Music

It is possible for LS&A students to elect a concentration program in music, and this program is described in the LS&A Bulletin. In addition, music courses are frequently elected by LS&A students not concentrating in Music. Courses in Music History/Musicology, Composition, and Music Theory are elected for LS&A credit. Some of these courses can be used in an area distribution plan. LS&A students may elect music PERFORMANCE courses for degree credit, but this credit counts toward the maximum twelve non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward an AB/BS degree or twenty non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward a BGS degree.

Courses in Courses in Music History/Musicology, Composition, Music Theory, and Performing Arts Technology are listed in the Time Schedule under the School of Music.

The following courses count as LS&A courses for LS&A degree credit.

Courses in Music History and Musicology (Division 678)

140. History of Western Art Music: Music of the U.S. and Euro-American Music Since World War I. Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the concentration advisor. (2). (HU).

Music of the United States and American and European music since World War I. Includes both vernacular and art-music traditions. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (R.Crawford)
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240. History of Western Art Music: Classic Era Through World War I. Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the concentration advisor. (2). (HU).

History of music from the Preclassic era to World War I. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Wiley)
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306. Special Course. Non-music only. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 Music, Politics and Popular Culture in the U.S.
This discussion based class will require participants to examine the role music plays in our own lives and that of the world around us to approach contemporary culture as critics, rather than consumers. Starting from the premise that music can influence our perception of the world, we will interrogate the potent social messages which composers have encoded in a wide range of musical works, including but not limited to hip hop, jazz, classical music. A primary task of the course will be to develop a critical vocabulary based upon writers in sociology, literary theory, women's studies, and contemporary music criticism. Students will be asked to prepare for discussions by keeping a listening journal and by writing several brief two-page papers. Grading will be based upon the quality and presentation of ideas in the writing assignments described above as well as two exams, class participation, and a group project. No previous experience in music or music history is necessary. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Clague)
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341. Introduction to the Art of Music. For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU).

The course is designed for those who wish to sharpen their appreciation of music, whether they have any musical background or not. It begins with the fundamentals of melody, rhythm, harmony, and texture, then surveys the heritage of Western art music, from the Baroque era to the present. We examine representative examples of opera and concerto, symphony and song, solo and chamber music, popular song and rock; but the listening skills developed in class are meant to be applied to virtually any kind of music. Such skills involve understanding conventions of musical expression and form, so that students learn to listen with appropriate expectations. Students attend three lectures and one discussion section per week. Tapes of assigned works are available for private study. Grades are based upon examinations, concert and listening reports, and participation in discussion sections. This is the first course suggested for the LS&A concentration in music. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Rabin)
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346. The History of Music. For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU).

This course deals with European and American music, its performance and reception, from 1750 to the present. Although most pieces studied are from art traditions, samples from popular music and jazz are also included. Music is discussed as samples of compositional styles, but also as representatives of broader cultural and historical frameworks. Lectures are supplemented by recorded listening assignments (cassettes available at the language lab listening facilities) and readings from a textbook. Students should have some familiarity with rudiments of music. Grades will be determined by performance on exams. A short, extra-credit paper will be optional. Cost:2 WL:1 ,4 (André)
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347. Opera of the Past and Present. For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU).

This is a lecture survey dealing with selected operas from 1600 to the present. The case studies discussed will be representative of works frequently performed today. Normally we discuss several opera composers each week, students being asked to see videos of selected scenes, to hear audio cassettes, and to do selected readings from periodical literature. Readings and discussions will take varied approaches, considering operas as music compositions, as show pieces for voices, as samples of literature, and as cultural icons. Translations are provided for any works in foreign languages. Students will also be urged to attend an opera performance and to write a paper describing the experience as a personal experience reflecting social cultural, and aesthetic issues. Grades will be determined by two hour exams and a final exam. No musical background necessary. WL:1 ,4 (D.Crawford)
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405. Special Course. (2-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 Making Rock: A History of the Techniques and Aesthetics of Rock Record Production. (3 credits).
This course will chart the development of rock record production over the course of the past fifty years. Through readings and critical listening, we will examine various aspects of record production as they relate to compositional process and the formation of musical style. These include, among other things, recording and mixing techniques, the roles of the various participants in the collaborative process, aesthetic stances and beliefs, and the ways in which rock recording constitutes a field of rhetorical expression. Source readings will include interviews with producers, engineers, songwriters, musicians, and arrangers. Musical examples will be drawn from a broad range of rock styles and genres. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Zak)

