Near Eastern Studies


Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies (APTIS) (Division 325)

100(GNE 100/101)/ACABS 100/HJCS 100/Hist. 132. Peoples of the Middle East. (4). (HU).
This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (=3000 BCE) to Khomeini's Iran (1979 CE). The lectures, the readings, the visuals are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of peoples who throughout history lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, a region generally referred to as the Middle East. Cost:2 WL:3 (Walker)
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102(Arabic 102). Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II. APTIS 101. (4). (LR). Laboratory fee ($10) required.
In APTIS 102, the focus on acquisition of the basic vocabulary and fundamental structures of Arabic is continued through grammar presentations, and oral and written practice based on short readings including simple news items, narration, and description. There is increased emphasis on developing conversational, reading, and writing skills as well as focus on communicative drills and activities involving student-teacher, student-student, and group interactions. Daily written assignments are required involving short descriptions and narration utilizing vocabulary and structures covered in class. Grades are based on class participation, weekly achievement tests, periodic comprehensive tests, and a final exam including an oral component. Textbooks: Abboud et al., (1) Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Part One (Lessons 11-20) and (2) a course pack including supplementary vocabulary and achievement tests. Cost:1 WL:3
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104(Arabic 222/202). Intensive Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, II. APTIS 103 or 102. (6). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.
This course is especially recommended for students concentrating in Arabic or those who expect to use Arabic. The primary goals of this course are to have students develop the ability: (1) to communicate/speak Arabic with native speakers of Arabic on familiar topics; (2) to understand familiar spoken Arabic; (3) to read and understand the specific content of an elementary level; and (4) to communicate in writing and provide correct responses within the scope of the content of this course. This course is taught in Arabic using a communicative approach emphasizing the use of language. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, written assignments, tests and quizzes, and a final exam. Required text: Peter Abboud et al., Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Part I Lessons 16-30 and course pack including supplementary vocabulary and achievement tests. Cost:2 WL:3 (Farghaly)
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142(Iranian 202). Elementary Persian, II. APTIS 141. (4). (LR).
This course is the continuation of Elementary Persian 141. All four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) will be emphasized. The class will be conducted in Persian with occasional recourse to English for grammatical explanations. There will be daily assignments and in-class conversation groups. By the end of the term, students will have acquired an adequate knowledge of all major points of Persian grammar. They will be able to conduct simple conversations in Persian, read non-technical simple prose, and write passages on a variety of topics. Grading will be based on attendance, homework, quizzes, a midterm and final examination. Incoming students may join the class pending examination and approval by the instructor.
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152(Turkish 202). Elementary Turkish, II. APTIS 151. (4). (LR).
This course is the sequel to APTIS 151 and is the second half of Elementary Turkish. We will focus on speaking and writing the language of modern Turkey. Course topics include the phonological structure of Turkish, basic sentence patterns, and basic vocabulary. The aural-oral approach is emphasized and serves as the basic course format. There are tapes which accompany the text, Turkish for Foreigners. Student evaluation is based on written and oral quizzes, and a final examination. Cost:1 WL:3 (Stewart-Robinson)
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172(Slavic 172)/Armenian 172. Western Armenian, II. APTIS 171. (4). (LR).
A continuation of Western Armenian I. Reading, writing, and speaking are equally emphasized. Homework assignments and listening to tapes on a regular basis, frequent short tests, and a final examination required. Overall performance throughout the year/term and in the final examination, and compliance with requirements will determine the grade. Cost:1 (Bardakjian)
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182(Slavic 182)/Armenian 182. Eastern Armenian, II. APTIS 181. (4). (Excl).
A continuation of Eastern Armenian I. Reading, writing, and speaking are equally emphasized. Homework assignments, frequent short tests, and a final examination are required. Overall performance throughout the year/term and in the final examination, and compliance with requirements will determine the grade. Cost:1 (Bardakjian)
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202(Arabic 202/232). Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, II. APTIS 201 or 104. (4). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.
Primary goals are to have students develop the ability (1) to communicate/speak in Arabic with native speakers of Arabic on familiar topics, (2) to understand familiar spoken Arabic, (3) to read and understand specific content on an intermediate level, and (4) to communicate in writing and provide correct responses within the scope of the content of this course. This course is taught in Arabic using a communicative approach. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, written assignments, tests and quizzes, and a final exam. Required text: Abboud et al., Elementary Modern Standard Arabic Part Two, and supplementary vocabulary and achievement tests. WL:3
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242(Iranian 402). Intermediate Persian, II. APTIS 241. (4). (LR).
