Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Cultural Anthropology (Division 319)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.


Anthro. 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stuart Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and physical anthropology. It emphasizes a set of fundamental concerns: the nature of culture, human variation and universals, cultural relativism and how knowledge of evolution and pre-history should inform our understanding of what it means to be human. Specific topics include: primate (monkey and ape) behavior, evolution and the concept of race; the origins of agriculture and the rise of social complexity; language and culture, kinship and family, sex and gender roles, ethnicity, and religion; the emergence of the world system, culture and political economy, and globalization. This course is intended to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that characterize the discipline. It stresses the intellectual methods that characterize the discipline. It stresses the unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students new ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Required readings include an introductory text and several paperbacks. Lectures and discussion. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true/false questions), each covering one half of the term; the second exam will be given on the final day of class. Section leaders require quizzes, assignments, and perhaps a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

Anthro. 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Conrad Kottak (ckottak@umich.edu), Elisha Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture and ethnicity; human genetics, evolution, and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex and gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and globalization. Required readings may include an introductory text and various paperbacks. Lectures and discussion. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and perhaps a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 3, 4

Anthro. 272/Ling. 272. Language in Society.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anthony Berkley (aberkley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What place does language have in everyday life? Do people really communicate when they speak to each other? How is language used to reinforce relationships of power, especially along racial, gender, and class lines? How do languages change, and how does change reflect the structure of society? This course is about the nature of language and the ways in which it reflects and informs social life. Topics covered include: (1) How and why languages change; (2) the relationships between speech and social class, race, and gender; (3) the politics of language use in society, including language policy in third-world societies (especially in South America) and the "English-only" movement in the United States; (4) the ways in which language is used to construct social, cultural, and political "realities" and the ways these realities are contested as, for example, in the abortion debate. We will try to answer some of these questions in this course, which is about the nature of language and social life. The course has no prerequisites except curiosity about the interrelationships between language and society. There is a required text, Nancy Bonvillain, Language culture and communication, and a supplementary course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 285. Cult Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Ford (riford@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Cult archaeology examines claims in the press and on television that cultural achievements by American Indian people are a consequence of contact with superior beings. The examples will be drawn from the prehistory and contact periods in the New World and the approach will be a case study using critical thinking as an analytical method. Claims of contact with beings from outer space, diffusion of ideas and methods across the Pacific, and pre-Columbian appearance of Europeans and Africans will be examined. The subjects discussed include art, architecture, agriculture, social change, and cultural evolution. The goal is for students to learn critical thinking, to understand professional ethics, to appreciate cultural racism and the harm that it does, and to analyze popular beliefs in an imperfect knowledge arena. The course format is lecture and discussion sections. Evaluations are based on section exercises, two exams, and participation. The texts are Williams, Fantastic Archaeology; Feder, Myths and Frauds; and a course pack. Slides, videos, and museum specimens supplement the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Anthro. 317/REES 397. The Political Economy of Transformation in East Central Europe.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katherine Verdery (verdery@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 396. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W99/REES397/index.html

This course offers an overview of East Central Europe emphasizing changes in that region since 1989 in the context of the previous Communist System. Using an anthropological perspective, it gives attention to the region's pre-Communist history and how socialism worked, and moves to the "revolutions" of 1989 and contemporary economic, social, political, and cultural processes. These include the building of a civil society, privatization, decollectivization, markets and consumption, changing gender relations, and problems of nationalism. The course is run as a combination of lecture and class discussion, with section meetings. Course requirements include an in-class midterm and final examination, a short paper, and class participation. Books to be purchased include Stokes, The Walls Came Tumbling Down; Drakulic, How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed; Verdery, What Was Socialism and What Comes Next. There will be a sizable course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 330. Culture, Thought, and Meaning.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Sections 002-005 may be elected ECB

