Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in American Culture (Division 315)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for American Culture.


Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the studentís concentration or BGS advisor.

Courses in Ojibwa

A full sequence of Ojibwa cannot be guaranteed. Students must consult with the American Culture Program Office before undertaking Ojibwa to satisfy the College language requirement.


Amer. Cult. 100. What is an American?

Instructor(s): Matthew Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W99/AMC100/index.html

How have different Americans imagined what it means to be American? What ideas about national history, patriotism, and moral character shape their visions of Americanness? How do they draw the boundaries that define who belongs within the nation and who gets excluded? This course will study some of the answers that Americans have given to these questions in both the past and present. Our assumption will be that there is no "right" answer to the question, "What is an American?" just ongoing political and cultural debate. We will study that debate in a wide array of materials: journalism, memoirs, film, fiction, political manifestoes, historical research, and World Wide Web sites. We will look at many conflicting visions of America including some that are disturbingly exclusionary and we will pay close attention to the ways that Americans have thought about the value and challenges of diversity (racial, ethnic, regional, religious, and other) in the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Alternate Americas Science Fiction As History

Instructor(s): June Howard

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

History is not only about the past, and science fiction is not only about the future. Both forms offer narratives about what has been, what might have been, and what might be. This course will explore many different visions of America, mostly through reading science-fictional "alternative history." We will also cross generic and national boundaries to read complementary works, including mainstream fiction, historical essays, and essays about the idea of the nation, history writing, and story-telling. Possible texts: Ray Bradbury, A Sound of Thunder; Kim Stanley Robinson, The Lucky Strike; Philip K. Dick, The Man in the High Castle; Octavia Butler, Kindred; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Geoff Ryman, Was; Orson Scott Card, Pastwatch. Format: discussion. Assignments: several short writing assignments, collaborative presentations, self-designed term projects. This class is part of the first-year seminar series and will encourage participation, critical thinking, and independent research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 204. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 American Independent and Low-Budget Cinema, Eraserhead To Sling Blade

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Brent (esb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($10) required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

ARTS

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

David Lynch...The Coen Brothers...Spike Lee...Jim Jarmusche...Wayne Wang...Julie Dash...Richard Rodriguez... The past twenty years represent a new era in narrative cinema, a new generation of filmmakers, and an economic and industry context in which independent cinema has flourished. This generation of filmmakers created stylistically innovative and ideologically complex movies on virtually no budget, often on personal credit cards. The proliferation of independent film festivals nationally and internationally, and the availability of video rental opened up new opportunities for these young, innovative filmmakers. This course focuses on cinematic and ideological analysis of these low-budget films and of the broader cultural, economic, and historical context through which they were produced, such as: the marketing of multi-culturalism; the economics of film production and distribution; the proliferation of film festivals; the influence of MTV; new video technology; conservative efforts at censorship and broader national events and issues. Lectures/discussions will focus on stylistic elements within the film texts, as well as the broader cultural context of the means of production how it was that these films got made in the first place. We will also examine the ways in which these films draw from, alter and add to ideological conventions of Hollywood cinema around issues of: masculinity; national identity; family values; violence and the media; Judeo-Christian iconography; community; psycho-sexual drama; capitalism; the immigrant experience; Utopianism; and the burden of history. Film screenings will include: Eraserhead (David Lynch, 1978); Stranger than Paradise (Jim Jarmusche, 1985); She's Gotta Have It (Spike Lee, 1986); Blue Velvet (David Lynch, 1986); Sex, Lies, and Videotape (Steven Soderberg, 1989); Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1992); El Mariache (Robert Rodriguez, 1993); Smoke/Blue in the Face (Wayne Wang, 1995); Bound (Wachowski Brothers, 1996); Sling Blade (Billy Bob Thornton, 1996); Boogie Nights (1997); Watermelon Woman (1997).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 205. American Cultures.

