Romance Languages and Literatures

French, Italian, and Spanish Placement Tests

If you are planning to take an elementary French, Italian, or Spanish class and you are a new student, freshman or transfer student, or you have not yet begun the elementary language sequence on the Ann Arbor campus, you must take the placement test in order to register for the correct course. You must register for the class into which you have been placed.

If you have registered for a class prior to taking the test, you will still be required to take the test in order to verify that you are in the appropriate level class.

If you have already taken French, Italian, or Spanish 101-232 on the Ann Arbor campus, or if you have already taken the placement test once, you are not eligible to take the test again. For questions regarding the LS&A language requirement, please see a general academic advisor or call POINT-10 (764-6810).

Please Note: With the reduction in the number of classrooms throughout LS&A, departments must limit the number of classes offered between 10 am and 4 pm. There will be more classes open before 10 am and after 4 pm. Please take advantage of the opportunity to register for these classes and avoid the "Lottery" (see 2b below).

Instructions for students requesting overrides for French or Spanish 101, 103, 231, or 232.

1. Try to find a section that will fit into your schedule, since the Department cannot guarantee every student a space in a section of his/her own choice.

However, do not register for a class that you cannot attend. You will not be eligible to override into the section of your choice if you are registered for any section of 101-232, even if you cannot attend that section.

2. As it states in the Time Schedule any registered student who misses one of the first four class meetings will be dropped from the course, thereby leaving some open spaces for those students who have been closed out.

If there is absolutely no section open which will fit your schedule, you should follow this procedure:

(a) Start attending the section you would like to get into on the first day of class. You will receive a Proof of Attendance form which must be signed by your instructor every day. You must attend a class every day, but it does not need to be the same section. All students must take action through T-T Registration to make sure their official schedule of courses matches the courses they are taking.

(b) On Tuesday, January 13 at 7:00 p.m., there will be a meeting in the basement of the MLB, rooms to be announced later, for each of the above courses. At these meetings, students will be assigned to remaining vacated spaces in the most fair and equitable manner possible, using a lottery system. At no time, however, will any class be allowed to exceed 25 students. Students must bring their printout of classes and the Proof of Attendance form to the meeting!

3. Please note that you will not be allowed to change sections at these meetings. Beginning Wednesday, January 14, Elementary French Language Supervisors will hear requests for section changes and fill those requests to whatever degree is possible.

4. Please ensure when adding with the override that you also add modifiers for pass/fail, etc.

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. It is strongly recommended that students who began Spanish at another college or university also take the placement test. Students must check with the Course Coordinator for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (LR).

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish. The first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, three exams, and a final written and oral exam.
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102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Continuation of Spanish 101. Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.
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103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated. Goals: Student completing Spanish 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.
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231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills of students; to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to build vocabulary; and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade based on a series of quizzes and exams designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand Spanish plus periodic written work, and oral class participation.
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232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, history, culture, and outlooks, of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade is based on exams, designed to assess ability to speak, understand, read and, write Spanish, plus periodic written work (including compositions) and oral class participation.

Section 004 A Film Tour Through the Spanish-Speaking World Using movies as a resource that provides different models of native speakers, we will study regional varieties of Spanish as it is spoken in Latin America and Spain. Students will deal here with colloquial language, idioms and shared cultural knowledge. The movies, strategically chosen will provide examples of cross-cultural differences as can be perceived in customs, values and ways of thinking, feeling and acting in the Spanish-speaking world. We will see masterpieces such as: El Norte, (Guatemala, Mexico, USA); Danzón, (Mexico); La historia oficial, (Argentina); La sangre del cóndor, (Bolivia); Lucía, (Cuba); [[exclamdown]]Ay, Carmela!, (Espa a). In addition, we will read texts and examine cultural artifacts from the countries of the films we will watch. All four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be integrated in the group discussions and individual homework. (García-Alvite)

Section 007. This course will deal with the City of Madrid, its history, literature, momuments, popular celebrations and physical structure. Course limited to 20 students. Course pack and Internet material.

