Courses in Theatre and Drama (Division 695)

101. Introduction to Acting 1. Permission of instructor. Open to non-concentrators. (3). (Excl).
Sections 001.
This course is designed as a general introduction to the fundamental skills of acting in the theatre. It involves discussion and practical work, including theatre games, warm-up, monologue, and scene work. Some papers and selected reading. Brief, informal interviews are required for admission to all sections. Sign up for an interview with the instructor (interview times are posted about the time the Time Schedules come out, further details at Theatre Office, Room 2550, Frieze Building. Cost:1 (001:Maylie)

Section 002. This course is designed as a general introduction to the fundamental skills of acting in the theatre. It involves discussion and practical work, seeking to explore the nature of acting and to increase the students' abilities as actors. Classes will follow two parallel lines: technical work on body, voice and speech, and imaginative work involving improvision, observation, enquiry, and building a character and scene. Cost:1 WL:2 (Brown)

102. Introduction to Acting 2. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to build on the experience of Theatre 101 or Theatre 181. The course offers an introduction to acting in the theatre, with particular attention to the fundamentals of dramatic action and characterization. Scene work is stressed. Scenes and monologues will be performed in class, and graded, and a midterm examination will also be part of the grade in the course. Brief, informal interviews are required for admission to all sections. Further details at Theatre Office, Room 2550, Frieze Building. Texts: Robert Cohen, Acting One, 2d edition, and Ed. McNamara, Plays from the Contemporary American Theater. Cost:2 (Woods)

211/RC Hums. 280/English 245. Introduction to Drama and Theatre. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).
Section 002.
What have "theater" and "drama" meant at different times in history, what do they mean now, and what else could they mean? What impulses and skills have gone and go into the creation of theatrical events, and what needs do they attempt to fulfill? What's meant by "performance," "stage," "audience," "director," "tragedy," "comedy," and a dozen other terms we tend nowadays to use rather casually? In attempting to answer such questions we will be examining certain key scripts in their theatrical and social contexts. The relevant playwrights are likely to include Euripides, Shakespeare, Molière, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, and Beckett. Students will also be introduced to some of the practical requirements of theatre-making, as a further means of comprehending the complex enterprise which is "Theatre-and-drama." Course requirements include participation in class discussion and activities, written projects, and exams. The course functions by lectures and sections, the second of which allows more detailed discussion and some elementary scene-work. Cost:3 WL:4 (Cardullo)

222/CAAS 341. Introduction to Black Theatre. (3). (HU).

This course will cover the origins, development and current trends in Black Theatre. It will focus on the basic concepts, creations, methods of operation, and artistic contributions of Black Americans to the theatre of Western Civilization and the theatre of Black America. It will also include an in-depth study of the significance and results connected with the selected deletion of the Black American contribution to the development of American theatre and drama. Representative plays from the Black theatre will be explored through lectures, discussions, and interpretive readings. Participation in class and attendance are mandatory as are assignments such as viewing campus theatre productions and other productions in the Ann Arbor area. Four project assignments and several quizzes will also be given in partial fulfillment of the course requirements. Text: The Theatre of Black Americans, ed. by Errol Hill. Cost:1 WL:2,4 (Simmons)

245(345). Introduction to Stage Management. Theatre 250. (2). (Excl).

Class covers methods of stage management including rehearsal coordination, prompt book preparation, record keeping, and director, cast, and crew relationships during the rehearsal period. Students may be assigned as Assistant Stage Manager on a School of Music production (theatre, opera, musical theatre) requiring, during the rehearsal/performance period, approximately 70 hrs. outside of class time. Evaluation is based on class participation, occasional written assignments, and execution of assigned stage management duties. (Uffner)

322/English 444. History of Theatre II. (3). (HU).

A survey of the development of Western Theatre from the end of the 17th century to the mid-20th century. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and societal context. Representative plays are also studied. The course method is a combination of lecture and discussion. Four quizzes, final, one research paper, and one short scene. Texts include History of the Theatre, 7th ed. (Brockett) and Masterpieces of the Drama, 6th ed. (eds. Allison et al). Cost:4 WL:3 (Woods)

345. Stage Management Practicum: Plays. Theatre 245 and permission of instructor. (2-3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 4 credits.

Seminar class covers methods of stage management including rehearsal coordination, prompt book preparation, record keeping, and director, cast, and crew relationships during the rehearsal period. Students will be assigned as Stage Manager on a Theatre Department production requiring, during the rehearsal/performance period, approximately 170 hrs. outside of class time. Evaluation is based on execution of assigned stage management duties. Cost:3 WL:3 (Uffner)

386. Practicum in Performing Arts Management. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Students will gain practical experience in arts administration by assisting in the creation of approximately five productions per term presented under the auspices of the School of Music, including drama, dance, musical theatre, and opera. Students are required to meet "real world" deadlines and to contribute toward meeting actual ticket-sales goals. Administrative assignments include: writing press releases, developing marketing campaigns, creating print and radio ads, assisting in ticket-office operations, managing the house during performances, and analyzing budgets. One and one-half hour class per week is required plus weekly duties according to the particular production. Theatre 385 is a suggested prerequisite (or concurrently), or previous backstage experience. Students who are interested in all types of performing arts are welcome. Cost:1 WL:3 (Kuras)

399. Topics in Drama. (1-3). (Excl).
Section 001 American Women Playwrights. (3 credits).
(Jones)

Section 002 Commedia dell'arte Workshop. (3 credits). This course will be a practical workshop in the Italian, masked improvisational comedy known as the commedia dell'arte. A product of popular culture in the Renaissance, the commedia dell'arte flourished for two hundred years, inspiring Molière among others, and it continues to influence contemporary drama (San Francisco Mime Troupe, Dario Fo, the "New Vaudevilleans," etc.). We will study this theatre-historical phenomenon, chiefly through Duchartre's richly illustrated text, The Italian Comedy, and proceed to practical exercises with the principal character masks: Pantalone, il Dottore, Arlecchino, Brighella, il Capitano, Pulcinella as well as the Lovers (Inamoratti), male and female. Each student will take on one or more of these character-types creating a particular voice and body language, developing set speeches, jokes, and "lines of business" (lazzi), and exploring the dynamics of the masks' interaction. Reproducing the performance conditions of a small travelling troupe, we will realize a portion of a period scenario as an end-of-term, totally improvisational performance, most likely outdoors. Other texts: Flaminio Scala's Scenarios of the Commedia dell'arte; Mel Gordon's Lazzi; and John Rudlin's Commedia dell'arte: An Actor's Handbook. WL:5, Entry by interview/audition only. (Walsh)

445. Stage Management Practicum: Opera and Musicals. Theatre 245. (2-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 4 credits.

Seminar class covers methods of stage management including rehearsal coordination, prompt book preparation, record keeping, and director, cast, and crew relationships during the rehearsal period. Students will be assigned as Stage Manager on a School of Music production (opera or musical theatre) requiring, during the rehearsal/performance period, approximately 170 hrs. outside of class time. Evaluation is based on execution of assigned stage management duties. Cost:3 WL:3 (Uffner)


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