Section 002 Music in Medieval Culture. (3 credits). What music did people listen to in the Middle Ages? What may it have meant to them? These are the key questions to be addressed in this course on music in medieval culture. Following a brief overview of the music history (ca. 600-1450) students will explore a series of topics in lecture, required reading and listening assignments: the spirit of Gregorian Chant; women's music-making; music and the art of love; music and the Gothic cathedral; the hidden world of medieval popular music. The musical repertories examined will be plainchant, secular song, and polyphony (part music). Authors whose works we will read include Boethius, Martianus Capella, Hildegard of Bingen, Andreas Capellanus, and Boccaccio (all in translation and excerpted in the course-pack). Grading will be based on midterm and final examinations, an oral presentation, and a term paper. Some background in music is helpful, but the instructor welcomes undergraduate and graduate students with interests in medieval history and culture or European languages, including Latin. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Borders)
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406. Special Course. (2-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 Music of Asian Americans. (3 credits).
This course examines musics of Asian Americans as a means to understand processes of musical, personal, and communal identities in multiethnic, multiracial, and transnational contexts in the U.S. The lectures will discuss a diversity of musics, ranging from Cantonese operas in Chinatowns and Taiko drum music in Japantowns to Philipino-American rap and avant-garde works by "assimilated" Asian Americans. Discussions will emphasize the musics as products and processes of being "ethnic" in American and transnational locales. Students will be encouraged to do "hands on" and/or reflexive projects for their term papers. They can, for example, report on the use of traditional Asian musics in their hometowns, or analyze the fusion of Asian and American elements in the music that they regularly consume. Specific listening and reading assignments will be coordinated with individual lectures the listening tapes will be put on reserve in the Music Listening Lab, the Language Resource Center, and the MLB; the readings will be available as course packs. Student evaluation will be based on participation in class discussions, quality of two short term-papers, and performance in midterm and final examinations. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Lam)
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407. Special Course. (2-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Section 001 Music and Narrativity. (3 credits). Reviewing Beethoven's Fifth Symphony in 1810, E.T.A. Hoffmann argued that instrumental music was superior to vocal because it transcended verbally definable content. And yet people who listen to wordless music commonly find themselves imagining stories. This common experience of plotting to music, long denigrated by formalist aestheticians as unsophisticated and misguided, now seems to be gaining academic respectability, as the recent rehabilitation of so-called musical hermeneutics and (especially) the emergence of a new splinter discipline, musical narratology, bear witness. Can narrative theory enhance our understanding musical form? (How is a symphony like a novel, if at all? If there is a story, who is telling it?) Does it contribute to, or only further confuse, longstanding debates about "absolute" vs. "program" music, or about form vs. expression as sources of aesthetic value? Or, for that matter, can knowledge of musical form enhance our understanding of certain narrative texts (for example, Thomas Mann's Tristan or Richard Powers' The Gold Bug Variations)? Or are we ultimately talking about a few flimsy analogies, with no decisive aesthetic relevance to either music or literature? The class will survey relevant critical writings, examine the musical evidence adduced therein, and attempt its own theoretical applications (or deconstructions) in individual reports. Lectures will be fashioned so as to include both students of music and music-loving students of literature or philosophy. Limited to 22 students. Cost:1 WL:1,4 (Whiting)

