Germanic Languages and Literatures


Courses in Dutch (Division 357)

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 512. (4). (LR).

This course, a continuation of 111, proceeds with the basics of the Dutch language. We will primarily use the monolingual text, Code Nederlands, in which each lesson consists of an everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a comprehensive vocabulary list of one topic, questions about the conversation, homework, and a special computer exercise. To enliven the class, the teacher will present the students with a variety of texts, music, video, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. Cost:3 WL:3 (Broos)

232. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 231 or the equivalent. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 532. (4). (LR).

This course, a continuation of Dutch 231, will further examine the particular difficulties and subtleties of Dutch conversation and style. Grammatical items introduced in previous courses will be reviewed where necessary. Introduction to contemporary Dutch society by means of songs, video, comics, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course, which will be conducted mostly in Dutch. Required text: Code Nederlands, volume 2. Cost:1 WL:3 (Broos)

492. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 Anne Frank in Past and Present.
The first part of this course will deal with the history of Anne Frank in the Netherlands, her hiding and arrest, her famous diary, its popularity, and the attacks on its authenticity. In the second part of the course we will look at the holocaust, as portrayed in other accounts, diaries, stories, and films, with special emphasis on survivors and their problems, children of survivors, etc. Although some of the literary examples will be taken from the Dutch, all literature will be read in English and the course will be conducted in English. Requirements are summaries of given articles, a midterm, a short oral presentation, a final paper on a chosen subject, regular class attendance, and participation in class discussions. Suggested reading: Anne Frank, (The Diary). Cost:2 WL:2 (Broos)

495. Topics in Dutch Literature. Dutch 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course will examine prose and poetry of both the Netherlands and Belgium. Issues such as the influence of the Second World War, feminist writing, Dutch Indies Literature are among the many topics that will provide the students with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and point of view of (modern) Dutch literature. The course will be conducted in Dutch. Cost:1 (Broos)


German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. All students with prior classwork in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Please Note: the structure of the beginning German courses has radically changed. All day-time sections meet collectively for a single hourly lecture once a week (On Mondays 12-1). Hourly recitation sections meet for three hours a week (Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays; no class on Fridays). You must be concurrently enrolled in the lecture section and a recitation section.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels and in all spheres of the language acquisition process. The unique combination of a weekly group lecture and individual hourly recitation sections is intended to ensure that the coursework corresponds to the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners.

The weekly lecture period is devoted to chapter quizzes and presentation of basic points of grammar, as well as linguistic and analytic strategies. Students learn not only the German language itself, but also about language and the language learning process more generally. During the weeks in which there are no chapter quizzes, a portion of the lecture period includes presentations on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, and literature. Thus, students are presented with the immediate intellectual applications of their foreign language study and are prepared to take advantage of the developing language opportunities at the U of M, such as the specialty 232 courses, LAC courses, and the expanding German Studies program. In the recitation sessions (meeting on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays) students practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term students have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and are able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations. Students develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. Cost:2 WL:1

The night section (M Th 7-9) will be coordinated with, but taught separately from the day sections, which will allow non-traditional night students to be able to attend both evening lecture and recitation sections.

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Please Note: the structure of the beginning German courses has radically changed. All day-time sections meet collectively for a single hourly lecture once a week (Either on Mondays 12-1 or on Mondays 2-3). Hourly recitation sections meet for three hours a week (Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays; no class on Fridays). You must be concurrently enrolled in the lecture section and a recitation section.

German 102 completes the two-term sequence of Michigan's innovative introductory German language program. The course continues to focus systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels and in all spheres of the language acquisition process. The unique combination of a weekly group lecture and individual hourly recitation sections is intended to ensure that the coursework corresponds to the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners.

The weekly lecture period is devoted to chapter tests and presentation of basic points of grammar, as well as linguistic and analytic strategies. Students continue to learn not only the German language itself, but also about language and the language learning process more generally. During the weeks in which there are no chapter quizzes, a portion of the lecture period include presentations on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, and literature. Thus, students are presented with the immediate intellectual applications of their foreign language study and are prepared to take advantage of the developing language opportunities at the U of M, such as the specialty 232 courses, LAC courses and the expanding German Studies program. In the recitation sessions (meeting on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays) students practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term students have a firm foundation in the fundamental elements of German grammar and are able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and a number of conversational situations. Students also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and to success in other academic fields. Cost:2 WL:1

The night section (M Th 7-9) will be coordinated with, but taught separately from the day sections, which will allow non-traditional night students to be able to attend both evening lecture and recitation sections.

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 102. (4). (LR).