Instructor(s): Michael Fahy (michfahy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is offered as an intensive upper-division introduction to cultural anthropology for students who have not had other anthropology courses, and as an introduction to cultural analysis for students who have had some (other sorts of) anthropology. Concentrators and non-concentrators at all levels are welcome. There are no prerequisites. The course is concerned with the individual, and with culture as a system of meanings. Attention will be focused both on exotic cultures and on our own, in an effort to develop a truly cross-cultural perspective on how different people construct "reality." Especially emphasized will be the role of communication, and of "mind" including cultural ontologies, epistemologies, logics, aesthetics, and rhetorics. The goals of this course are: (1) to facilitate reading of scholarly books and articles in cultural psychology, cultural semantics, intercultural communication, and the like; (2) to learn to write clear and effective essays in these genres; and (3) to learn to think cultural analysis routinely.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 3, 4

Anthro. 336. Warfare in Tribal Society.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 222 or sophomore standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides a survey of warfare (armed conflict) in pre-modern tribal societies drawing on materials from Melanesia, Africa, and South America. The social, economic, and political factors that elucidate the causes and conduct of tribal warfare are investigated through a comparison of case studies. The general applicability of theories that emphasize resource competition, balance of power, structural predispositions and adequacy of dispute settlement are assessed. Consideration of the conduct of warfare include: diplomacy, alliance, organization, mobilization, strategy, tactics, codes of conduct, casualty rates, territorial consequences, and the motives of participants. Course format consists of lecture and discussion. Course requirements include a class report and a take-home exam (final). This course is designed primarily for undergraduates and should be of particular interest to non-concentrators and concentrators alike.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 356. Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 The Anthropology of Aging

Instructor(s): J Traphagan (jtrap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.psc.lsa.umich.edu/meca/anth356.html

This course considers the influence of culture on the universal human experience of aging. Special emphasis is placed on: (1) the behaviors and meanings attached to the aging process and (2) the experience of old age in different cultural settings. We will consider various aspects of the aging process from a cross-cultural perspective, including life course transitions, death, dementia, illness and health, intergenerational ties, and social transformation. The main text for the class is The Cultural Context of Aging: Worldwide Perspectives (Jay Sokolovsky, ed). In addition, we will read J. Keith, et al. The Aging Experience: Diversity and Commonality Across Cultures, which provides an example of methods for cross-cultural studies of aging, and three ethnographies (Lawrence Cohen, No Aging in India: Alzheimer's, The Bad Family, and Other Modern Things, Akiko Hashimoto, The Gift of Generations: Japanese and American Perspectives on Aging and the Social Contract, and Margaret Lock, Encounters with Aging: Mythologies of Menopause in Japan and North America). Students will be evaluated via a midterm take-home exam (30%), research paper (40%), and class presentation (30%). The course will be taught as a combination of lectures and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 357. Undergraduate Seminar in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Culture, Memory & History. Meets with History 397.001

Instructor(s): Ann Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in cultural anthropology and junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Is it possible to be a cultural anthropologist without also being a kind of historian? And is it possible to do historical research without being an ethnographer in the archives? Many scholars would answer "no" to both questions. Some would answer "yes" but still call upon the theoretical insights and methodological tools of the other to accomplish their work. When we study people's memories do we understand them to be a reflection on the present or an assessment of the past? Do different societies have different dispositions toward the past? What is "nostalgia" and how do you study it? These are some of the questions that will be explored in this course that situates itself on the sometimes discomforting interstices of ethnography and history. We will focus on research projects that demand a double vision and attention to both. Students should have taken at least one course in anthropology or history prior to the seminar. Evaluations will be based on participation and timely preparation. Requirements include a weekly short commentary on the readings, a critical book review (in historical ethnography and/or cultural history) and a research paper or essay final exam. The class will be conducted as a seminar with discussion. Required books may include: Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman; Robert Darnton, The Great Cat Massacre; David Cohen, The Combing of History; J. Rappaport, Cumbe Reborn: An Andean Ethnography of History; Natalie Davis, Fiction in the Archives; Sidney Mintz, Sweetness and Power; Boyarin, Jonathan, ed. Remapping Memory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 357. Undergraduate Seminar in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Mythic Narratives in Contemporary Native American Literature

