Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in English (Division 361)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for English.


A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Winter Term 1998 is January 16, 1998.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.


Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 001, 011 Contexts of the Self

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of this writing course is literature of "the self." While "the self" may be generally taken to mean a locus of identity, such a general take settles no questions. What, after all, is an identity? Are identities shaped by society or is there a natural "self" that transcends (or is capable of transcending) the influence of society? Is society the enemy of the self? Is the "natural" self capable of evil? Is society what keeps the self's evil in check? Is there such a thing as sick self? If so, what might a healthy self be? Is change possible? These questions and more will be part of our reading of the course's texts. "Texts" in this course, however, means painting, music, and film, as well as novels, shorts stories, and plays.

Requirements: Class attendance & participation; four essays based on the reading (1000-1500 words/essay); one to two page critiques of other students' essays (the number of such critiques depending on the number of students enrolled); reading response papers.

Bibliography:
NOVELS: Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Walker, The Color Purple; from Spiegelman, Maus, "Prisoner on the Hell Planet."

SHORT STORIES: Carver, "What We Talk About When We Talk About Love". Anderson, "The Ugly Duckling". O'Connor, "Good Country People". Hemingway, "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber."

PLAYS & FILMS: Huang, M. Butterfly; Willington & Henry, The Graduate; from Moyers, Wounded Healers (non-fiction film); from Mun Wah, The Color of Fear (non-fiction film).

MUSIC-AS-POETRY: Simon & Garfunkel, "The Sounds of Silence" and "Mrs. Robinson". The Beatles, "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band."

PAINTINGS/MURALS: Orozco, The Gods of the Modern World; Magritte, La lunette d'approche.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 002, 027 The American Family

Instructor(s): Liesel Litzenburger (liesell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Family is, and historically has been, a prime subject for much of our country's most powerful and imaginative literature. In this course, we will explore the notion of the American family as it is presented and chronicled in works of twentieth century fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. We'll examine the ways American authors have presented us with diverse images of families, and we'll consider issues and themes common to all. During the term, we will read, extensively analyze, and discuss the various assigned works; in addition, you will be writing a number of both formal and informal papers. The basic elements of fiction, poetry, and memoir language, voice, theme, structure, etc. will be studied and applied throughout the term. One of the most important goals of this course is to help you consider yourself an able writer and insightful reader, capable of thinking independently and writing both analytically and creatively. Our class time will be devoted to developing a supportive community of critics and writers through meaningful reading, writing, and discussion.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Kirsten Herold (fogh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The short of it is that we will read some really good books, talk about them, write about them. Your interests will shape the course as much as mine. My interests include narrative, point of view, voice, and style. The work will be as student centered as possible expect no lectures, but plenty of group assignments.

Course texts may include, but not be limited to One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Room With a View, Mr. Vertigo, and Fifth Business, along with a handful of shorter fiction and non-fiction texts.

Required work: Faithful and enthusiastic attendance and participation, several short exercises, three 3-4 page papers, a midterm, and a final.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 004 The American Family: Shifting Perspectives in U.S. Drama

Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer (soferand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since its beginnings, drama in the United States has been obsessed with redefining the family and its broader relationship to society. In this course we will read a variety of plays centering on the American family and drawn from each decade of this century, so as to gain some historical perspective on the contemporary debate over "family values" and to stimulate our own writing and thinking about the limits and possibilities of "family." Our focus will thus be critical, not autobiographical.

Our readings will include plays by Tennessee Williams, Sam Shepard, Arthur Miller, Tony Kushner, Lorraine Hansberry, and others. While there will be much spirited discussion of the readings, our main focus will be the writing process itself; we will thus be workshopping student papers throughout the term. You should expect to do a great deal of writing, including two shorter essays; three longer essays; a reading log; and one to two page responses to your classmates' essays. Please note that regular class attendance and participation are required for a passing grade.

English 124 has two main goals: to improve your expository and analytical writing, and to introduce you to a theme or genre of literature (in this case, both). By the end of this course you should be able to write more clearly and confidently, and with increased complexity, about a range of texts and ideas.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsley (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

NOTE CHANGE OF INSTRUCTOR AND COURSE DESCRIPTION. Among the many types of stories out there in literature-land, the ones we best relate to often have as their subject the messy business of growing up. "Literary types" call this the "coming of age" motif, and it's this which we will be exploring in our reading of not-what-you'd-expect novels, stories, memoir and drama. Many, but not all, of these selections share the setting of student life, something which we should relate to even more. We will be journaling our responses to the readings, writing several one-two page pieces, and completing a variety of non-traditional assignments, but emphasis will be on developing reading and writing skills so that when we enter into each literary experience, we have with us a full kit of tools with which to talk about it. To that end two 3-5 page papers and one 7-10 page paper will also be required.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): John Fulton (jaus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will explore what it means to be an American through various novels and short stories. We will consider such well-known classics as the Great Gatsby and The Awakening as well as the work of some contemporary authors. The course work will consist of four analytical essays as well as a number of short response papers. You will also attempt to imitate the various styles of the authors we read in a few more creative assignments. As this course is mostly discussion based, please come prepared to share your insights regularly in a small and enthusiastic classroom setting.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 007, 009 The Ethics of Writing: Virtues and Vices