German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. Although this class focuses intensively on grammar review and vocabulary development, coursework systematically addresses all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) so that students are sufficiently prepared for more advanced university courses both within and outside of the German Department. By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of German texts and conversational situations. Students will also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. Most importantly students will find that studying German in a university setting will not only be intellectually stimulating and fun, but will become useful in a number of ways throughout their academic careers. Cost:2 WL:1

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. Cost:1 WL:1

206. Conversation Practice. German 102 or 103. (1). (Excl).

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you will learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this class may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in German 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year abroad program. Graduates of previous German 305 classes are regretfully debarred from this course. Requirements: constant talking and e-mailing (in German) with the instructor, three oral presentations. (Federhofer)

221. Accelerated Third Semester German. Placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 231. 4 credits granted to those who have completed German 102 or 103. (5). (Excl).

This course combines an intensive review of basic grammar with more advanced practice in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). Substantial emphasis will be placed on providing a firm grammatical base, and on reading, discussing, and writing about authentic German texts from a variety of fields ranging from natural and social science to history, literature, and the arts. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and write about short texts from periodicals and textbooks, and from classic texts by Nietzsche, Kafka, etc., independently, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, three in-class tests, and a final examination. Cost:2 WL:1

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. Reading texts include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, three in-class tests, and a final examination. Instruction is in German and English. Cost:2 WL:1

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). Some sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Second course of a two-term sequence in intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can understand German texts and express themselves in their area of interest. The language of instruction is German. Please note that some sections of this course address special topics and focus on material dealing specifically with these topics. See individual descriptions of the sections for topics and course requirements.

Section 002 Classics of German Literature. In this section we will examine a number of works written by eminent authors during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth century. These include two dramas (one in abridged form), several stories, and a number of poems. While this is not a course in literary history, literary, cultural, and socio-political developments will be touched upon. Texts will be read at a moderate pace so that there is ample opportunity to explore their meanings. In order to enhance the students' understanding of these works and to improve their German class participation will be encouraged. To that same end a fair amount of writing will be integral to the course. (Weiss)

Section 003 The German Conception of History. This special theme section explores the problem of History in modern German culture. Modern historical science emerged in German-language Europe in the nineteenth century, and its development was linked to the process of nation-building particular to Germany. Today, too, discussions of German politics, national identity, and culture are saturated with the "problem" of recent German history, in particular the shadow of the Nazi past. In this course we will explore the language of German history as it moved through various stages: Romantic notions of the Volk community; the link between emergent German 'historicism' and the conservative ideal of the authoritarian State, Nietzsche's dramatic repudiation of historicism right up through the fiery public "Historians' Debate" of the 1980s about the significance of the Holocaust and the right of the Germans to a "normal" history. We will work through a number of short texts to produce this broad picture of the language of German history from the birth of nationalism to German reunification. Students will work through the texts with the assistance of a computer module which will help make connections between the texts and also provide glossary definitions, maps and timelines, visual and audio-visual sources, and workbook exercises. This innovative project has been supported by the University Instructional Technologies Division. Cost:1 WL:1

Section 004 Contemporary German Society. This section will explore contemporary geographic, economic, social, political, and cultural aspects of Germany. We will start at the end of World War II with the two German states putting special emphasis on the period since the Reunification of 1990. These aspects of Germany will be highlighted by special consideration of the situation of the foreigners who have come to Germany since shortly after the end of WW II, first as guest workers (Gastarbeiter) and later as refugees and asylum seekers ("Fl¸chtlinge und Asylanten"). We will examine various genres and media presentations such as prose, film, poetry, newspaper and magazine articles, radio plays, and television. Students will watch and report on a number of television news reports from Deutsche Welle. Students will also write a number of essays and three exams. Grammar will be reviewed according to the needs of the class. The language of instruction is German. Cost:1 WL:1 (VanValkenburg)

Sections 006 and 010 Mathematical and Scientific German. In this course we will spend several weeks each reading, discussing, and actually doing some basic Math, Computer, Physics, Astronomy, and Biology work in German (just as Einstein learned to do these things in English...). The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. This should be easier than it perhaps sounds, because the technical terms are usually very similar in German and English, and there is a clear context for guessing the meaning of unknown words. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, and exams. Cost:1 WL:1

Section 008 Topics in Music: Mozart and the Magic Flute. Reading of the libretto in German, singing and contingent on proficiency of the course participants playing of musical highlights from The Magic Flute. In addition to readings in German on highlights in the biographies of Mozart and Magic Flute librettist Immanuel Schickaneder, and on the cultural and historical background of the work's origin, there will be guest lecturers and performers (musicologists, stage technicians, musicians, specialists in Viennese culture) demonstrating, some of them in a "hands-on" fashion, their expertise in the work in German, of course. Student evaluation based on performance in class participation, regular grammar exercises, essays, oral presentations, and final exam. Prerequisite: German 231 or equivalent (there are no musical prerequisites for the course). Cost:1 WL:4 (Bailey)