Section 002 Urban Ethnography. (3 credits). This course is a survey of issues pertaining to ethnomusicological fieldwork. Early readings will focus on the development of ethnographic methods in anthropological and ethnomusicological research and changing definitions of the "field." As the semester progresses, our readings will focus more specifically on designing a research project, writing proposals for funding, taking fieldnotes, conducting interviews, analyzing and "writing up" data gathered in the field, and negotiating ethical issues. In a series of short assignments, students will be expected to apply specific methodologies discussed in class to a field project of their own design. Each assignment will be distributed to all members of the seminar in order to facilitate discussion of the process of and problems involved in conducting fieldwork. Each student will be required to submit an ethnographic paper at the end of the term, drawing on field research and class readings. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their short assignments, final paper, and contributions to the seminar. Cost:1 WL:1,4 (Jackson)
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408. Special Course. (2-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 Music of Mozart. (3 credits).
The principal aim of this course is to expose students to a representative sample of the works of Wolfgang Amadé Mozart, and to the issues surrounding his career and the contemporary reception of his music. But the course also has the wider goal of providing some idea of the music (and its social contexts) of other eighteenth-century composers, using Mozart's life and achievements as a framework. Grades will be based upon examinations and short writing projects. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Rabin)

Section 002 Electro-Acoustic Music: Repertory, Techniques, and Cultural Influences. (3 credits). The ability to capture and manipulate sound has had a profound influence on the development of musical culture in the twentieth century. In this course, we will examine the nature of this influence, drawing examples from a broad range of musical styles and idioms where the interface between technology and music resulted in both practical and conceptual expansions of musical expression. Such expansions include the use of sound recording by avant garde artists (of all sorts) in the early years of the twentieth century, new approaches to the interpretation of the existing classical music repertory specifically aimed at recorded or broadcast representation, the implications and opportunities for popular music, new avenues of musical composition resulting in new types of musical works, changes in the modes of distribution and reception of music, and changes in aesthetics and general discourse about music. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Zak)
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457/CAAS 400. The Music of Black Americans. Non-music concentrators must have permission of instructor. Musical background preferred. Undergraduates only. (3). (HU).

This course is a survey of the varied musics made by African Americans from slavery to the present. Particular attention will be devoted to the relation of musical style and performance to changing historical, social, philosophical, technological and cultural conditions. Students, while not required to read music, will be expected to develop listening skills in order to distinguish genres, performance styles, and recording techniques. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two non-cumulative examinations, listening assignments coordinated with class readings, concert reports and a research paper. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (Jackson)
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464/CAAS 464. Music of the Caribbean. (3). (HU).

See Afroamerican and African Studies 464. (de Jong)
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478. Renaissance Music. (3). (Excl).

This is a lecture survey of music history from about 1400 to about 1600. Assignments consist of readings (mostly periodical literature) and listening assignments. Discussions will focus on changing compositions devices and also on cultural contexts for music performance. Grades will be determined by two hour exams and a final. Some musical background is required. Cost:1 WL:1 ,4 (D.Crawford)
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Courses in Composition (Division 665)

221. Introduction to Elementary Composition. For non-School of Music students only. (3). (CE).

Designed for students with some musical background who wish to gain an understanding of the creative process and acquire a greater appreciation for contemporary music by composing. The course investigates traditional compositional crafts, as well as more current or experimental tendencies, including pop, ethnic, and jazz idioms. Directed student creative projects receive individual attention. The prerequisite is the ability to read music. (Santos)
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222. Composition. For non-School of Music students only. Music Composition 221. (3). (CE).

Composition 221 and 222 are taught in the same classroom; 222 is a more advanced continuation of 221. (Santos)
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421. Creative Composition. Non-School of Music students must have completed Music Composition 222 or Music Theory 238. (3). (Excl).

An introduction to composition for students interested in concentrating on original creative work in contemporary idiom. Student creative projects for which individual instruction is provided, are complemented by bi-weekly lectures, investigating appropriate aspects of musical language and compositional craft. (Daugherty)
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422. Creative Composition. Music Composition 421. (3). (Excl).