This course is a continuation of Persian 241. The emphasis will be increasingly on reading, composition, and dialogue with the objective of achieving intermediate competency. The two main textbooks are Windfuhr-Bostanbakhsh, Modern Persian, Intermediate Level, I, and Windfuhr, Modern Persian, Intermediate Level II. Additional material include tapes and videos. Special needs or interests of the students will be taken into consideration. (Windfuhr)
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252(Turkish 402). Intermediate Turkish, II. APTIS 251. (4). (LR).
Part of the departmental sequence in modern Turkish. The course is designed for students who have completed APTIS 251 or its equivalent as determined by the instructor. It provides further study of Turkish grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Comprehension and oral and written expression will be developed through translations and compositions. Readings will be emphasized. Evaluation will be determined on the basis of class quizzes and performance, or a midterm and final examination. Books cost $20.00 if not already purchased for fall term. (Stewart-Robinson)
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262(GNE 204)/Rel. 204. Introduction to Islam. (4). (HU).
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Islam as a religious tradition. After examining the fundamental sources of Islam, particularly the Qur'an and the reports about the activities and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, we will discuss how these foundations gave rise to the beliefs and practices of Muslims and to an Islamic civilization with spectacular achievements in such areas as law, theology, science, philosophy, and mysticism. Our emphasis will be on the first thousand years of Islam, but modern developments will be covered as well. Quizzes, a midterm, and a final exam. Cost:2 (Jackson)
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331(GNE 330/140). Introduction to Arab Culture and Language. (4). (HU).
This course is designed for undergraduate students who wish to explore social, religious, historical, and linguistic aspects of Arab culture through an exciting collection of videos, lectures, readings, and discussions. It includes an Arabic language component focusing upon Arabic sounds, letters and basic communication needs. There will be an emphasis on developing effective outlining, writing, and oral presentation skills. Evaluation is based on written reports (50%), monthly language tests (20%), term project (20%), and preparation and participation in class discussions (10%). Required text: course pack. Cost:1 (Rammuny)
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381(Arabic 440). Introduction to Arab Literature in Translation. Taught in English. (3). (HU).
Materials in English translation will illustrate the progression of Arabic literary culture from the earliest recorded sources to the present. Lectures and discussion, along with audio-visual materials, will introduce the essentials of the history of the Arabs and the cultural context expressed in their writings. Examination of pre-Islamic poetry will lead to discussion of the religious and historical texts of Islam. The literary legacy of the Caliphal period will be presented. The Arabian Nights will be seen to illustrate the popular culture of the times. Bell-lettrist works and those of the Arab explorers, scientists, and philosophers will be sampled. The contacts between the Arab world and the West in the modern era will be seen to have resulted in new departures in Arabic literature, with the rise of the play, the short story, and the novel. Particular attention will be given to the works of Naguib Mahfouz, the Egyptian winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Students will write a series of short papers commenting upon aspects of the works assigned. Credit will also be given for attendance and for class discussion. A professor of Arabic literature, the instructor is a much-published translator and commentator on Arabic literature. (LeGassick)
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393/ACABS 393/Rel. 393. The Religion of Zoroaster. (3). (HU).
See ACABS 393. (Windfuhr)
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404(Arabic 422/402). Advanced Modern Standard Arabic, II. APTIS 403. (6). (Excl).
This is the second part of a one-year sequence of Modern Standard Arabic whose objectives are to enable the student: (1) to understand main ideas and some details of spoken Standard Arabic discourse involving short stories, descriptions and communicative exchanges; (2) to narrate and describe daily activities using short paragraphs; (3) to read and understand main ideas and factual information band on texts including edited short narration, description and travel; and (4) to write summaries of materials read and discussed in class and narrate and describe in paragraph length. The method of instruction. The method of instruction stresses the four language skills with particular emphasis on oral and written practice based on selected readings taken from various genres of modern prose fiction and non-fiction and A-V cultural materials. The course is conducted in Arabic and meets six hours weekly. Course grade is based on classroom performance, weekly written assignments and quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. Required text: course pack. Cost:1 WL:3 (Farghaly)
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410(Arabic 509). Business Arabic, II. APTIS 409. (4). (LR).