Section 009 Contemporary German Society: Post-Unification German Society. This class will begin with a review of the events which led up to the unification of Germany, and will then move on to discuss specific issues in post-unification German society (such as the dismantling of the East German secret police, legal and electoral changes, and the increase in violence toward foreigners). We will learn about and discuss the facts surrounding these issues, but the main goal of the class will be to understand the emotional impact of unification on both eastern and western Germans as it is revealed in these issues. Reading assignments will be contained in a course pack, and will consist of both magazine articles (primarily from 'der Spiegel') and literature (short stories, excerpts from novels, and poetry). Grades will be based on class participation, short writing assignments, a midterm, a final, and a three-page final paper. (Dailey-O'Cain)

Section 010 Mathematical and Scientific German. See German 232.006.

306. Conversation Practice. German 232. (1). (Excl).

Students entering this stage of the German conversation-cycle do not need to have taken German 305. This class harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a German 325 (or higher) class. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to appreciate fully the life in German-speaking communities. In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements. (Federhofer)

326. Intermediate German. German 325. (3). (Excl).

May be taken before or after 325. This course is designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German. Up to one third of class time will be spent on grammar review and a weekly composition provides the opportunity to practice grammatical rules and to develop stylistic flexibility. Class activities are informal and varied, but German is used throughout the meetings. There will be ample opportunity for group discussions as well as for brief presentations by each student. Audio and video tapes will be used repeatedly during the term. Cost:1 WL:1

Section 001 Deutsche Politik. The aim of this course is to introduce the poetics and society of modern Germany. In the beginning, a brief overview on the German political history is given starting with the Deutsche Reichsgruendung (1871) and ending with the Deutsche Wiedervereinigung in 1989. While this is meant to develop a rough historic skeleton for orientation in later topical sessions, the focus of the course is analytical rather than historical. This analytical focus has four broad directions: (1) the profound change in the social structure with particular Emphasis on the structure of employment, the educational expansion, the confessional divide and the process of secularization. (2) the changing system of interest intermediation, or political linkage, with particular Emphasis on the origins and development of political parties and party systems; (3) the changing German political culture with a particular focus on political orientations/values and political participation, including participation in elections; and (4) the integration of Germany into the European Union and questions and problems and perspectives associated with it. The course will be taught in German. (Schmitt)

Section 002 Franz Kafka: Short Stories. Letters and Diary. A book, Kafka thought, must be like an ax for the frozen sea in us. Under the surface of his crystal- clear language, our understanding of the world is constantly questioned. No presuppositions resist his expression. The only truth in words is the pain we feel when they are engraved into our bodies. Kafka is not only a major novelist but a brilliant writer of short stories. We will discover some of his most famous and most puzzling, such as: <<Ein Landarzt>>, <<Eine kaiserliche Botschaft>>, <<In der Strafkolonie>> and <<Ein Hungerk¸nstler>>. A selection from his diaries and letters will also form part of our readings. The active participants of this seminar will have ample opportunity to express themselves orally as well as in writing and gain a better command of spoken and written German. (Fridrich)

382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German dramas of the 19th and 20th centuries. These dramas reflect not only the main literary but also the significant cultural and political trends of the period. In conjunction with German 381, 383, 384, or 385, this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of individual plays, but the instructor will include some biographical, literary and historical background. The texts are by Hauptmann, Schnitzler, Kaiser, Brecht, D¸rrenmatt, and Frisch. The major language is German, but not exclusively. A term paper will be assigned. It may be in English. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. Cost:1 WL:2 (Cowen)

385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German short stories and novellas of the twentieth century, from the periods before and between the world wars (Mann and Kafka) to recent prose fiction (Grass). In conjunction with German 381, 382, 383, or 384, this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of the individual works but some historical and literary background material will be included. The texts read in recent terms were by Kafka, Mann, Musil, Boll, D¸rrenmatt, and Grass. The major language is German, but not exclusively. Two short interpretive papers will be assigned for the term; they may be in English or German. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. Cost:1 WL:4 (Paslick)

406. Conversation Practice. German 305 or 306. (1). (Excl).

No katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a resume and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities. The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This class is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this class. (Federhofer)

426. Advanced German. German 326. (3). (Excl).

Various approaches will be utilized to improve the students' proficiency. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape or watch a videocassette concerning the history or culture of the German-speaking countries in order to use it as a departure point for a composition or a discussion. Readings include articles of topical interest, interviews, stories, and poems. Class members are expected to give brief presentations and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on composition as well as class participation. German will be used exclusively in this class. Cost:1 WL:5, Call the instructor at 663-9673. (Weiss)

492. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber. (Rast)

499. Seminar in German Studies. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 Doing Business in German: Advanced German for the Business Professions.
The goals of German 499 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four skills in Business German, as well as to familiarize the participants with Germany's business practices. The course will be divided into blocks such as Business Communication, cultural awareness, and the German system of doing business. The course will emphasize business opportunities and Germany's role in world trade. The materials for the course are text, newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. One research paper will be required during the course, as well as an oral presentation on the findings. Grades will be based on the paper, the oral report, tests, final exam, and class participation. The course is conversation-oriented and will be conducted in German. Prerequisite: 2-3 years of university-level German or permission of instructor. Qualified undergraduates as well as graduates are welcome. Cost:1 WL:1,4 (VanValkenburg)

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

330. German Cinema. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($12) required.
Section 001 German Cinema: Classic Literature and Classic Films.
Award-winning films have been based on novels and plays by leading modern German writers including Thomas Mann, Heinrich Mann, G¸nter Grass, Robert Musil, Theodor Fontane, and Frank Wedekind (author of the lurid "Lulu" plays). Some of the literary texts and films still have a shock value today. We will read and discuss a selection of literary works, view the associated films, and take a comparative, critical look at the two media and their distinctive narrative shapes. We will ask questions such as what happens to the "original" at the hands of the film director? Along the way we will pick up a good deal of information about the social and political history of modern Germany. No prerequisites. Readings and discussions are in English. The requirements are a film journal, midterm, and two essays. (Greenberg)

417/Anthro. 476/Ling. 417. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics. Ling. 411 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

See Linguistics 417. (Milroy)

449. Special Topics in English Translation. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Section 001 Political Culture and National Identity in Germany. Due to the catastrophic course of German history, Germany has always been of special interest in the studying of political culture. The course will introduce students to the general concept of political culture. It will then examine characteristic traits of a German political culture and its development during the late 19th and the 20th century. Special emphasis will be laid on different definitions of the nation and the nation-state. We will also discuss more recent aspects of the political culture in Germany, including topics such as "Dealing with the Nazi Past," "Multiculturalism," "Unification," and the "New East-West Division." The language of instruction will be English. German reading ability will be helpful, but is not required. (Thaa)

Section 002 Classical Bodies: Limbs of Stone and Eyes of Fire (Readings in 18th century Greek Revival). Today nobody gets excited about Greek statues. In the eighteenth century however, the marble remains of a long-lost culture were looked at with enthusiasm and passion. Before they became cold and sterile museum pieces, the Greek statues dispensed heat from within their core. Bodies caught in liquid plaster, they were so sensual that only a divine idea could have conceived the Only a creative mind could comprehend their beauty. Before entering the classicist canon, the Greek statues were objects of erotic contemplation. How is it that German artists and thinkers became so thoroughly obsessed with Greek art? How is it that one culture speaks so powerful to another over such a vast expanse of time? Our readings will include poetry, extracts of literary prose writing, aesthetic pamphlets, and letters to the editors of learned magazines. We will gain insight into one of the greatest period German literature: classicism. The active participants of this seminar will have ample opportunity to express themselves oral as well as in writing and gain a higher command of spoken and written German. (Fridrich)


Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (4). (LR).

Second-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish, up to a level of Swedish 103. The emphasis is placed on developing communicative language skills, both written and oral, review and extension of basic grammar. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The textbook will be supplemented by newspaper articles, a children's book, some Swedish poems, etc. The instruction will principally be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 103 or the equivalent for entry into 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

234. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 233. (4). (LR).

Fourth-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish up to a level of Swedish 233. The emphasis is placed on further developing on both oral and written communicative language skills, review and extension of Swedish grammar, Swedish literature and Swedish civics (history, politics, traditions, etc.) Extracts from Swedish novels, poems, newspaper articles, and documentary articles will be used. The class will also read and discuss a Swedish novel. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed. All instruction will be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation.

Students needing Swedish 233 or the equivalent for entry into 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

430. Colloquium in Scandinavian Literature. Reading knowledge of Swedish. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.
Section 001 Sweden Today in Film and Literature.
For students with two years of Swedish (Elementary and Second-Year Swedish) or the equivalent. All writing, reading and talking will be in Swedish. We will watch Swedish films, and read modern Swedish fiction from the same countries as bases for oral and written analyses and for classroom discussions. We will look at the picture and image of Sweden that these films and texts give us, and compare it with the "real life" that is presented to us through magazines and newspapers. Grades will be based on class participation, written assignments, and oral presentations. The teacher is a native speaker from Sweden. Cost:1 WL:1 (Olvegård)


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