Late Winter Term 1997 Course Descriptions


December 12, 1996


Anthropology

Cultural 101. Introduction to Anthropology.
Primarily for freshmen and sophomores. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 222 or 426. (4). (SS). (This course meets the Race and Ethnicity Requirement).
Section 200. (Honors).
This Honors seminar introduces anthropology's modes of inquiry and its four subfields (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic) through the examination of theoretical problems and ethnographic examples which illuminate anthropology's principles of analysis. We will highlight the connections between the study of human history and conceptions of science, and will examine anthropology as a socially situated endeavor which addresses contending beliefs about the nature of human life. Our emphasis will be on the cultural dimension of issues, and our focus will be on race, gender, and conflict and their relationship to situations of colonialism and inequalities of power. Our aim is to develop the capacity to think critically about human variability and cultural transformation, and the ability to use an anthropological approach to consider contemporary questions, such as, what is a family?; is intelligence innate?; are people naturally violent? The course will be based on the critical discussion of the materials by the members of the class. The materials include two ethnographies, articles, and films. Students are asked to write three papers on class materials and a fieldwork report on their own research, as well as short comments on the readings. There are no exams. (Skurski)

458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits.
Section 003 The Cultural Politics of Colonialism.
This seminar offers an overview of anthropological approaches to the colonial encounter, focusing on the cultural representations and political economy of European rule in Asia, Africa, and South America. It examines the historical processes by which the categories of "colonizer" and "colonized" have been created and contested by looking at the gender politics, racial thinking, and class visions which informed how these categories were applied. We will explore the changing interface between anthropological knowledge and colonial power by tracing how anthropology has been shaped by and has shaped different colonial encounters. Attention will be given to how colonial relations have given rise to notions of "First" and "Third World," and ultimately figured in setting the terms of debates on "cultural diversity," cultural racism and the geopolitics of cultural imperialism today. (Stoler)

College Honors

252. Sophomore Seminar.
Open to Honors students. (3). (NS).
Section 002 Introduction to Global Change: Human Impacts.
Global change encompasses any of the processes of biosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, oceans, and human societies which affect, and are affected by the global environment. The term global change includes both the causes as well as the impacts of change on human populations and the environment. such impacts may directly alter global processes, as with climate change, or they may accumulate indirectly at discrete and local levels, as with the growth of deserts. The human systems and the non-human environmental systems meet both where humans directly alter the environment and where environmental change directly affects and alters human activities and values. Course grade will be based on midterm exam and final exam, plus successful completion of the required weekly laboratory exercises. There are no prerequisites for this course and no science background is assumed. The course is appropriate for all first year students, irrespective of intended major. NOTE: This is a three (3) credit course. Students must also add Honors 290 for one (1) credit for the computer lab. (Killeen)


Germanic Languages and Literatures

German
326. Intermediate German. German 325. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 Deutsche Politik.
The aim of this course is to introduce the poetics and society of modern Germany. In the beginning, a brief overview on the German political history is given starting with the Deutsche Reichsgruendung (1871) and ending with the Deutsche Wiedervereinigung in 1989. While this is meant to develop a rough historic skeleton for orientation in later topical sessions, the focus of the course is analytical rather than historical. This analytical focus has four broad directions: (1) the profound change in the social structure with particular Emphasis on the structure of employment, the educational expansion, the confessional divide and the process of secularization. (2) the changing system of interest intermediation, or political linkage, with particular Emphasis on the origins and development of political parties and party systems; (3) the changing German political culture with a particular focus on political orientations/values and political participation, including participation in elections; and (4) the integration of Germany into the European Union and questions and problems and perspectives associated with it. The course will be taught in German. (Schmitt)

Section 002 Franz Kafka: Short Stories. Letters and Diary. A book, Kafka thought, must be like an ax for the frozen sea in us. Under the surface of his crystal- clear language, our understanding of the world is constantly questioned. No presuppositions resist his expression. The only truth in words is the pain we feel when they are engraved into our bodies. Kafka is not only a major novelist but a brilliant writer of short stories. We will discover some of his most famous and most puzzling, such as: <<Ein Landarzt>>, <<Eine kaiserliche Botschaft>>, <<In der Strafkolonie>> and <<Ein Hungerkünstler>>. A selection from his diaries and letters will also form part of our readings. The active participants of this seminar will have ample opportunity to express themselves orally as well as in writing and gain a better command of spoken and written German. (Fridrich)

German 449. Special Topics in English Translation. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.
Section 002 Classical Bodies: Limbs of Stone and Eyes of Fire (Readings in 18th century Greek Revival).
Today nobody gets excited about Greek statues. In the eighteenth century however, the marble remains of a long-lost culture were looked at with enthusiasm and passion. Before they became cold and sterile museum pieces, the Greek statues dispensed heat from within their core. Bodies caught in liquid plaster, they were so sensual that only a divine idea could have conceived the Only a creative mind could comprehend their beauty. Before entering the classicist canon, the Greek statues were objects of erotic contemplation. How is it that German artists and thinkers became so thoroughly obsessed with Greek art? How is it that one culture speaks so powerful to another over such a vast expanse of time? Our readings will include poetry, extracts of literary prose writing, aesthetic pamphlets, and letters to the editors of learned magazines. We will gain insight into one of the greatest period German literature: classicism. The active participants of this seminar will have ample opportunity to express themselves oral as well as in writing and gain a higher command of spoken and written German. (Fridrich)

