Slavic Languages and Literatures

Courses in Russian (Division 466)

Language 101. First-Year Russian. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103 or 111. (4). (LR).
In this course the student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling) and gradually turns to basics of Russian grammar. Students spend an average of 1.5 hours per day working with tapes and writing exercises. The class is supplemented by video shows and slide shows. Students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies might consider taking the intensive class, Russian 103. Textbook: Live from Moscow, Stage I, Volume I by Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Cost:2 WL:4
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102. First-Year Russian, Continued. Russian 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103, 111, or 112. (4). (LR).
In this course, the sequel to Russian 101, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary, and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture. The class is conducted mainly in Russian and is supplemented by video shows and slide shows. Students are expected to complete 1-1.5 hours of oral and written homework every night. Textbook: Live from Moscow, Stage I, Volume II by Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Cost:2 WL:4
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201. Second-Year Russian. Russian 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 203. (4). (LR).
This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered during the First-Year Russian (101 and 102) courses, focusing on verbal aspect, declension, the verbs of placement, and the verbs of motion. The course also emphasizes speaking and listening skills. Students are expected to complete 8-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: Russian, Stage II by C. Martin and J. Sokolova. Textbook costs $103, but covers two terms. Cost:3 WL:4
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202. Second-Year Russian, Continued. Russian 201. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 203. (4). (LR).
This course assumes students' knowledge of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, and involves a comprehensive study of the declension of numbers, the use of verbs of motion (with and without special prefixes), the formation and usage of participles and gerunds. Students read and write texts of increasing complexity, discussing Russian and Soviet history, culture, and other topics of interest. The course requires 8-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: Russian, Stage II. Cost:3 WL:4
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203/RC Core 293. Intensive Second Year Russian. Russian 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Russian 201 or 202. (8). (LR).
An intensive course meeting eight hours a week + Language lunch table, this course covers the material which is usually covered in two terms in Russian 201 and 202. Special emphasis is placed on speaking, writing, comprehension, and vocabulary building. The course is conducted in Russian and is especially recommended for students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies. Students entering Russian 203 should have completed one of the standard first-year textbooks, such as Russian, Russian for Everybody, Beginning Russian, or Russian Stage One. Students who have not completed such a textbook in their first-year course are best advised to take Russian 102 before beginning the second-year course. Cost:3 WL:2 ,3 (A. Makin)
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302. Third-Year Russian. Russian 301. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 303. (4). (Excl).
Third-year Russian, 302, is a continuation of Russian 301, or it can be taken with permission from the instructor. It covers the following: (1) a review of Russian grammar; (2) readings in Russian culture and literature; and (3) modern conversational Russian. It is a recitation course, and students are asked to participate in class discussions. Cost:2 WL:4 (A. Makin)
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402. Fourth-Year Russian. Russian 401. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 403. (4). (Excl).
Russian 401 is offered during the Fall Term and Russian 402 is offered during the Winter Term of every academic year. Prerequisites: three years of Russian (minimum) plus one term of fourth-year level class. Course is proficiency oriented. Classwork, homework, and lab work include: grammar and word formation, reading and listening comprehension (films and TV news included); discussions; reports and compositions. Phonetics is reviewed in connection with the types of work mentioned above. Weekly grammar tests and final exam. Cost:3 (Vergunova)
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417. Contemporary Russian Culture. Russian 302. The course is conducted in Russian. (3). (Excl).
A course of lectures and discussions, conducted in Russian, designed to acquaint students with various aspects of contemporary culture in Russia. Special attention will be devoted to the development of all four major skills in the use of the Russian language. Assignments will include readings from contemporary writing (from belles lettres to journalism), viewing and listening to electronic media, and extended oral and written presentations. (Katz)
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Literature

222. Russia Today. (4). (HU).
An examination of many aspects of the culture of Russia today: recent fiction, poetry, journalism; film and television; popular- and counter-cultural forms. Problems of ethnicity, religion, private and public life, etc., are explored in terms of their cultural depiction and distortion. Abiding features of Russian culture (such as the privileged role of the writer), the specific issues of a multi-ethnic country, the deeply contradictory situation of women, and the phenomenon of Russian culture beyond the country's boundaries are explored. The course aims to explore the many and diverse forms of "culture" within Russia, and simultaneously to raise questions about the meaning (and relativity) of the term culture in general. Three lectures and a discussion section. No background required; three short papers, three in-class tests, final exam, and journals required. Cost:1 WL:4 (M. Makin)
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352. Introduction to Russian Literature. Russian 351. (3). (Excl).
This is a practical introduction to Russian poetry from Derzhavin to the present day, including principles of versification. Selected readings from the course pack and from The Heritage of Russian Verse (ed. by D. Obolensky). Class readings and discussion, one midterm essay, regular oral presentations by students of the poems of their own choice. Final examination. Taught in Russian. (Ronen)
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355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit twice.
Students develop a term-long reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings may include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credit hours elected, but must correspond to the writing expectations of upper-level department courses.
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450. Twentieth-Century Russian Literature. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
This course provides a survey of Russian literature from the beginning of the Soviet period to the present day. Individual texts are analyzed and placed in the context of political and cultural history. Among the writers examined are: Babel', Bulgakov, Platonov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, Sokolov, Erofeev. For the first half of the course the artistic innovations of the 1920s will be contrasted with the totalitarian aesthetics of High Stalinism; while the second half of the course will examine the artistic and ideological currents in Russian literature since the death of Stalin: the so-called "thaws," prison camp literature, "underground" and "unofficial" literature in the Brezhnev period, émigré literature, and finally, the mosaic of Russian literature in and after the last years of the Soviet empire. Three lectures, with discussion encouraged. No background knowledge required. Two papers, a midterm and a final examination. Cost:1 WL:4 (M Makin)
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452/RC Hums. 452. Survey of Russian Literature. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
This course provides an introduction to the major masterpieces of Russian fiction and drama written in the last third of the 19th century. Among the works to be studied are such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov. We will also read some of Chekhov's best short stories and his play Three Sisters. Texts will be analyzed in the context of the monumental changes Russian society was undergoing at that time. We will trace how writers positioned themselves with regard to the social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries. Topics include gender relations, violence and repentance, utopia, suicide, love and modernity, the metaphysics of beauty, Russia and the West. Midterm, a final, and two short papers. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is required. Cost:2 WL:1 (Schönle)
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471. Modern Russian Poetry. A knowledge of Russian is required. (3). (Excl).
The subject of the course is Russian lyric poetry in the age of Symbolism, with some comparative material on longer narrative poems and verse drama. Reading, translation, and explication of selected poems by Vladimir Solov'ev, Brjusov, Bal'mont, Sologub, Zinaida, and Vladimir Gippius, Konevskoj, Blok, Belyj, Vjaceslav Ivanov, Bunin, Annenskij. Translations are to be prepared for every class. There is a final exam. (Ronen)
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492. Senior Honors Course. Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of Russian 491 and 492.
During 492 (the second half of the year-long Honors course) the student produces a draft of a thesis of fifty to one hundred pages on a topic in literary or linguistic studies, and then, in consultation with a thesis supervisor and the Honors advisor, the final version of the thesis. Regular meetings with supervisor, participation in informal seminars, and successful submission of thesis lead to the award of an Honors degree in Russian. An oral defence may be required. Cost:3 WL:3
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