This course is intended for intermediate high and advanced learners who have completed Arabic 202, 404 or higher level courses. It provides a learning context, using authentic business materials, in which the focus is task-oriented. The material includes commercial advertisements, business correspondence, banking documents and transactions, economic circulars, contracts and agreements. It is expected that the student who successfully completes this course will be able to: (1) understand commercials, business reports and commentaries represented orally in Arabic, (2) read and comprehend original Arabic materials dealing with business and trade (correspondence, reports, banking documents, advertisements, contracts, etc.), (3) communicate effectively and appropriately during business discussions and negotiation of contracts, (4) fill out business forms, checks and documents; designed advertisements of various types; write business letters, notes and short reports, and (5) understand and deal effectively with social customs and behavior involved in business practices and negotiations in the Arab world. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, quizzes and tests, and a final exam. Required Text: R. Rammuny, Business Arabic (Advanced level). WL:3 (Rammuny)
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433/Ling. 433. Arabic Syntax and Semantics. APTIS 431, and APTIS 102 or 103. (3). (Excl).
In this course we will look closely at the structure of Modern Standard Arabic and develop phrase structure rules to account for the basic syntactic structures of the language. We will focus on important areas of Arabic syntax such as agreement, PRO Drop and anaphoric relations. We will also look at Arabic within Chomsky's principles and parameters model. Principles of semantic analysis will be explained and a framework for describing the semantics of Arabic will be developed using situation semantics theory. Students will have practical assignments for the analysis of Modern Standard Arabic and will compare it to at least one dialect. The course is conducted in English but it is advisable that students should have at least one year of Arabic and Arabic 431. Course grade is based on practical assignments and three short papers. Required text: Introduction to Government and Binding Theory. (Farghaly)
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452(Turkish 412). Introductory Ottoman Turkish, II. APTIS 451. (3). (Excl).
Second half of first-year Ottoman intended to sharpen skills in the handling of a variety of styles, topics and scripts through the reading and analysis of specially selected texts. Quizzes and a final examination required. Materials cost: less than $10.00 worth of photocopied material. (Stewart-Robinson)
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475(Slavic 419)/Armenian 419. The Old Soul of a New Nation: An Introduction to Soviet Armenian Literature. (3). (Excl).
The establishment in 1920 of the Soviet regime in Eastern Armenia wrought profound changes in an essentially traditional society. The impact of external and internal Soviet policy on Soviet Armenia and on the latter's relations with the Armenian Dispersion, will form the historical background for this course. The main focus will be on the response of earlier and contemporary generations Soviet Armenian writers to the new system, its ideology and its social-cultural tenets and on the consequences of subsequent political and social changes in the Soviet Union in general and Soviet Armenia in particular. Burning issues such as the clash of old and new values; identity and continuity; nationalism, nationhood and political aspirations; and cultural and social concerns will be highlighted through a detailed analysis of the work of major Soviet Armenian literary figures such as E. Charents, A. Bakunts, G. Mahari, M. Armen, P. Sevak, G. Emin, H. Matevosian and others. The formal will be lectures and short discussions. Students will be required to write at least two term-papers in addition to a final examination. English translations of texts will be used and no knowledge of Armenian is required. No prerequisites. (Bardakjian)
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487(GNE 474)/Hist. 443. Modern Middle East History. (3). (Excl).
See History 443. (Cole)
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491. Topics in APTIS. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Section 001 Medical Belief Systems and Religious Healing in Islam.
This course will approach medieval Islamic medicine as a complex of belief systems, some of which continue into the present. Greek-based medical theory regarding the body and health (human anatomy, physiology, and biology), illness (spiritual and physical), diagnostic systems (astrological medicine and augury/scapulomancy), and cures (surgery, diet, drugs, herbalism, spell and talisman magic) will be reviewed. The transmission to the West, and parallels with Christian and Jewish medicine will be discussed. Indigenous Islamic healing beliefs and practices include: (1) Prophetic Medicine (healing prescriptions within the Hadith and the medicinal/magical use of Bedouin herbalism); and (2) Qur'anic healing ("magical" uses of the Qur'an as charms, talismans and amulets, as diagnosis and prognosis of physical/spiritual illness via traditional Islamic "divining" techniques (geomancy, dream divination, and qur'anic divination). Cost:2 (O'Connor)
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531. Reading Modern Arab Authors in Arabic. APTIS 501. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
This course is meant to introduce students of modern Arabic literature to the sheer pleasure of reading and discussing a text in the original language. A special emphasis will be put on the language, strategies and modes of narration, on poetic voices and styles, and on the literary and cultural contextualizations, against the backdrop of the specific genre. The selected texts will include novels, short stories, personal narratives, and poems written by modern Arab authors in the Levant and North Africa during the last two decades. Recent theories of narrative, and issues of gender and post-colonialism, will also be addressed. The list of authors will include, depending on availability: Adonis, Huda Barakat, Salim Barakat, Muhammad Berrada, Mahmoud Darwish, Ibrahim Al-Kouni, Elias Khoury, Hanna Mina, Abdelrahaman Munif, Hanan Al-Shaykh, and Muhammad Shukri. The selected texts will be assigned for reading and analysis, both on a personal and a group level. On the personal level, each student will be asked to focus on a specific text of her or his choice, and present it in class. A substantial term paper is due at the end of the term. Cost:2 (Shammas)
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541(Iranian 541). Classical Persian Texts. APTIS 242. Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
This course involves the reading and literary analysis of texts from major authors of the classical period (ca. 950-1500) and includes basic skills in reading aloud and the use of the rules of prosody in scansion and interpretation of poetry texts. It will include shorter or longer passages from such poets as Firdawsi, Nizami, Rumi, Sa'di, and Hafiz according to the interests of the class and the instructor. There is a midterm and final exams. The texts are in the form of a photocopied course pack. (Windfuhr)
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556(Turkish 551). Modern Turkish Prose Literature. APTIS 252. (2). (Excl).