Music History and Musicology

347. Opera of the Past and Present.
For non-School of Music students only. (3). (Excl).

This is a lecture survey dealing with selected operas from 1600 to the present. The case studies discussed will be representative of works frequently performed today. Normally we discuss several opera composers each week, students being asked to see videos of selected scenes, to hear audio cassettes, and to do selected readings from periodical literature. Readings and discussions will take varied approaches, considering operas as music compositions, as show pieces for voices, as samples of literature, and as cultural icons. Translations are provided for any works in foreign languages. Students will also be urged to attend an opera performance and to write a paper describing the experience as a personal experience reflecting social cultural, and aesthetic issues. Grades will be determined by two hour exams and a final exam. No musical background necessary. (D. Crawford)

Near Eastern Studies

Arabic, Persian, Turkish and Islamic Studies 593. Mini Course - Topics in APTIS.
(1). (Excl).
Section 001 The Early History of the Translation and Interpretation of the Qur'an into the European Vernacular Languages.
Provides a critical examination Provides a critical study of selected English texts dealing with the translation of the Qur'an and the interpretation of the history and practices of Islam from 17th century to modern times. Through an examination of the various approaches and by Western scholars who have adopted a "scientific approach" to the study of religion. The format of the course consists of lectures, demonstration and discussion based on a course packet. Requirements include regular attendance, participation in discussion and a short term paper. (Ibrahim)

HJCS 302(Hebrew 402). Advanced Hebrew, II. HJCS 301. (3). (Excl).

This is the second term of the third-year course within the Hebrew language sequence at the University of Michigan. As such, it constitutes a transitional stage from the lower levels in which the concern is with learning the introductory grammar and acquisition of functional vocabulary to the more advanced levels in which we will focus on the more complex linguistic structures. At this level we will treat original texts which will serve as the jumping off point for in-class discussion and the basis for composition of essays at home. The goal is to expose the student to a wide range of texts as a window unto "the Israeli Experience". We will be using the book me-ta'amah shel sifrut (ed. Ora Mayroz), but, in addition, will be treating journalistic texts and children's literature. The course will incorporate other communications media, e.g., material recorded on audio tape, video clips and multi-media. Requirements for the course include regular assignments, midterm and final exam, presentation and compilation of journal. In consideration of the varying levels of Hebrew proficiency among the students, the final grade will be based on individual effort and progress. For more information, please contact the instructor, Marc Bernstein, during (tel. 763 1595) or via e-mail (marcsb@umich.edu). (Bernstein)

Political Science

443. Selected Topics in Western European Politics.
Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.
Section 001 Political Culture and National Identity in Germany.
For Winter Term, 1997, this course is offered jointly with German 449.001. (Thaa)

495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory. Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.
Section 003 Television and American Politics.
This seminar surveys the various ways some good, some not so good that television has altered and influenced contemporary American politics. The course will proceed as a seminar: students will be expected to do the reading and come prepared each week to discuss it. Grades will depend on the quality and volume of class participation and a 20-page paper, due at the end of the term. Cost:2 WL:1 (Kinder)

Psychology

114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.
Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, 113, or 115. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (SS). Students in Psychology 114 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.
Section 002.
This course is designed to help you gain a broad overview of psych, apply psyc concepts to yourself and others and think critically and creatively about the material covered. I will emphasize active learning which includes group activities, class discussion, journals, and films. Final grade will be based on a research paper, a final paper, and 3 short "thought" papers. This section will be most enjoyable for students who are self-motivated and like to learn concepts in creative ways. (Nagel)

120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science. Open only to first-year students. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Section 002 Tracing the Evolution of Psychoanalysis over the Past 100 Years.
This course examines the antecedents of psychoanalysis; Freud's aspirations to develop a psychology of the mind which could hold its own among the other rapidly developing sciences of his day; Freud's important detour into neurology, followed shortly by a sharp break with neurology as he turned instead to the study of hypnosis; the discovery of the "dynamic unconscious" as he tried to find a way to cure himself of his own troubling neuroses; several sharp twists and turns he took as he explored the applicability of his theory to sociological, cultural, linguistic and philosophical issues, which fed back into and further enriched his clinical theory. (Mayman)


303. Special Problems in Psychology: Advanced Laboratory. One of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (2-4). (Excl).
Section 003 Personality and Daily Activities.
This is an experiential Lab course which will involve the students as both experimenters and subjects. The focus will be on personality, and students will be expected to write a final paper on this topic. Students will also be taking a broad sampling of questionnaires, and so will learn about their own personalities in this course. Part of the course will involve having the students keep daily records of their activies, their daily health, and how they spend their time over a six week period. Students will be graded on the basis of completion of assignments and a final paper. Weekly homework will consist mainly of completing questionnaires or attending laboratory sessions. (Larsen)