Section 008 U.S. Latino/a Coming-of-Age Narrative. This course is concerned with linguistic and cultural identity, our own and that of U.S. Latinos and Latinas. In particular, we consider the development of identity, the linguistic, socioeconomic, and political forces that help to shape it, and its expression in language, literature and the arts. We'll read coming-of-age narratives by contemporary Latino/a authors such as Julia Alvarez, Rudolfo Anaya, Sandra Cisneros, Richard Rodriquez, and Esmeralda Santiago; discuss relevant issues such as the rise of Spanglish, bilingual education, and Proposition 187; and review the representation of U.S. Latinos and Latinas in other media such as television, film, music, and dance. Throughout the term, students will be asked to explore the development of their own identities, to think critically and cross-culturally about the material covered, and to give their perspectives thoughtful and creative expression in written and spoken Spanish. This course combines with Lloyd Hall Scholars Program 165.007 to heighten cross-cultural and multi-cultural awareness through exploration of cultural identities and values from two directions: English composition and Spanish language. To take advantage of this unique linked learning opportunity students must register for both courses. (Anderson)

Section 010 Media, Language and Latin America: The Question(s) of Cultural Identity. This course will build on the level of Spanish most students have attained in the first three semesters at the University of Michigan (or equivalent elsewhere), and does not require more advanced language skills than what is expected in other sections of 232. In this course we will be reading Spanish-language newspapers and magazines as well as viewing TV programs and documentaries produced in the U.S. mainly by and for the Latino community. The course readings will include materials from three newspapers published in U.S. cities with significant and distinct Latino populations La Opinión (Los Angeles), El Diario (New York), and El Nuevo Herald (Miami) as well as selected materials from nationally-distributed magazines such as Américas and Hispanic. We will also examine TV programs from Univisión, the Spanish-language channel with the largest audience in the U.S., and episodes from [[questiondown]]Qué pasa USA?, a sitcom about three generations of a Cuban family living in the same house in Miami. Our examination of these materials will focus on the relation between language and Latin American cultural identity as constructed by largely-distributed Spanish-language media in the U.S. Emphasis will be given to class discussions based on daily reading assignments from the course pack. Students will write a journal (2-3 pages per week) in Spanish and reports on projects which we will design according to readings and group activities. Grading: Participation (20%), Journal (30%), Reports (25%), Quizzes (25%). (Herrero-Olaizola)

Section 016 Historietas para leer la Historia/Comic Books to Read History. This course corresponds to the standard 232 class but is designed for those seeking a subject approach to their language learning experience. The four language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension) will be emphasized through a cultural studies approach. Some of the most popular comic strips of Latin America will be read and analyzed as a way of understanding other writings on the contemporary history of the region. The course has a very strong component on reading and composition. "Comics to read history" is open to all students but is strongly recommend for concentrators in social sciences and literature with a special interest in Latin America. (Chavez)

Section 020 Image of U.S. Latino/as in Film. In this section of Spanish 232, students will explore images of U.S. Latinas and Latinos in both mainstream Hollywood and independent films. Taking both a historical and cultural perspective, we will examine a variety of issues such as discrimination, bilingualism, migration, work, and the family. Students will develop skills in Spanish to think and write critically about cinematic representations of U.S. Latinas and Latinos. Course requirements include weekly readings, film screenings, reaction papers, and discussion. Films screened may include: Mi Diva Loca, El Mariachi, American Me, Mi Familia, the Milagro Beanfield War, Latino, Born in East L.A., and Mambo Mouth. (Cashman)
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Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

Other Language Courses

270(358). Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators. Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275(361) or 276(362). A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.
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275(361). Grammar and Composition. Spanish 232. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.
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276(362). Reading and Composition. Spanish 232. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.
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290(307)/Amer. Cult. 224. Spanish for U.S. Latinos. Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

This course addresses the particular linguistic needs and interests of students of Hispanic descent and heritage born and/or educated in the United States interested in acquiring a formal and structural knowledge of Spanish, in further expanding vocabulary at the abstract and professional levels, and in developing their skills in formal and professional writing. Sociolinguistic aspects of Spanish in the United States code-switching, linguistic attitudes, bilingualism - also will be explored in relation to the politics of cultural identity. Short weekly assignments and exercises emphasizing the differences between oral and written modes of communication and between formal and informal Spanish will be required, along with a midterm and final exam. Readings will include cultural essays, literatures, and scholarly articles. (Aparicio)
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305. Spanish for Business and the Professions. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Business Spanish 305 is intended to increase the student's vocabulary and knowledge about the Spanish-speaking business world. Since the class is conducted in Spanish, students must have an understanding of the fundamentals of Spanish Grammar. The course will use authentic material, rely on group discussion, various readings, and exercises. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a project, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course will allow students to develop their Spanish business knowledge to be more effective in the business world. (Dorantes)
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410/Rom. Ling. 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments and a final paper. Course is conducted in Spanish. (Gallego)
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414/Rom. Ling. 414. Background of Modern Spanish. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which the spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, and the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard. The course will be taught in Spanish. The textbook will be made available in a course pack. In addition, graduate students will be required to read the chapters dealing with Spain in Roger Wright, Late Latin and Early Romance. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. (Dworkin)
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Literature

320. Introduction to the Study of Literature. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).
Sections 001, 002, and 004.
This course introduces students to narrative fiction, poetry, drama, argumentative essays, and critical literature. It emphasizes the formal aspects of each genre, including appropriate terminology and analytical/ interpretive approaches.