Instructor(s): Crisca Bierwert (crisca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in cultural anthropology and junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Contemporary Native American literature publishes mythologies, renditions of ritual practice (and boundaries of sacred knowledge), and narrative structures without the mediation of contemporary anthropologists. In this course we look at mythic forms in contemporary literature and in ways that critical discourses in the humanities (including anthropology) view these literatures. We also look at ways in which the writing draws on anthropological accounts from the past, ways that scientific inquiry is figured in the texts, and ways that the literatures, in their autonomy, challenge and invite anthropological interpretation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 357. Undergraduate Seminar in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Anthropology of Europe

Instructor(s): Janet Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in cultural anthropology and junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The class will examine studies, issues, and debates in the vast field of European ethnology. Key concerns will be: what are the boundaries of European anthropology and a concept called "Europe"? How have anthropologists made intellectual decisions in the midst of global and local transformations, and given the explosion of cross-cultural interactions in and around the continent? Can we talk about a tradition of European anthropology and any kind of common identity among its practitioners? [Witness the active existence of such organizations as the European Association of Social Anthropologists]. Are European anthropologists necessarily European? Does the region studied have to be formally designated as Europe? What kinds of regional hierarchies exist within the discipline of anthropology? Finally, how do recent shifting identities, outbreaks of hate-mongering in parts of Europe, and so-called postmodern and postcolonial problems affect anthropological practices in the region? These points will be discussed in this seminar. Grades will be based on class attendance and participation, successful completion of readings, a term paper, and several shorter exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 385. The Archaeology of Early Humans.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the many exciting new discoveries in the archaeology of our earliest human ancestors, tracing what we know of human cultural and biological evolution from the first appearance of upright, small-brained, tool-making humans, 2.0 to 2.5 million years ago, to the appearance of fully modern humans in the last 30,000 to 40,000 years. The course is divided into two segments. The first briefly surveys the techniques and methods used by archaeologists to find ancient archaeological sites, and how they go about studying the fossil human remains, animal bones, and stone tools from these sites to learn about ancient lifeways. This section also looks at how studies of living primates in the wild, such as chimpanzees, as well as modern hunter-gatherers, such as the Bushmen and Australian Aborigines, can help us to interpret the distant past. The second segment of the course turns to the actual archaeological record, looking at some of the most important finds from Africa, Asia, and Europe. In this segment, the course follows the accelerating developmental trajectory of our ancestors from the simplest tool-makers, who lacked any sign of art or religion, to humans much like ourselves, who began to bury their dead with clear displays of ritual and who adorned the walls of their caves and their own bodies with art. The course is oriented as much toward students with a general curiosity and interest in the human past as toward students who will become eventual concentrators in anthropology. Requirements include two in-class hourly exams and an optional final examination. Required readings: a text and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 386. Early Civilizations.

Archaeology

Section 001 Early New World Civilizations. Sections 002-005 may be elected ECB

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course considers the long-term development of the ancient pre-Columbian American civilizations, with particular attention to the Aztec, Maya, Inca and their neighbors in time and space between ca. 2500 BC and AD 1530. The geographic coverage extends from the arid terrain of northwest Argentina and northern Chile on the south, northward through the diversified Andean regions of Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador, and Colombia, through the low-lying tropical forests of Central America, and into the tropical forests, highland valleys and northern deserts of Mexico.

The course begins with a discussion of the general principles of cultural evolution. We then discuss a series of archaeological case studies in which anthropological archaeologists have tried to explain the development of increasingly complex cultural forms. We conclude by comparing the great cultural variability in pre-Columbian American civilizations and reflecting upon how an understanding of these ancient societies can provide useful perspectives on major problems such as population pressure, ecological degradation, and ethnic conflict that confront our modern world. No special background is assumed. There are three lectures and one discussion section per week. Students are evaluated on the basis of three 10-page essays (totaling 90% of the course grade), submitted about one month apart through the term, and a series of short discussion-section exercises (10% of the course grade). Textbook: Prehistory of the Americas, 2nd edition, by Stuart J. Fiedel. Cambridge University Press (paperback edition: $24.95).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 387. Prehistory of North America.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 282. (3). (Excl).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are introduced to the diversity of prehistoric Native American cultures in North America, with emphasis on the Eastern Woodlands, Plains, Great Basin, and Southwest. Twelve thousand years of accommodations to diverse natural and social environments are covered, starting with the initial peopling of the Americas and ending with early contacts between Europeans and Native Americans. Topics of special interest include the extinction of mammoths, mastodons, and other megafauna at the end of the Pleistocene or "Ice Age"; changing hunter-gatherer adaptations leading to the independent domestication of several seed-bearing plants and the origins of agriculture; the development of organizationally complex societies, often called chiefdoms, in the Southeast and southern Midwest; and the devastating impact of European exploration and colonization on the cultures of Native North America. Requirements include two in-class hourly exams and an optional final examination. Required readings: a text and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 390. Primitive Technology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Miller