Instructor(s): DuPuis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

American Culture 205 explores the "making" of American identity and literature from colonial to contemporary cultures. The course will be guided by the question, "What is an American?" We will look at the ways this question contained or excluded particular ethnic groups such as European Americans, Native Americans, African Americans, Latino/Latina Americans, and Asian Americans, as well as how cultural groups differentiate their experiences yet still identify as Americans.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 Making History for Americaís Classrooms - Conflict and Consensus

Instructor(s): Joseph Moreau (rjoyce@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the struggle to define American history and control its presentation in primary and secondary schools. Students will address the questions that have divided historians, teachers, politicians, and the public at large for more than 200 years. What purposes should history teaching serve? How should the history curriculum be determined within a democracy? Who may legitimately write history, and what voices are authentic? While we will discuss questions of reception how students construct their own understandings of history from textbooks and other sources we will focus mostly on the creation of what Michael Apple terms "official knowledge." For instance, how have the demands of the publishing market, mandates by local and state government, and other forces influenced schoolbooksí treatment of sensitive topics such as the Civil War, religious tolerance, and racial diversity? Readings, which will include excerpts from popular textbooks from the 1820s onward, will address these issues from a variety of perspectives. We will devote much of the second half of the term to current controversies, including the move to "multiculturalism" and the recent push for national history standards. As time permits, we will contrast history designed for schools with narratives produced for popular media, including film (Amistad) and television ("The History Channel"). Students will be responsible for several reaction papers, a term paper, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 213. Introduction to Latino Studies Humanities.

Instructor(s): Frances Aparicio (franapar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Latino Studies with an emphasis on the humanities. Issues of cultural identity, race, class, gender, and the ways in which U.S. Latinos/as negotiate their locations in between two dominant cultures, the Anglo and the Latin American, will be examined through diverse cultural sites such as fiction, poetry, essays, visual arts, music, performative arts, and language. Attention will be paid to the dominant forms of representation of Chicanos, U.S. Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, and other Latino groups in the United States as well as to the alternative self-representations that Latino/a artists and writers have proposed from the margins. Readings will include primary texts as well as samples of diverse scholarly approaches to U.S. Latino/a cultures. Course requirements will include a midterm and final exams, short assignments, and active class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 215. Introduction to Asian American Studies Humanities.

Instructor(s): Hashima

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Introduction to Asian American Studies will examine the nature of American culture and society through a specific study of one racial/ethnic group, Asian Americans. The Asian American experience reveals the dynamics of race relations and economic stratification in the USA as well as the continuing process of defining America and American. This course provides an introductory study of the experience of Asian immigrants and their citizen descendants in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The groups covered include Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Pacific Islander, South Asian, and Southeast Asian Americans as well as the heterogeneity within the various ethnic communities, such as gender, class, generation, and region. Topics for discussion will include international/domestic relations, immigration policy, ethnic literary expressions. The format of this introductory course is largely lecture with an emphasis on encouraging and incorporating student discussion and dialogue especially in applying their knowledge gained from this course to an analysis of contemporary American society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to give the conversational and cultural skills necessary to enable students to use Ojibwa in real life situations. The teaching methods are entirely inductive, and the role of writing is downplayed. There is considerable emphasis on teaching culturally appropriate behavior, and the simple conversational patterns of greetings, leave takings, Introductions, table talk, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 224(307)/Spanish 290. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners.

Courses in Spanish

Section 001 This course meets the Spanish Language Requirement for the Latino Studies Concentration

Instructor(s): Frances Aparicio (franapar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Spanish 290.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 230/Hist. of Art 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

ARTS

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/230-001.html

See History of Art 230.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4


Amer. Cult. 240/WS 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Instructor(s): Beth Hackett (bhackett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 243/WS 243. Introduction to Study of Latinas in the U.S.

Instructor(s): Hernandez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is am exploration into the multiplicity of social and cultural histories and relations that define the variety of experiences of Latinas in the United States. We will examine the many ways in which ethnic, racial, class, gender, and sexual differences have shaped these experiences. Special attention will be paid to the construction of identities and to power relations in the United States. During the term we will discuss these processes using a wide range of multidisciplinary materials. The course is thematically organized and it includes topics such as: Differences among Latina women: racialization; "Border" women/ "Barrio" women: the Geography of Identity; "Mother," "Sister," and "Daughter," En-gendering Betrayal: Sexuality and Transgressions; and Differences "at Work".

