchú y así me nació la conciencia de Rigoberta Menchú. El curso será dictado en espa–ol. La evaluación consiste en controles de lectura sobre las obras narrativas escogidas, dos ensayos cortos, un examen final ("take home") y las intervenciones en clase. (Zevallos-Aguilar)

375. Civilizaciòn de Espa–a (Spanish Civilization). Spanish 361. Spanish 362 recommended. (3). (Excl).

This course will focus on some current issues that confront Spanish democracy. Social, economic, political, and cultural aspects of Spanish life will be discussed. For example, what do the Spanish people think about abortion or the relationship between the Church and the State? How has the Spanish economy changed since Spain's entry into the Common Market? Are the Spanish people satisfied with their monarchy and the present socialist government? What do the Spaniards think changed when Spain joined NATO? How did the cultural life improve after the death of the dictator Francisco Franco? The objective of the course is to discuss the contemporary problems as well as the historical origins of these and other questions and to expose students to the perspective that the current democracy introduced. The course will cover information about these issues through readings and lectures. The goal is to stimulate critical thinking by the students and discussion in the class. (Calvo)

381. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 361. Spanish 362 recommended. (3). (HU).

This course covers Latin American Literature written from the time of the encounter and conquest (1492), through the Colonial era and up to the early modern period. Representative texts from each of these periods and from all the major genres will be studied. The course will concentrate both on the intrinsic literary qualities and features of the texts and on their relationship with the country and historical moment in which they were produced. Teaching will be conducted entirely in Spanish, in a mixture of lecture and discussion format. Evaluation will be a mixture of presentations, exams, and short-to-medium papers. Active class participation is expected.

388. Spanish and Spanish-American Literatures Today. Spanish 361. Spanish 362 recommended. (3). (HU).
Section 001 – Migrant Bodies, Hybrid Texts.
For Winter Term, 1996, this course is offered jointly with American Culture 410.001. (Aparicio)

451. Spanish Literature of the Fifteenth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 – Encounters with Love in 15th Century Spain.
The end of fifteenth century brought the cultural, political and religious consolidation of Spain and the imperial extension of the new state in the conquest and exploration of what was for the Europeans an unknown world. This course will study the period's exploration of a more intimate, but equally mysterious region – the heart. We will explore fifteenth-century codifications of a literary discourse of love, the circulation of love-literature through courtly circles and through the newly-invented printing press, and resistances to its dissemination. Readings will include a moral treatise against both love and women (Arcipreste de Talavera o el Corbacho), a sentimental romance ( Cárcel de amor), chivalric romance (Tirante el blanco ), the bawdy tragicomedy La Celestina, and love poetry from the Cancioneros, and by Ausias March and Santillana. Old Spanish works will be read in the original language; other texts in modern Spanish translation. (Brown)

456. Golden Age. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course will deal with the major writers of the Spanish Golden age: Garcilaso, Fray Luis de Leon, Gongora, San Juan de la Cruz, Quevedo, Lope de Vega, Calderon, and Tirso de Molina. Among the works to be read will be poetry, narrative, and theater. We will focus both on the cultural and literary aspects of the texts in question. Prerequisites: three course in the 300 series. (Casa)

470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 – Colonial/Postcolonial Studies.
This course will introduce students to Latin American Colonial Studies, 1492-1800s. We will study representative texts from different genres: Relaciones, Chronicles, Letters, Epic Poetry, Lyrical Poetry, Drama, and Novel. Literary readings will be complemented with Cultural Studies approaches to the Colonial period. Consequently, we will not be exclusively concerned with written texts using the Latin alphabet but will also study other cultural artifacts as maps, icons, confessionaries and Native American writing systems. Some of the questions we will discuss are: the discovery/invention of America; knowledge as power in colonization and conquest; resistance discourses; women in the colonial period; the novel and the emergence of the nation. The Native-American chronicles will include texts written in alphabetic script as well as visual representations drawing elements from pre-Hispanic forms of iconic script. Particular attention will be paid to how these postconquest texts tend to subvert the function and the meaning of written discourse and pictorial perspective in Western culture, and thus to constitute forms of cultural survival. We will read Columbus, Cortés, Alonso de Ercilla, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Guaman Poma, Sor Juana, Sahagún, missionary theater, among others. Primary readings will be paired with recent criticism in English and Spanish (essays by Walter Mignolo, Rolena Adorno, Maureen Ahern, Jean Franco, Jorge Klor de Alva, Peter Hulme). We will approach Colonial texts from a Postcolonial critical framework. Course requirements: students will be responsible for two short papers (7-10 pages) and weekly short oral/written presentations. The short assignments will consist of a list of questions intended to guide the student through the readings. Evaluation: two papers (60%), oral/written presentation (20%), and class participation (20%). (Rabasa)

475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

La diversidad cultural y la complejidad social de Latinoamérica han sido expresadas en las obras narrativas de varios escritores latinoamericanos contemporáneos. En este curso luego de dar una aproximación panorámica a las fundaciones culturales, geográficas, históricas, sociales y políticas de Latinoamérica nos dedicaremos a las siguientes tareas. Primero, vamos a revisar los conceptos de "transculturación narrativa," "literaturas heterogéneas," "literaturas alternativas" y "culturas híbridas" con los que la crítica literaria y cultural han tratado de abordar la literatura latinoamericana. Segundo, vamos a leer una selección de cuentos, ensayos y novelas de José María Arguedas, Miguel Angel Asturias, Alejo Carpentier, Rosario Castellanos, Rigoberta Menchú, Darcy Ribeiro, Augusto Roa Bastos, Juan Rulfo y Mario Vargas Llosa con el propósito de conocer de qué manera representan las diferentes realidades étnico-culturales y cuáles son las políticas culturales que dise–an. La evaluación consiste en controles de lectura sobre las obras narrativas escogidas, dos exámenes, un ensayo y las intervenciones en clase. (Zevallos-Aguilar)

485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent or permission of advisor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

This upper-level literature course will be concerned with a particular aspect of modern Latin-American literature; monographic in nature, it will allow students to deepen their knowledge of a particular field or aspect of one or more countries' literary production. Teaching will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

488. Topics in Spanish Literature. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 – Federico García Lorca.
This upper-level literature course will be concerned with a number of representative works by Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), Spain's most famous twentieth-century writer. We shall concentrate on several of the collections of poetry and several of the plays, but not to the exclusion of a variety of lesser-known prose works. The primary approach will be intrinsic, based on close reading, but the works will also be contextualized within the period and we shall consider some of the salient aspects of Lorca's biography. Teaching, conducted entirely in Spanish, will be a mixture of lecture, class discussion, and a number of informal oral presentations. Evaluation is by attendance, class participation, and several medium-length papers. (Anderson)


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