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course uses a combination of hands-on techniques, ethnographic videos, and discussions of archaeological and ethnographic readings to give students an appreciation for the skill with which past peoples manipulated a wide range of raw materials. We examine social as well as functional and economic reasons for the development and adoption of new inventions. The class also discusses methods of deducing manufacturing techniques from archaeological objects. The weekly labs use various materials, including stone, wood, clay and metals, to conduct experiments and make tools used in subsequent labs or course projects. Students will write and present a paper or design a museum display based on their own replication of an ancient object. Grades will also be based on a lab notebook and class participation, including critical assessment of the readings. Texts: John Seymour, 1990. Forgotten Crafts. Henry Hodges, 1989. Artifacts. Reader (also on reserve). Students may also need to purchase raw materials for their course project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 399. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 Honors Ethnology

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied in the winter term of their junior year for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. Students in this course design a research project, carry out original field or library research, and write a lengthy thesis paper suitable for publication. The research, reading, and writing will cover two terms. The purpose of the course in the fall term is to help students to refine their projects as they pursue their research. Thus, students will meet together with the Honors advisor once a week in seminar to read and discuss a range of research strategies and fieldwork methods drawn from significant monographs and papers related to students' projects. In addition to contributions to classroom discussion, students will make at least four formal presentations of material from their own research. The research portion of the project should be completed by the end of the fall term. In the last two sessions of the fall, students will present oral summaries of their final reports, outlining their key research problems, methods, results, and their proposed outlines for writing their theses in the winter term. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In winter term, the students will convene weekly in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects, present drafts, and get feedback from the group, as well as stay in contact with their second reader. By the end of the winter term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation for the group in a session open to the whole department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 399. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 002 Honors Archaeology

Instructor(s): Richard Ford (riford@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This Honors course sequence in archaeology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in archaeology and who have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the fall term, the students will meet once a week to define research problems in archaeology, to review the intellectual history of American archaeology, to discuss the construction of analytical and mathematical models appropriate for archaeology, and to analyze methods and procedures for solving problems. This seminar provides background which enables students to define a senior Honors thesis project. The second part of the course sequence begins once a thesis topic is selected. Each student in consultation with the Honors advisor may request any Department of Anthropology faculty member to serve as a thesis advisor. Periodically Honors students convene to discuss together their research progress. At the end of the second term of the Honors sequence, each student writes an Honors thesis and presents a seminar summarizing the project and its conclusions. Original field research, library sources, or collections in the Museum of Anthropology may be used for Honors projects. Prior excavation or archaeological laboratory experience is not required for participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Anthro. 404. Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Webb Keane (wkeane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Insular Southeast Asia lies at a cross-roads linked to India, China, the Middle East, and the Pacific Islands. It includes the world's fourth most populous nation (Indonesia), the largest of America's former possessions (the Philippines), Malaysia, the city-state of Singapore, and the tiny but oil-rich sultanate of Brunei. This course explores the remarkable ethnographic diversity of the region, from the royal courts of Java, the temples of Balinese Hinduism, the churches of Philippine Catholicism, and the Islamic movements of Sumatra, to the urban sprawl of Jakarta and Manila and the multinational factories of Malaysia. The course combines lectures and discussion. There will be exams and a paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 405. Peoples and Cultures of India.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R. Freeman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an overview and introduction to the cultures and societies of the Indian subcontinent viewed in anthropological and ethnohistorical perspective. While the focus will be on classical anthropological concerns relating to the nature of caste systems, religious and regional identities, and kinship and social life in village and urban India, this provides the context for further engaging key historical issues on the role of pre-modern traditions and colonial rule in shaping our study and understanding of Indian society, and for understanding the contemporary significance of ethnicity, religious communalism, and changing gender relations in South Asia. The readings consist primarily of ethnographic pieces selected to cover a variety of sub-regions and issues, plus two general works, one a survey of Hindu-Muslim communal relations, and the other a survey of the caste system. Course evaluation will be based on a midterm and final essay-exam and on participation in structured class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 411/CAAS 422. African Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to and familiarize them with the nature and dynamics of the unity and diversity of pre-colonial sub-Saharan African cultures and societies. The focus is on INSTITUTIONAL characteristics. Topics covered include: ecology and environment; the distribution of races and peoples; economic institutions; kinship and marriage; political legal institutions; religious, magical, and witchcraft beliefs and practices; music/dance and the arts. Grades are based on four take-home papers and contributions to class discussions. Films and videos.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Anthro. 417. Indians of Mexico and Guatemala.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101, 222, or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture course provides an overview of Indian groups occupying Mexico and Guatemala. Groups include the Maya, Nahuatl (Aztec), Zapotec, Mixtec, Huichol, Mixe, Tarascans, etc. Course will focus on social and political organization, world view and religion, subsistence, settlement patterns, etc. Comparisons and contrasts between groups will be made in an effort to determine shared ancestry, the borrowing of various practices, the domination of one group over another, and independent developments. Two required papers (midterm and final) constitute course grade. No prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, overrides will be given at the first few classes.