Section 003. Este curso es una introducción a la literatura espa ola e hispanoamericana. Se leerán selecciones pertenecientes a diferentes géneros y momentos históricos. En las discusiones de los textos se presentarán consideraciones sobre el arte y la estética, la literatura y los estudios culturales, la especificidad de los diferentes géneros y su historia, los conceptos fundamentales de la teoría literaria, y la naturaleza del lenguaje literario. Los requisitos incluyen cuatro examenes parciales y un trabajo final (5-7 páginas). Texto: Virgillo, Valdivieso, y Friedman. Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica. Se complementará este libro con otros textos literarios y artículos recientes de critica literaria y estudio culturales. (Rabasa)
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331/Great Books 331. Great Books of Spain and Latin America. Open to students at all levels. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. (3). (HU). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor).

This course will introduce students to some of the great books of twentieth century Latin America in translation; books by such authors as Gabriel García Márquez, Pablo Neruda, Clarice Lispector, Miguel Angel Asturias, Julio Cortázar, Rigoberta Menchú, Jorge Luis Borges, and others. Are these books great? If so, what makes them great? Can any book be great in a region where many people still can't read or where, even if they can, they don't have the time (or inclination) to read these books? To explore these questions we will read these books in relation to Latin American literary, cultural, political, and social history as well in relation to international trends. Lecture and discussion section format. Participants are responsible for attendance, regular participation, weekly writing assignments, and a couple of papers. (Colás)
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371. Survey of Spanish Literature, I. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

An introductory survey of Spanish literature from its beginning in the Middle Ages to the 17th century. Lectures, readings, and reports. This course is conducted in Spanish.
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373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Section 001 El teatro en Espa a durante la Dictadura de Franco. Sociedad y censura.
The purpose of this course is to expose students to theater written in Spain from the Spanish Civil War (1936-39) until today. Students will explore Spanish society and culture during the Franco dictatorship and the transition to democracy. Many censured documents will be presented which remain unpublished today. Along with the readings of representative theater plays, we will explore movies and various other media (music, photos, biographies, slides, etc.) This enjoyable literature will allow students to experience the difficulty in publishing themes which are frowned upon by government censures and the innovative approaches used to surpass them. Readings will include two theater plays, two one act plays, essays, censure documents and film reviews. Assignments will include an oral presentation, short written papers and two exams. Methods: lecture-discussion. Class conducted in Spanish. (Pérez)
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382. Survey of Latin American Literature, II. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

An introduction to the main currents of Latin American Literature from the 16th to 20th centuries through the study of its major figures. The course is conducted in Spanish. (Sanjines)
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440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 The Politics of Language and Cultural Identity.
This course explores language and bilingualism as sites for defining and reconceptualizing cultural identity among Latinos/as in the United States. Through poetry, prose, essays and testimonies written by Latino/a writers, students will delve into the political meanings of using Spanish, English, and code-switching in literature and in daily life. Issues such as role of language in creating a cultural identity, the practice of code-switching and bilingualism, the dialects between orality and written texts, and the power dynamics related to bilingualism and the use of Spanish in the United States will all be explored. The course is interdisciplinary in its approach and will include readings in literature, sociolinguistics, education, politics and cultural studies. Course requirements include essays and take home exams. Reading knowledge of Spanish is essential. Lectures will be conducted in English. Discussion sections will be conducted in Spanish and English (Section 003, Thursday, 1-2:30 p.m. will be conducted in Spanish). (Aparicio)
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450. Middle Ages. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