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001 Planning the Metropolitan Region: Sprawl, Environment, and Race. (3 Credits). Meets with Environmental Studies 402.001

Instructor(s): Patrick McGovern (patmcgov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Environmental Studies 402.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 Asian Pacific Americans & the Law. (1 Credit). Mini Course Runs February 16 March 23. Drop/Add deadline: February 23

Instructor(s): Hwang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an overview of how federal and state laws have affected the Asian Pacific American (APA) experience and presence in the U.S. The course will cover the APA historical timeline, exclusion laws, alien land laws, World War II internment of Japanese Americans, affirmative action as it applies to APAs, civil rights and racial hate crime violence, bilingual issues in education and the workplace, and the drive for native Hawaiian recognition and separation, among other topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 003 Native American History, 1492 to the Present. (3 credits). Meets with History 393.001

Instructor(s): Parmenter

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 393.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 004 Popular Culture and Multicultural Practices. (2 credits). Meets with Music Education 446.001. Graduate students must enroll in Music Education 446

Instructor(s): William Shea (billshea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Theme Semester ARTS

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Drawing on issues in popular culture and music education, this course will show how selected music cultures, including "youth cultures" and "minorities cultures," have influenced the rich and diverse multimusical landscape of America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 302/Soc. 302. Introduction to American Society.

Instructor(s): Howard Kimeldorf (jkimel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Sociology 302.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 001 Empowering Families & Communities. (4 Credits). Lab Practicum on Community Intervention. Meets with Psychology 317.001 & 318.001

Instructor(s): Lorraine Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Theme Semester

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 317.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 002 Practicum in the Latino Community: Community Issues in Latino/Latina Schools. Meets with Psych. 305.004

Instructor(s): Christina José-Kampfner (carino@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of the proposed course is first, to expose students to Latino youth and their Southwest Detroit community (a multi-ethnic neighborhood); second, to educate students about cultural aspects of human development, mental health, and contrasting theoretical approaches to social change; finally, to help he students analyze their practical experience using this theoretical framework. The overall goals of the course are to educate students to be able to envision themselves working in an urban community setting and to become motivated to work for social change in their academic and professional careers. This course will be a field course involving two visits per week to a Southwest Detroit community. A neighborhood school will be used as the site for tutoring and working with the children. In this course, the instructors themselves will supervise the field experience. No Spanish is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to improve the basic conversational skills of the student who knows some Ojibwa. The emphasis in class is on increasing the range of situations in which the student can use Ojibwa in real life. Some emphasis is placed on teaching the students to be able to learn more Ojibwa outside of the classroom, by talking and using the language with native speakers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 328/Engl. 382. Native American Literature.

Instructor(s): Betty Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 328.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 345. American Politics and Society.

Instructor(s): DuPuis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As the twentieth century draws to a close, America faces an array of social and political issues of enormous significance. From poverty, "big government" and militia groups to immigration, health care and new social movements, and many other issues, America and Americans seem intent on redefining the terms on which our social and political relationships rest. Whether it is homelessness, affirmative action, AIDS or any of a number of other contentious issues, social concerns have become political agendas and political agendas have dictated social concerns. In this course we will examine a variety of these issues from an interdisciplinary social science perspective.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 350. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Open to American Culture Concentrators only

Instructor(s): Sandra Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

It is generally assumed that the field of American Studies is supposed to explain the meaning of America, or more specifically, the US. Yet, for as long as the field has been around, scholars have wrestled with the question of who "Americans" are, what constitutes American culture, and what sorts of geographical, historical, and political entities are actually encompassed by term "America." The course will introduce students to these debates as they have been shaped by the methodologies practiced in our field. Weíll be surveying a variety of inter/disciplinary conversations: cultural studies, critical legal theory, feminism, theories of transnationalism, literary criticism, and history. The overall goal here is to suggest that both the discipline of American Studies, and its subject "America" are always under continual construction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 373/Hist. 373. History of the U.S. West.

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W99/HS373/index.html

See History 373.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 388. Field Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the studentís area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 398. Junior Honors Writing Workshop.

Section 001 American Culture 398 is Open to American Culture Honors Students only
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of a concentration advisor in American Culture. (1-3). (Excl).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Amer. Cult. 404/Soc. 404. Hispanic-Americans: Social Problems and Social Issues.

Instructor(s): Sylvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing. (3). (Excl).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Sociology 404.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4


Amer. Cult. 410. Hispanics in the United States.