Anthro. 438. Urban Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Fahy (michfahy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What characterizes life in an urban society? What are the common features and/or variations between urban societies situated in different cultural and historical contexts? In addressing such questions, this course will be organized around two broad concerns: (1) the anthropology of cities: the main factors shaping the nature of urban life, the historical emergence of urban forms, and different forms of urbanism; and (2) anthropology in cities: examining themes such as social networks, class, gender, idioms of identity, and the status of institutions, with reference to specific ethnographic accounts. Topics will be addressed through lectures and classroom discussion and will be based on the reading of required texts. Assessment will be based on two take-home exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 439. Economic Anthropology and Development.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to economic anthropology and development in rural, village-based, tribal, peasant, urbanizing and industrializing societies and cultures of the Third World: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East. The FIRST PART reviews the nature of economic anthropology, its scope, objectives, basic concepts, theories and methods of investigation. It discusses economic anthropology as it relates to conventional/development economics. The SECOND PART examines anthropological (social science) perspectives on development and underdevelopment: progress, modernization, acculturation, socioeconomic growth. The THIRD PART is concerned with specific case studies of problems of Third World development and underdevelopment: rural/urban poverty and inequality; women and development; international migration and globalization; etc. The course CONCLUDES with an overview of global issues in Third World development and underdevelopment in a post-cold war environment. The course is recommended for anthropology concentrators and all students with serious interest in comparative cultures and Third World development and underdevelopment. Lecture/discussion format. Films and videos shown in class when available. Final grades based on three take-home papers and contributions to class discussion. Basic texts: Lucy Mair, Anthropology and Development; and Polly Hill, Development Economics on Trial.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Anthro. 447. Culture, Racism, and Human Nature.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in the social sciences. (3). (Excl).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

Anthro. 448/Rel. 452. Anthropology of Religion: Ritual, Sanctity and Adaptation.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R. Freeman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The varieties of practices, beliefs, and experiences we recognize as "religious" seem significantly present in every human society, through all of human history. Nevertheless, the very nature of these phenomena, what they are and are about, and therefore, how we understand the role, function, and relative importance of religion in human life persist as crucial questions in a number of academic disciplines and contemporary social issues. Anthropology has been engaged with these questions since its founding, and the goal of this course is to provide a survey of the definitional problems, theoretical approaches and methods that anthropologists have brought to their comparative study of religious systems around the world. The lectures, readings, and class discussions will begin with general issues and an overview of anthropological theories of religion and then take up a number of ethnographic case-studies to explore the variety of approaches that anthropologists of religion have pursued in widely divergent cultural contexts. Substantive issues of myth, ritual, symbolism, performance, possession, and ancestor worship, as well as issues of doctrine and belief associated with the "high" religion of literate cultures will be treated from a variety of contemporary and historical perspectives. Course evaluation will be based on two essay exams, and a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 455/WS 455. Feminist Theory and Gender Studies in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How are gender and power related? What does gender have to do with racial, sexual, or national identities? This course shows that feminist anthropology offers an important perspective for analyzing gender as an integral part of the organization and representation of social life. It examines the conditions within which women and men act, and focuses on how gender is historically constructed and embedded within institutions and beliefs in different social strata and cultures. It relates feminist anthropology to issues of contemporary concern and to problems addressed by other disciplines. The class will combine lecture, discussion, and student presentation. It will draw on a variety of theoretical, ethnographic, biographical, and visual materials. Students will write several short commentaries on readings and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 457. The Film and Other Visual Media in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Visual Encounters With the Other. Required Film Screening M, 3-5 P.M. Sections 002 and 003 may be elected ECB