Part of the sequence in required language courses for concentrators, M.A. and Ph.D. candidates. The objective is to continue to develop comprehension ease in modern Turkish through the reading of the literary products of modern Turks. Recitation type of course includes reading, translation, and discussion of content and style. Quizzes and a final examination are required. Cost: about $5.00 of photocopied material. (Stewart-Robinson)
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562(Arabic 552). Modern Arabic Fiction, II. APTIS 561. Taught in English. (2). (Excl).
Students with a basic reading knowledge of Arabic will be introduced to texts illustrating the rise and current state of the Arabic novel and short story. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary building and translation. (LeGassick)
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564(Arabic 554). Modern Arabic Non-fiction I. APTIS 202 or 403. Taught in English. (2). (Excl).
Students with a basic reading knowledge of Arabic will be introduced to texts by major Arab writers illustrating intellectual issues of importance in Arabic society in the modern era. (LeGassick)
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567(Arabic 543). Readings in Classical Islamic Texts. APTIS 202 or 403. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
This course focuses on the analytical reading of Classical Arabic texts from different fields of Islamic tradition. Priority will be given to medieval Arabic works dealing with the Qur'an hadith biography, theology, law, and Islamic mysticism. We shall read and analyze the texts, discuss their authors as well as the religio-political context in which they were written. Special attention will be given to Arabic grammar and Islamic scholarly terminology. Each student will be asked to choose an Arabic text related to his/her field of research, distribute its copies among the other members of the class, whereupon he/she will lead one reading and discussion section devoted to the text in question. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final exam (translation from Arabic). Cost:1 (Jackson)
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582(Arabic 522). Medieval Arabic, II. APTIS 202 or 403. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
This course is designed for students who wish to learn Arabic for academic purposes. We will begin with the sound and writing system of Arabic, paying attention to accurate pronunciation of sounds and writing Arabic words and phrases with a pleasing hand. Then, we will move to reading, translating, and discussion short passages selected from the Qur'an, Hadith, and medieval Islamic literature. There will be daily reading and written assignments. Evaluation will be based on class participation and performance, monthly tests, and a final exam.
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590. Arabic and Near Eastern Linguistics. (3). (Excl).
Introduction to the principles of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, with emphasis on concepts that can be usefully applied to Near Eastern languages. Lectures will focus on Arabic, and all students are expected to have at least a rudimentary knowledge of this language (one year of prior study or some experience with a vernacular dialect). Lectures will also introduce selective comparative data from other world languages in order to give some indication of the uniqueness of commonness of Arabic constructions. Student's term papers and formal presentations may either be on Arabic or on some other ancient or modern Near Eastern language which the student know well (e.g., another Semitic language or Turkish and Persian). The emphasis is on actual language structures rather than historical development, but there may be some coverage of language-contact and sociolinguistic issues. (Heath)
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593. Mini Course Topics in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies. (1). (Excl).
Section 001 The Early History of the Translation and Interpretation of the Qur'an into English. This course will begin M-F, 2/16, and 2/18-25. A lecture will be given on 2/17, TBA.
This mini course provides a general introduction to the Holy Qur'an, its position among religious revelations, its subject matter and divisions, the major Arab commentaries on it, and the history of the numerous translations made of it into English. Selected texts from such translations will be examined in order to show the different attitudes of the translations towards Islam and its Holy Book. It is hoped that students will gain a better understanding of the basic teachings of the Muslim tradition, especially these days when communication and interactions between Muslim and the Western worlds become ever closer. Required text: Course pack. Cost:1 (Ibrahim)
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