This course proposes an intellectual adventure: an exploration of the distant world of the Iberian Middle Ages from the 11th to the late 14th centuries. Our readings will imitate the adventurous nature of the course, dealing as they do with adventures in love, war, and intellectual exploration. We will watch heroes of both genders prove themselves in battle, travel, and bed (in the story of the Siete infantes de Lara, the Libro de Apolonia, and the Libro de beun amor); we will read short and sassy tales against mortal women (the Libro de los enga os de las mujeres) and in praise of the Virgin Mary (Berceo's Milagros de Nuestra Se ora). Works will be read in modern Spanish, with an occasional adventurous foray into the original medieval language. Requirements: Course journal; midterm and final paper; midterm and final exams; active, engaged class participation. (Brown)
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467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Modern Spain. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.
Section 001 Writing Under the Regime.
This course will examine literature and film produced in totalitarian and early post-totalitarian Spain (1938 1980). As a point of departure, we will survey recent Spanish history the Republic, the Civil War, the Franco regime, and the transition to democracy. We will consider the effects of censorship, in particular, the strategies and tactics developed by writers to evade prohibition. We will also consider how political regimes are represented in literary and filmic texts, and how characters struggle to maneuver within repressive fictional societies. Taking a broad definition of regimes, as "systems of rule," we will examine the interrelationships among types of regimes political, economic, religious, familial, literary, and linguistic. To what extent do literary texts function as "regimes of sense," structured by patterns of meaning and sustained by cultural belief systems? To what extent do writing and reading function as "sense-making enterprises," governed by rules, conventions, and beliefs? What degree of expressive and interpretive freedom is possible within this rule-bound activity? Readings: novels, stories, poetry, plays, historical writings (20-30 pp. of careful reading per class). Assignments: two essays (5-7 pp. each), occasional one-page reaction papers, two exams. (Highfill)
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485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Section 001 U.S. Readings of Latin America: The View from Here.
This course offers an examination of Latin American culture and literature as it is viewed from a dual U.S. perspective "inside" and "outside" the Latino community. First, we will explore an "inside" reading of Latin America as proposed by the Latino communities in the U.S. Among the "inside" representations of Latin America we will read a selection of articles from three Spanish-language newspapers La Opinión (Los Angeles), El Diario (New York), and El Nuevo Herald (Miami) which target various Latino communities in the U.S. (Mexican, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, etc.). Likewise we will read literary works by Latino writers such as Sandra Cisneros' La casa en Mango Street, Cristina García's So ar en cubano, or Esmeralda Santiago's Cuando era puertorrique a. Second, we will explore an "outside" reading of Latin America as proposed by documentaries (The Gringo in Ma analand, The Panama Deception), films (Missing, Romero) and a selection of essays and newspaper/magazine ( New York Times, Newsweek, Time) articles from an Anglo-American viewpoint. In our examination of this dual U.S. perspective we will pose the following questions: What is considered "Latin American" according to these two perspectives? How do these two views differ, overlap or converge? What do these "inside" and "outside" representations say about U.S. and Latin America relations? Grading: Participation (20%), Journal (30%), Midterm Paper (25%), Final Paper (25%) (Herrero-Olaizola)

Section 002 Latin American Cinema, History, and Society. This course will provide a critical and interdisciplinary perspective on the development of Latin American cinema from its inception to the present. The history of Latin American cinema in the past forty years is intertwined with sociopolitical, cultural, and literary transformations. The analysis will focus on the relationship between cinema and society, as shown in the various film styles that have evolved in each country. The course will cover the "New Latin American Cinema," the "social documentary," the "cinema novo," the industries of Mexico, Argentina, and Brazil and the more recent productions in countries without previous industries. We will study the impact of technology, culture, literature, international production, and political transformation on the films made in Latin America. We will look at all genres of films from documentaries and experimental, to musicals and epics. Besides screening and analyzing films, the course will also center on the theories postulated by Latin Americans, in search for a definition of their specific styles and genres, as "cinema novo," "imperfect cinema," or "third cinema." The course will have two one and a half hours of meeting time, plus two showings of the same film per week. Films and texts will be in translation (subtitled). Written assignments, midterm and a final project/paper required. Students interested in increasing their language skills are advised to take the additional Spanish Discussion section elect it as a UC course, and will have an additional credit hour. (De la Vega-Hurtado)
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488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Section 001 Topics in Hispanic Linguistics.
This course has three main goals: (1) to serve as a general introduction to the goals and assumptions of generative grammar; (2) to develop some beginning tools of linguistic analysis via selected properties of Spanish; and (3) to examine the relationship between linguistics and other fields, looking in particular at the question: "What is Spanish linguistics?" The course will be taught in Spanish. (Satterfield)
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