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in cultural anthropology, American culture, women's studies, or film and video studies. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

New approaches to the study of film which focus on how cultural issues are represented, negotiated and contested in a wide range of documentary, ethnographic, and narrative films showing students how the construction of "otherness" and modern "selfhood" are played out in films. Moving from the "voyage out" to the "voyage in," the course parallels the way anthropology as a discipline has moved from an emphasis on differences to a desire to map points of contact and identification, and understand the otherness in our own midst.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Anthro. 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 People in Movement

Instructor(s): Janet Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"While he waited for the result of his interview, Obi paid a short visit to Umuofia, his home town, five hundred miles away in the Eastern Region. The journey itself was not very exciting. He boarded a mammy wagon called God's Case No Appeal and traveled first class; which meant that he shared the front seat with the driver and a young woman with her baby. The back seats were taken up by traders who traveled regularly between Lagos and the famous Onitsha market on the bank of the Niger. The lorry was so heavily laden that the traders had no room to hang their legs down. They sat with their feet on the same level as their buttocks, their knees drawn up to their chins like roast chickens. They beguiled themselves with gay and bawdy songs addressed mostly to young women who had become nurses or teachers instead of mothers."

(Chinua Achebe, No Longer at Ease).

This course is about the vast mosaic of people in motion: from place to place, from perception to practice, from praxis to program; seeking enjoyment, employment, refuge, homeland, redress of grievances, dominion. Moving persons may be engaged in tourism, escape, social protest, war, routine business, or fortune-seeking. All such forms of maneuver can usefully occupy ethnologists as they attempt to define, describe, and understand cultural formations, which are themselves constantly changing. We will reflect on the myriad acts of mobility that have taken shape at particular historical junctures through reading, writing, and discussion. Evaluations will be based on class participation, several short writing assignments, in-class exercises, and a term paper which addresses the term's concerns and tries to weigh them with the core issues in your chosen discipline.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Anthropology & The Body

Instructor(s): Melvin Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The mind cannot be seen or touched. It is subject to an array of social constructions as Freud and Jung demonstrate. Fossil human bones are bereft of life and emotion and allow a hobby-like avoidance. Non-human primates may be a diversion. Where are the anthropological descriptions of diverse human sex acts, death finales, and digestive behaviors (e.g., urination and defecation)? Why has anthropology avoided the "beef," the sex, death and digestion of healthy human bodies, except in Alice in Wonderland in "a simpler place and time?" Anthropologists are Human. They have bodies. What are they hiding under their clothes and beneath the masks? "Come back Sheba": "the real body, nature and place." In medical anthropology the body is ill. In cultural anthropology the body is "largely absent." In biological anthropology the body is silent. "What kind of body does society want?" "What kind of society does the body need?" This course examines sex, death, and digestion; race, age, and gender; and the biophobia hypothesis to grapple with what it means to be human, yesterday, today, and tomorrow. That elusive conception human nature is stared-down. The course ponders new directions in anthropology, new prescriptions health care, earth care, and embodied love to save the species. Its focus is human insecurity as a partial understanding of contemporary and future social problems. Come, have fun, and learn. The course will require two paperbacks, two essay exams, and a series of short presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Anthropology & American Culture

