Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Afroamerican and African Studies (Division 311)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Afroamerican and African Studies.


CAAS 105. Introduction to African Studies.

Introductory Courses

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Contemporary Africa has certain striking cultural, social, political, and economic characteristics. These characteristics range from cultural diversity and creativity, colonially-created national boundaries, high rates of population growth, and economic underdevelopment to passion for development and political stability. This course is designed to address the basic question: Why and how did African countries acquire these characteristics? We will seek to provide, in a broad and wide-ranging survey, a coherent explanation for the transformation of African cultures, societies, politics, and economies, in relation to internal developments and to the effects of external forces. Special emphasis will be placed on major historical and social processes and their relation with one another. The historical evolution of Africa will be traced, but this will be done as a means of shedding light on the conditions and circumstances of contemporary Africa. The underlying approach is to seek to integrate whatever is known of the pre-colonial and colonial past (as revealed by archaeology, anthropology, history, etc.) with an understanding of post-colonial societies and politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 231/Hist. 275. Survey of Afro-American History, II.

Historical Perspectives

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 275.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 303/Soc. 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Instructor(s): Michelle Harris-Reid (hreid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Sociology 303.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 335/Rel. 310. Religion in the Afro-American Experience.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Sections 002-007 may be elected ECB

Instructor(s): Miles

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Religion 310.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 341/Theatre 222. Introduction to Black Theatre.

Literature and the Arts

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 348/Dance 358. Dance in Culture: Origins of Jazz Dance.

Literature and the Arts

Instructor(s): Robin Wilson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an exploration of the origins of Jazz Dance through movement, as it relates to African-American vernacular dance, the African Diaspora, and American culture as a whole, placing African-American vernacular dance right at its center and providing a broader understanding of the influence of African-American dance and its legacy within 20th-century concert dance. Starting from the early dances of enslaved Africans in the Americas to the present, this course investigates the relationship of African-American vernacular dance to jazz dance forms. Its focus in this context is the influence of African-American vernacular dance and the identification of specific movement motifs and concepts, such as rhythm, improvisation, theme, syncopation, balanced asymmetry, and body carriage, as a clear retention of African culture and rooted deeply in the African aesthetic, as evidenced in the work of George Balanchine, Martha Graham, Jerome Robbins, and Jack Cole. It will identify the commonalities of movement and aesthetics of both, as well as the sociocultural conditions that contributed to their creation and influence in American dance and culture. The course utilizes movement sequences, as well as lecture, group discussion, supplemental readings, film, and video components, to provide both an experiential and theoretical understanding of these concepts. Class will also incorporate improvisation as an essential element through the class, as a basic concept in all African Diasporic forms. Course requirements: Studio participation and regular attendance at all lectures; reading assignments; take-home midterm; midterm choreographic phrase; final research project, and final choreographic phrase. This course is intended for Dance majors, CAAS students, and the wider university community. Two meetings a week, 1.5 hours per session, in a format mixing lab with lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 002 African American Social Thought

Instructor(s): Alford Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore theoretical perspectives on the social condition and social character of African Americans. The schools of thought to be considered include integrationist (liberal and conservative), nationalist, Afrocentric, feminist, postmodern, and marxist. The overarching goal of the course is to understand, interpret, and critique strands of social thought on Black Americans. The course will consist of representative readings of each school. We will interrogate each school, and then compare and contrast them through a series of examinations and short essays. Tentative readings include: Cornel West, Race Matters; Shelby Steele, The Content of Our Character; Patricia Hill Collins, Black Feminist Thought; and Molefi Asante, Afrocentricity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 003 Health and Disease in African Worlds. Meets with History 392.001

Instructor(s): Nancy Hunt

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hist392/

See History 392.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 361. Comparative Black Art.

Literature and the Arts

Instructor(s): John Lockhard

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 360. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a continuation of AAS 360, an accelerated course which provides an interdisciplinary overview of Afro-American culture and art. AAS 361 develops further information and dialogue for a closer examination of the interrelationship of the arts, and of how they influence and are influenced by society. The approach continues to be interdisciplinary, and Afrocentric. The Afro-American cultural experience and its various forms of existence and encounters are brought under close scrutiny in a variety of contexts: these will range from the historical and political to the philosophical, the religious, and the aesthetic. In the process, this course also examines the relationship of West African cultures to both South and North American insistencies. The course also recognizes and will examine the controversies surrounding the impact of the Afrocentric aesthetic on Western culture and lifestyles. Slides, films, and guest appearances will supplement lectures. But this course is also designed to be interactive and communal and to create opportunities for students to strengthen their skills and establish a clearer, more substantial concept of identity, focus, and direction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 400/MHM 457. The Musics of African Americans.

Literature and the Arts

Instructor(s): Travis Jackson (travieso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Musical background preferred. Undergraduates only. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Music History and Musicology 457.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, an electronic override will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 418/Poli. Sci. 419. Black Americans and the Political System.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Instructor(s): Vincent Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Political Science 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 422/Anthro. 411. African Culture.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Instructor(s): Maxwell Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

CAAS 448/Hist. 448. Africa Since 1850.