Composition 421 and 422 are taught in the same classroom; 422 is a more advanced continuation of 421. Cost:1 (Daugherty)
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423. Advanced Composition. Music Composition 422. (2,4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

For students capable of original creative work. Instead of classwork as in 421-422, individual instruction with course instructor is provided. Participation in a weekly seminar (Music Composition 450) devoted to the examination of a broad range of Twentieth Century literature is required. Cost:1
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424. Advanced Composition. Music Composition 423. (2,4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

See description for Composition 423. Cost:1
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425. Advanced Composition. Comp. 424. (2,4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Stresses the shaping and instrumentation problems involved in composing for the mixed consort and examines differing approaches to musical notation. Weekly seminar participation (Music Composition 450) is required.
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426. Advanced Composition. Comp. 425. (2,4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

See description for Composition 425.
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Courses in Music Theory (Division 696)

139. Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills I. Music Theory 129 or placement by Theory Evaluation Survey Test. Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the Chairman of the Department of Music Theory. (1). (Excl).

Sight-singing, vocal chord arpeggiation, keyboard and dictation exercises, major and minor keys including diatonic sequences, most frequent patterns of modulation and special techniques associated with 5-3 and 6-3 chords. WL:4
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140. Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills II. Music Theory 139. (1) . (Excl).

A continuation of Music Theory 139. WL:4
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150. Basic Musicianship: Writing Skills II. Music Theory 149. (2). (Excl).

A continuation of Music Theory 149. Review of rudiments; introduction to harmony and voice-leading involving triads, seventh chords, figured bass and procedures for four-voice writing; writing activities with diatonic harmony including cadential 6-4, analyses of harmony, phase-structure, texture and elements of configuration in shorter pieces. WL:4 (Dapogny)
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238. Introduction to Musical Analysis. Music Theory 137. (3). (HU).

The course is a continuation of Music Theory 137 and thus assumes a basic understanding of scales, chords, and tonal harmony. In Music Theory 238 an emphasis is placed on elements of chromaticism, larger forms and 20th-century techniques. Laboratory sessions supplement lectures and provide opportunities for discussion and practical application of musical materials. One term-long analysis project and weekly homework assignments. WL:4 (Petty)
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239. Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills III. Music Theory 140 and 150, and concurrent enrollment in Music Theory 249. (1). (Excl).

Deals with chords to areas other then V; modulation to wider ranges of keys, harmony involving mixture, tonicization in major and minor and Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords. WL:4
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240. Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills IV. Music Theory 239 and concurrent enrollment in Music Theory 250. (1). (Excl).

A continuation of Music Theory 239. The last half of this course introduces 20th-century materials. WL:4
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250. Basic Musicianship: Written Skills IV. Music Theory 249 and concurrent enrollment in Music Theory 240. (2). (Excl).

A continuation of Music Theory 249. Writing activities involving melodic and rhythmic figuration, leading-tone seventh chords, diatonic modulation and chromatic voice-leading techniques; analysis of period structure, binary form, ternary forms. The last half of this course introduces 20th-century materials such as atonality, exotic scales, pitch-class sets, and 12-tone serialism. WL:4
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351. Analysis of Tonal Music. Music Theory 238, 240, 334. (2). (Excl).

In-depth analysis emphasizing elements of structures evident in various important examples, offering a variety of analytical problems; readings on tonal forms. WL:4 (Petty)
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430. Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music. Music Theory 351. (2). (Excl).

Primary emphasis is on the development of analytical and aural skills in significant 20th-century music using varied repertoire, varied aural and analytical approaches. WL:4 (Hubbs)
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Courses in Performing Arts Technology (Division 691)

201. Microcomputers and Music. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Students receive basic instruction in the use of microcomputers, synthesizers, and computer music software for composition and recording. Requires the ability to read music and some musical keyboard proficiency. (Bloom, Polot)
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