305. Practicum in Psychology. Introductory psychology. A total of 6 credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 005 Practicum in Child Development and Child Care. (2-4 credits).
This course allows students to acquire experience working in a child care setting with preschool age children. Students will be assigned to specific classrooms and work under the direct supervision of the head teacher and director of the Pound House Children's Center. Students are required to keep a weekly journal summarizing their experiences in the child care setting as well as integrating these experiences with literature on children's development. Students will be required to read the Staff Handbook for information on Center policies as well as independent readings on child development. All students must show evidence of a negative TB tine test and have a physical exam from a doctor stating that there is no reason why they cannot work with young children. Contact Carolyn Tyson at Pound House (747-2204) for further information. Course registration is by permission of instructor only. Cost:1 WL:5. Students need to meet with the instructor to gain approval for course registration. (Volling)

Romance Languages and Literatures

Italian 112. Second Special Reading Course.
Italian 111. (4). (Excl).

Italian 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a thorough reading knowledge of the language. Advanced reading of critical materials in the student's field of specialization, designed to teach translating skills. All of the basic grammar of the languageis covered and reading of both fictional and critical materials is required. Open to graduates, and undergraduates and to others by special permission. For graduate students, a grade of B or better in Italian 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirements for the doctorate. Italian 111 and 112 may not be used to satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement. Italian 112 is a continuation of Italian 111 and open ONLY to students who have completed Italian 111. Class and Tutorial.

Spanish 112. Second Special Reading Course. Spanish 111. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors, and seniors, and to others by special permission. For graduate students a grade of B or better in Spanish 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for the doctorate.

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Russian
455. Russian Poetry from 1840 to 1900. Thorough knowledge of Russian. (3). (Excl).

Close reading of Russian poets from Lermontov to Bunin. Discussion of major literary trends and polemics. Two papers, a midterm and final. A course pack will be available. (Humesky)

Russian 452/RC Hums. 452. Survey of Russian Literature. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

This course, a continuation of Russian 451, gives an account of some of the major developments in Russian prose and drama in the last third of the nineteenth century. While particular attention is given to questions of literary analysis, individual works are studied in the context of history and politics of the period, and against the background of general currents of literature. Tolstoi's ANNA KARENINA, Dostoevskii's BROTHERS KARAMAZOV, and the major plays and prose of Chekhov are among the works studied. Class discussion is encouraged. There are two take home examinations, and a take home final. A paper is required of graduates, Russian concentrators, and RC students. Optional for others. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (Mersereau)

Slavic Surveys 490. Culture and Politics in Russia Today. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of four credits.
The focus in this course will be on translation from Russian to English. Questions of phraseology, syntax and lexical choice will be discussed. In addition, certain features of Russian grammar and stylistics, such as the use of participles, verb aspect, and conditional, will be reviewed. A course pack will be provided. (Humesky)


Sociology

102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology.
Open to freshpersons and sophomores. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 302, 303, 400, 401, 423, 444, 447, 450, 460, or 461. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.
Section 001 Introduction to Sociology Through Social History.
This course examines key developments in American Society since World War II. It uses them as a basis for exploring the interplay of social structure, politics and culture in shaping patterns of class and status, power and authority, ethnicity and race relations, gender roles, community and social change. Selected issues highlighted include: the ideology of the "Cold War", and McCarthyism, the changing American Presidency, the Civil Rights and Women's movements, the War in Vietnam, liberal stasis and the challenge of the "New Right," deindustrialization and the problem of scarcity, and rise of religious fundamentalism . (Vogel)

111/UC 111/AOSS 172/NR&E 111. Introduction to Global Change II.
No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

See UCourses 111. (Killeen, Allan, Abreu)

Theatre and Drama

330. Contemporary American Women Playwrights.
(3). (HU).

Particular emphasis will be placed on exploring dramatic language, performance styles, cultural, history, and the impact the work of these playwrights has on the American theatre and drama landscape. A central technique in the exploration of these works will be script-in-hand scenes from each of the plays. The scenes are prepared by class members and presented in class for discussion.

University Courses

111/Soc. 111/AOSS 172/NR&E 111. Introduction to Global Change II. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).
Section 001 Human Impacts.
Topics Include: What is global change?; The forcing functions; biophysical consequences; impact on humans; national and international initiatives. Global Change encompasses any of the processes of the biosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, oceans, and human societies which affect, and are affected by, the global environment. The term "global change" includes both the causes as well as the impacts of change on human populations and the environment. Such impacts may directly alter global processes, as with climate change, or they may accumulate indirectly at discrete and local levels, as with the growth of deserts. The human systems and the non-human environmental systems meet both where humans directly alter the environment and where environmental change directly affects and alters activities and values. There are no prerequisites for this course and no science background is assumed. Three hours lecture and one two-hour lab section each week. Tim Killeen (AOSS), David Allan (SNRE), Vincent Abreu (AOSS)



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