Historical Perspectives

Section 001 Colonialism, Nationalism, Cosmopolitanism

Instructor(s): Timothy Scarnecchia (tscarne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

Upper-Level Writing R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tscarne/44899syl.htm

See History 448.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Instructor(s): Ronald Woods

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 450 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence on the constitutional and legal history of African Americans. It covers the phase of this history beginning with the advent of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and extending to the present. In this course, we will approach law as an institution which is constantly shaping and being shaped by the cultural, economic, political, and social environments around it. In looking at the interaction between law, race, and historical process in the latter half of the twentieth century, the course will explore the reciprocal relationship between law and the societal order, the role of law in the philosophical and social discourse of African Americans, and the function of law in the developmental strategies adopted by them. This course will routinely examine the constitutional and legal experience of African Americans as a case study in how ideas are transformed by historical forces in malleable principles of law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 455. Seminar on Project and Research Planning.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for juniors and seniors working on Honors theses in Afroamerican and African Studies. Fundamental research methods, strategies, and resources are introduced and applied to the students' projects. Participants meet to discuss and present their work to the seminar. Permission of instructor required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Contemporary State Relations in Africa

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Over the last decade and a half, the way in which scholars think about Africa's political problems have changed and have come to be profoundly influenced by the theoretical debates concerning weak and strong states in the international community. This is a course in comparative politics designed to explore two closely related dimensions of contemporary state relations in Africa. First, we will explore the strengths and weaknesses of the diverse interpretations of "stateness" in the context of how African states establish effective governments and manage to exercise control over the permanent populations under their jurisdictions. We will note any tensions between the theoretical concerns of the analysts and the political realities of Africa. Second, we will examine relations among African states, paying particular attention to Africa's catalog of contemporary conflicts: boundary disputes; conflict resolution successes and failures; refugees; wars and the prospects for peace on the continent. The course is recommended for juniors and seniors. A previous background in African studies is not a prerequisite. It will be taught as a seminar, but the instructor will give a few lectures, interspersed with a lot of class discussions and student presentations. Students will be required to give class presentations on topics to be defined in close cooperation with the instructor. Students will also be expected to build on their presentations and develop them into substantial research papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 477/NR&E 477. Women and the Environment.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Instructor(s): Dorceta Taylor (dorceta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores issues related to gender, race, class and environmental inequality. It looks at the historical role of women in the environment in the U.S., explores the development of environmental ideologies, and looks at the relationship between women, environment, and social justice. It examines environmental sub-movements like ecofeminism and environmental justice. The course also examines gender and inequality in the international context. In particular, it focuses on women and development issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Performance & Politics in Africa: The Arts in the Making and Dismantling of Dictatorships. (1 credit). January 26 through February 23, 1999. Drop/Add deadline: February 8

Instructor(s): Nkanga

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will analyze the ways in which artists and performers have contributed to making opressive regimes and how, in other contexts, they contributed to undermining those regimes. Through their works, artists and performers developed signs and rhetorical images aimed at the powerholders whose image they promoted at first. This change of attitude can be seen in more or less hidden messages addressed to the people subject to the hardships imposed by dictatorial regimes such as that of Mobutu Sese Seko in former Zaire.

Through selected films, visual materials, and readings, the students and instructor will look at the ways performance and other art works evolved and contributed to the making and dismantling of dictatorships. Beyond pondering the semiological questions raised by such an approach, the students and instructor will examine the validity, the pertinence, and the impact of such forms of communication. Other forms of social communication will be considered during the course. In addition to viewing films and visual works, the class will read plays by Wole Soyinka and a variety of texts on civil society, resistance, literature, and other topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 002 The Development of Psychological Research in Africa. (1 credit). Meeets with Psychology 401.003. Meets March 8-April 14. Drop/Add deadline: March 12

Instructor(s): Denis Chima Ugwuegbu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Prof. Ugwuegbu is a Social Psychologist and visiting professor in Psychology & CAAS. The former head of the Department of Psychology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, he is engaged in research on several subjects including:

The primary objective of this course is to equip students with the necessary knowledge, skils, and techniques that will enable them to carry out psychological research on African topics and in Africa. The courses is aimed at upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in psychology, Afroamerican & African studies, and related social science disciplines.

The course begins with an examination of the status of psychology and of psychological and social research in Africa impediments to the development of psychological and social research in African settings; ethical standards and abuses of early research privileges by researchers in Africa. This is followed by a comparative analysis of African traditional approaches to gaining knowledge and Western psychological and social science approaches. The student will furthe learn how to plan psychological and social research in Africa, the use of scientific sampling techniques in African settings, how to recruit and train field workers or interviewers, and how to obtain data that are reliable, valid, and generalizable from a non-Western population such as in Africa.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 510. Supervised Research.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Slavery, Resistance, & Emancipation in the Atlantic World

Instructor(s): Julius Scott

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar surveys the origins, development, and destruction of plantation slavery in the Americas. It focuses upon various forms of resistance of enslaved Africans to plantation regimes in the United States, the Caribbean, and South America, and covers the struggle to end slavery in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 002 Higher Education in Africa and the Diaspora

Instructor(s): Teshome Wagaw (twagaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar examines the conditions of higher educational institutions, in their multifaceted form, both in Africa and the African diaspora. Students will have opportunities to develop research papers that reflect on the development of institutions of higher education and their impact on a society's cultural and political development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 595/Hist. 595. Topics in African History.

Historical Perspectives

Section 001 African Nationalist and Millennial Politics

Instructor(s): Timothy Scarnecchia (tscarne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tscarne/mnpsyl99.htm

See History 595.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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