Section 001 Women in Prison: Gender and Crime Among Blacks and Latinas. Meets with Womenís Studies 483.001

Instructor(s): Christina José-Kampfner (carino@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course you will learn about women in prison. This course will focus on the oppression that these women experience before, during, and after incarceration. Interviews will be scheduled with women at the prison which will be the basis for a final paper. The approach for these papers will utilize the Human Science perspective. As we study the experiences of these women as they participate in their existence we will use abstract categories and scientific constructs to analyze their experiences. Requirements: (a) midterm and final paper; (b) class participation; (c) reaction papers; (d) class presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 420/Spanish 420. Latin American & Latino/a Film Studies.

Courses in Spanish

Instructor(s): Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 270 or 275. A previous course in Film & Video, or Latin American history, or Latino Studies. (4). (Excl).

ARTS

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Spanish 420.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is aimed at giving students with conversational ability in Ojibwa the opportunity to both improve their speaking and listening skills and to Introduce them to Ojibwa literature, and the various dialects represented in the literature. Students will work with the original, unedited texts, as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials, and thus learn about the problems of working in a language without a standard widely accepted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 430/WS 430. Feminist Thought.

Instructor(s): Beth Hackett (bhackett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 240 and one 340-level WS course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 430.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 432/Hist. of Art 420. National Identity in American Art.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any prior coursework in history of art, American culture, or American history. (3). (Excl).

ARTS

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/420-001.html

See History of Art 420.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4


Amer. Cult. 489. Senior Essay.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrators and Amer. Cult. 350. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for concentrators who desire a more directed research experience with individual faculty at the end of their undergraduate career. It allows a senior concentrator in American Culture the opportunity to write a research paper under the direction of a particular faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 490/Film-Video 451. American Film Genres.

Section 001 Students Must Attend Film Screenings T and/or Th 7-9 P.M. Sections 002-004 may be elected ECB

Instructor(s): Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Upper-Level Writing ARTS

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An historical and critical survey of the film genres that have shaped the global profile and functioning of the American film industry since the late nineteenth century. Placed in broad cultural context, the linkages between film genres and other forms of American popular culture will be addressed, as will the impact of technological, aesthetic, and sociopolitical change on the definition and evolution of generic boundaries. Special attention will be given to the shaping of ethnic and gendered identities, along with the use of genre formats to address sociocultural tensions in the nation at large. Genres to be considered (in alternating years) include: silent and sound comedy; the musical; the Western; the gangster film; the adventure/disaster film; blaxploitation; family melodrama; the detective-mystery film; the road movie; and science fiction. The Winter 1999 course will focus mainly on comedy, the musical, and the gangster film. Weekly screenings will supplement readings, lectures, and group discussion. Two short essays, a midterm, and final paper will be assigned. Prerequisites: FV 230 "Intro to the Moving Image" is desirable.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Asian American Womenís History. (3 credits). Meets with Womenís Studies 483.005

Instructor(s): Gail Nomura (gmnomura@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Meets the interdisciplinary requirement for Womenís Studies Concentration. Through historical texts, oral histories, and writing by Asian American women this seminar will study the lives and historical experiences of women of Asian ancestry in the United States. Major topics covered include an examination of class and gender in Asia and Asian America, immigration, labor, politics, stereotypes, family, community, war, the anti-Asian movement, and resistance and transformation. Students will research and write a major paper on a topic of their choice in Asian American womenís history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Pragmatism, Jazz, and American Culture. (3 credits). Meets with History 593.001