Instructor(s): Thomas Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu), Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an interdisciplinary course, focusing on the creation of Anthropology in American culture. Americans are "one out of many" e pluribus unum, as claimed on the coins that became common currency only after the Civil War. Anthropology, the comparative study of humans in all times and places, is based on our unity as Homo sapiens. American anthropology is unusually broad in scope, encompassing human biology and ecology, archaeology, linguistics and social-cultural anthropology, although the unity of these many forms of inquiry has never been more hotly contested than it is today. We are interested in how the distinctive features of American anthropology grew out of major social experiments and debates in American history, and how anthropologists in turn have contributed to these public debates, changing what we take to be "human" in the process. We will focus especially on debates over divine creation and natural history; over land rights, and whether "the earth ... should be made merchandise," as one Iroquois leader questioned in 1848; over "taxonomies," "races," and other classifications of humans (with and against animals and plants); over how to reform social relationships, and even create "communistic," "socialist," "utopian" and other kinds of communities; over how to document and analyze the organization of "society," as in the "social sciences" that began to emerge in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Finally we will ask how American cultural preoccupations and social practices concerning land, people, community, and society might be carried into American programs for the "development" of other countries abroad. By examining these interconnected processes, we hope to understand more about how we arrive at our generalizations, if not "truths," about human behavior, as well as deepen our understanding of particular people, places, and events. Our strategy for exploring major debates in fine detail is to focus on a particular region of the country that has also been an important global cross-roads for centuries: the Great Lakes region. In addition to reading primary documents on the history and ethnology of North America, we will be reading classic works in American anthropology, including writings by Frederick Douglass, Lewis Henry Morgan, Franz Boas, W.E.B. Du Bois, as well as works by several contemporary scholars. Students will have the opportunity to do comparable research and analysis in the Great Lakes area, or in areas they choose, using primary and secondary materials available in the ethnographic and historical collections and archives at the University of Michigan. Course requirements: This is a small, seminar-style course in which students can expect lots of reading for discussion in class, several writing assignments connected with an individual research project, and one, perhaps more, oral presentation(s) to the class of their chosen topic of research.

Grades: Grades will be based on class presentations and papers, as well as on class participation.

Reading: The required reading includes one book (Cronon's Changes in the Land), available at the Shaman Drum Bookstore (313 State Street), and on reserve in the Mischa Titiev Library in the Anthropology Department (2033 LS&A Building), and a course pack of excerpts and articles, available from Accu-copy (402 Maynard Street).

Preference will be given to students who have had at least one course in Anthropology or History.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 Indigenous Political Movements

Instructor(s): Stuart Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The emergence of the 'indigenous' as a political category and social movement has opened up new politics and debates about alternative forms of sovereignty in many parts of the world. This course examines the efforts of indigenous peoples to protect their autonomy, ensure their physical and cultural survival, and retain control over their natural resources. These social movements have the capacity to introduce new ideas into the public domain in a compelling fashion, presenting alternatives to the universalizing discourses of capital and rejecting the simplicity of approaches that seek to 'bottom-line' aspects of human behavior not amenable to economic accounting. The paradox of their position, however, is that in order to protect their rights, they must become global activists: the maintenance of difference in the political economy of contemporary culture requires movement and translation across cultural, political, and geographic boundaries. Working with these activists is a range of actors, each with their own agendas and resulting compromises for the communities that accept their support. This course explores the prospects and limitations of contemporary indigenous political movements, with particular attention to environmental issues. Topics include: the politics of representation and of culture; cultural property rights and 'conversions' between systems; alternative conceptions of nature, place, and time; social movements and identity politics; critiques of capitalism and science; and globalization. Examples will be drawn primarily from the Pacific, Southeast Asia and the Americas, with special emphasis on Melanesia and Amazonia. Prerequisites: one or two courses in Cultural Anthropology or permission of the instructor. Format: seminar. Readings: monographs and course pack. Requirements: substantial term paper, participation and presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 005 Native Peoples of the American Southwest

Instructor(s): L Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides a cross-disciplinary perspective on the origins, history, and current concerns of both pueblo and non-pueblo Native American groups living in the southwestern United States. We will contrast origin myths with archaeological perspectives, examine changes in traditional lifeways through ethnohistorical and anthropological accounts, discuss the impact of contact with people of European descent, and look at issues important to today's tribal governments. Lectures, readings, and discussions will incorporate materials from various disciplines, such as archaeology, history, cultural anthropology, and American Studies. The course has no prerequisites and is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Student evaluations will be based on a midterm, final, and research paper that focuses on a specific Native American group.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 459. Inequality in Tribal Societies.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in ethnology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is the principal locus of the production of inequality in human society? This has been an important concern of humanistic social thought since the Enlightenment. All those who have examined the problem have had recourse to consideration of relatively egalitarian pre-modern societies in which forms of hierarchy associated with the nation state and industrialized world economy are absent. These ethnographic cases provide a critical testing ground for general social theories of inequality because the latter explicitly or implicitly "predict" the social and economic configuration of the most egalitarian societies. Both received wisdom and recent theory have emphasized the production and circulation of accumulatable forms of wealth as the source of inequality. Unequal accumulation and relations of dependence and indebtedness are seen to follow inevitably from the sheer presence of wealth (which should thus be absent in egalitarian societies). The Marxian position holds that all social inequalities are grounded in the dynamics of a particular mode of production and are either directly generated by this or built-up upon core relations of inequality that are so generated. There should then be a one-to-one relation between economic inequality and social inequality (i.e., differential prestige, privilege and moral evaluation). Recent elaboration of this perspective sees social inequality as rooted in the social relations of production entailed by bridewealth systems in which senior males gain control over the labor of wives and junior males by their control of matrimonial goods. The exchange of persons for persons is also replaced by an exchange of persons for goods so that accumulation of wealth becomes a precondition for the reproduction of kin relations. If the evolutionary road to inequality is paved with bridewealth as this perspective suggests then egalitarian societies should lack marriage payments, for these are seen as a central locus for the production of inequality. The course will examine these issues. Format is part lecture, part seminar. Substantial term paper required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

Anthro. 491. Prehistory of the Central Andes.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101, 282, or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jpar/ant491/ANT491.htm

The development of pre-Columbian Andean civilizations, from the terminal Pleistocene (ca. 13,000 years ago) through the European contact period (16th century A.D.). Major emphasis is on the archaeological study of increasingly complex society after ca. 2500 B.C., from early agricultural and herding communities through the Inca empire, in the region between central Chile and Colombia. At least one course in basic anthropology is highly desirable.

Students will be evaluated on the basis of a take-home midterm exam (25%), a take-home final exam (50%) and a 10-15 page term paper (25%). Instruction is primarily lecture, although in-class discussion is encouraged. Textbook: Ancient South Americans, by Karen Olsen Bruhns. Cambridge University Press, 1996. Paperback edition $24.95. There will also be a small course pack of particularly useful journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 519(476)/Ling. 517/German 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah Thomason

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 543. Demographic Approaches in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Concept and Method of Cultural and Quantitative Studies

Instructor(s): Thomas Fricke (tomf@umich.edu), Elisha Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior or graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed as a survey of anthropological approaches to demographic research. Demography here is the study of life course transitions and familial relationships revolving around events as varied as birth, marriage, the establishment of households, migration, aging, and death. This course is concerned with conceptual assumptions and methods brought to bear on the understanding of these phenomena (e.g., defining marriage). It is designed to explore and develop mixed method approaches which give balanced attention to cultural and quantitative analysis in social research.

The course is theoretically and practically driven and is divided into three segments. Part one explores the conceptual assumptions of demography and anthropological demography. Part two is designed to develop models of anthropological demography through the examination of concrete case studies. Part three is concerned with the justification and procedures for using both qualitative and quantitative approaches in research. Students will be exposed to a variety of literatures: philosophy of social science, ethnography, and methodological materials for conducting research. These last include approaches to survey design in ethnographic context and ethnographic field techniques such a oral history, discursive interviews, and the writing of ethnographic fieldnotes. Although demography as defined above provides the substantive examples, this course should appeal to all students interested in combining cultural and behavioral analysis in their work. Coursework will involve lecture, discussion, brief essays, and help on proposal development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 9:35 AM on Fri, Apr 2, 1999.