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Theme Semester ARTS

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a senior seminar in cultural and intellectual history. Jazz music emerged early in this century as a predominantly African American popular music. Especially in the 1920ís "Jazz Age," the new music was a site of moral panic: for many Americans it gave a soundtrack to transformations in attitudes about race and interracial contacts, gender and sexual freedom, and the comparable values of "high" and "low" culture. To its practitioners and proponents, jazz signaled the way toward a more pluralistic, democratic, and improvisatory vision of modern America. To its critics, jazz represented the encroaching mongrelization, vulgarity, and illusory freedoms of modern America. Through primary and secondary texts, we will explore these controversies, which obviously prefigured debates about rock and roll, and rap music. Later overshadowed as a popular music by rhythm and blues, rock and roll, soul, rap, and hip hop, modern jazz and its offshoots have grown increasingly specialized. Especially since the 1960ís flowering of radical Black nationalist cultural work, many leading creative improvising artists have taken on an avant-gardist mission of radical social critique about racial exploitation, ethnic identity, and the commodification of Black culture. Our exploration of cultural, political, and aesthetic issues in jazz culture will also involve texts by white and Black pragmatist philosophers like William James, John Dewey, and Cornel West. To some extent, these philosophers explicated and encouraged the reorientation of American thought and culture as signaled in sound by jazz and related musics. This is not a course in music history but a seminar on culture and ideas as seen through the lens of musical change. It is expected that students will have done some previous work in American cultural or intellectual history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 The 1960's: From the Old Left To New Left in Politics and Culture. (3 credits). Meets with History 397.002

Instructor(s): Alan Wald (awald@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Theme Semester ARTS

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The Sixties" is an interdisciplinary course meeting once a week for three-hours to explore political and cultural features of that controversial decade. We start with the political origins of the "New Left" in the remnants of the "Old Left," using Isserman's If I had a Hammer and the documentary Seeing Red, followed by Doctorow's novel The Book of Daniel. We then survey much of the terrain of the following ten years, including the Free Speech Movement, Black Power and Black Arts Movements, Second Wave of Feminism, and anti-Vietnam War movement. Several guests who played important parts in the movements of the 1960s will visit the Seminar to dialogue with us.

The course meets the Senior Seminar requirement in American Culture. Requirements: two papers; participation in a group presentation; a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 004 Investigating Reality in 20th Century U.S.: Documentary, Photography, Film, and Literature. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Margarita de la Vega-Hurtado (delavega@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

ARTS

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will focus on the persistent trend to reflect reality in American literature, film, and photography. We will analyze how this impulse to accurately represent reality becomes predominant in the twentieth century, based on some concepts developed earlier and that have become central to the cultural landscape in the United States. We will see how the "documentary style" becomes the predominant form of expression in photography, film, the visual arts, and literature during the first half of this century. We will analyze some of these works in detail. The seminar will have a weekly discussion complemented by film screenings and readings. Students will conduct individual research on a specific topic, compile a bibliography, and present their findings in a final paper or project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 005 U.S. Imperialism Across the Pacific. (4 credits). Meets with RC Social Science 460.001

Instructor(s): Gail Nomura (gmnomura@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Upper-Level Writing Theme Semester

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Social Science 460.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 006 Mariachi Performance Ensemble. (3 credits)
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

ARTS

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El Mariachi Michicano performs traditional Mexicano music throughout the university and the surrounding community. Students learn basic mariachi musicianship, historical and contemporary issues in mariachi as a socio-cultural practice, and participate in community outreach. Musicians are required to prepare individual parts for a mandatory weekly two-hour rehearsal and participate in at least one public performance in addition to the End of term Concert. Previous mariachi experience or Spanish language fluency are not required; however, violin, trumpet, and guitar players should have a working knowledge of their instruments and some music reading ability and/or good aural skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 007 Michigan in the Era of Industrialization. (4 credits). Meets with History 396.001

Instructor(s): Francis Blouin (fblouin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~bhl/bhl/franclas/syllabus.htm.

See History 396.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2


Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 008 History of American Sexualities. (4 credits). Meets with History 396.002

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Upper-Level Writing Theme Semester

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 396.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2


Amer. Cult. 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Nature in American Literature and Culture. (4 credits). Meets with English 417.007

Instructor(s): James McIntosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore how "nature" has been significant as an idea in American Culture and literature; how it has shifted its ideological meaning in the United States from the early nineteenth century, when it was associated with Manifest Destiny, to the present, when it more often implies an ecological and ethical awareness; and how different groups such as early New Englanders, African-Americans under slavery, and twentieth-century Native Americans have experienced landscape and the spirit of nature differently. Writers to be studied may include Hawthorne, Thoreau, Dickinson, Douglass, Morrison, Hemingway, Erdrich, and Silko. Throughout, we will consider literature as one lens among several with which to view American nature, and include history and the visual arts in our exploration. Students are asked to keep a journal and write a short paper and a long paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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