Instructor(s): Vincent O'Keefe

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This composition course will use literature primarily fiction and nonfiction as an avenue for improving critical thinking, reading, and writing. We will focus on the ethics of written discourse, or the virtues to display and the vices to avoid in our expository and argumentative strategies. Virtues that peer revision groups will explore in both the literature and, more importantly, each other's papers include reliable narration, sound analysis, and responsible argumentation. We will also develop effective rhetorical techniques relating to purpose, audience, organization, style, evidence, documentation, and academic conventions. Assignments will include four formal, revised essays of varying lengths (3-8 pages), peer critiques of each formal paper, several shorter exploratory papers, in-class exercises, and large and small group discussions.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 008.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 009 The Ethics of Writing: Virtues and Vices

Instructor(s): Vincent O'Keefe

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.007.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 010 Sharing Voices

Instructor(s): Sean Henne (hennes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The premise of this class is that reading, discussing, and writing about literature should involve the kind of trust that the word "sharing" brings to mind. Imagine a series of discussions about the individual's relationship to society, and imagine that you have a voice in those discussions along with such familiar folks as Emily Dickinson and Nathaniel Hawthorne and more contemporary writers like Galway Kinnell and Jamaica Kincaid. You will participate in these discussions by speaking, of course, but also by reading a wide variety of works (including each other's pieces), and by writing. Writing will include traditional analytical pieces as well as more experimental forays into the personal, through journal writing and creative writing. By sharing our voices we will discover what meanings can be made of literature through the kaleidoscopic lenses of our selves.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 011 Contexts of the Self

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.001.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 012 Making YourSelf Known

Instructor(s): Michele Herrman Champagne (mherrman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this introduction to college writing, we will dispense with the notion that successful academic writing requires the conformity to well-worn essay topics and formulaic points of view. Rather, the overarching goal of this course is to devise strategies for making your academic writing a public extension of your own personal passions, fascinations, and concerns. To attain this goal, you must learn to communicate your concerns to an audience to make yourSelf known clearly, precisely, and convincingly. To this end, a central aspect of the course will be the workshop, a forum for collaboration in which each student submits a polished piece of writing for class discussion. Readings for the course will be drawn from an eclectic group of literary works, ranging from nineteenth-century British novels to twentieth-century British and American essays, poems, and stories. The literature will serve as both models and subject matter for your much of your writing for the course. Writing requirements will include three formal essays of varying length, as well as a number of short exercises and weekly response papers. Above all, this course requires active and energetic early-morning engagement with the material and with each other.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 013 Literature in the Age of AIDS

Instructor(s): Christine Montross (stine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How has the AIDS epidemic shaped the literary voice of the last two decades? What forms of art and literature have felt the shockwaves of disease, and which, if any, have resisted them? In this course we will examine pieces which react, describe, recount, deny, agonize, mobilize, criticize, and attempt to make sense of AIDS and its repercussions. As this is a writing course, we will lend our own voices to the response and hope to uncover our own revelations about individual texts and about various aspects of the epidemic. The texts will cover a broad spectrum of voices and will include Push by Sapphire, Heaven's Coast by Mark Doty, Love Alone by Paul Monette, and Ruth Alexander Schwartz's Accordion Breathing and Dancing. There will be 20-30 pages of revised prose and several shorter writing assignments.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): John Young (jkyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will examine what it means to use the word "I" in a work of fiction; that is, we will consider the interaction between autobiography and narrative, two ostensibly opposite but actually intertwined modes of writing. This class will be writing-intensive: you will write 4-5 papers, including students' own autobiographical essays, with drafts and revisions for the first two papers. We will also devote a fair amount of class time to writing strategies and techniques in order to reach an under-standing of what it means to produce an English paper at the college level. Texts will include: Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Agatha Christie, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd; Gertrude Stein, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; and selected essays.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 015.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 016, 034 Narratives of the Midwest. Note: this section is no longer a First-Year Seminar section

Instructor(s): Stephanie Palmer (scpalmer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section you will read fiction, memoir, or poetry that draws on the idea of the Midwest in American culture by writers including Theodore Dreiser, Hamlin Garland, Caroline Kirkland, and Toni Morrison. We will think about what places and people count as "Midwestern" and what issues the term alludes to in a shorthand fashion whether the raw material of American goodness, social conformity, sexual repression, or simply not the South or not the Coast. Through careful reading and writing, you will examine why this regional identity matters. In the process you will also practice using words as powerful tools of thought and expression and increasing your awareness of the writing strategies used in college writing. After writing brief papers (3-5 pages) reflecting on your personal relation to the region or describing a place, you will produce two polished analyses of literary texts (4-6 pages each) and one long paper (6-8 pages) that synthesizes insights from the reading and your knowledge about a Midwestern or non-Midwestern place. Since you're in the Midwest for the time being, you will have valuable insights and a clear stake in this topic.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Scottie Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to develop your ability to interpret, discuss, and write about literary texts. For most of us, speaking in front of or writing for a group clarifies and deepens our thinking about what we have read. So you will have constant and varied opportunities to practice and thus improve these analytical, oral, and writing skills throughout the term in a collaborative classroom environment. We will read brief histories, letters, personal narratives, poetry, and public addresses written in North America before the Civil War in which a particular vision of "America" was being promoted. We will read early Spanish and British explorers, Puritan men and women, Native Americans, and African-Americans as well as Jefferson and Lincoln. In reading these texts and your own essays, we will think about the ways in which argumentation and description are intertwined; we will work on how to find an implicit argument in a description (of a landscape, a person or an event) and how to hone your own account of a text into an explicit argument. There will be written and oral responses to your peers' work, oral presentations on the reading, and four 4-6 page papers (including drafts). Because the course is designed as a small workshop, attendance and participation in class are essential for all.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 018, 026 Literature and Loss

Instructor(s): Rebecca Egger (egger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the ways in which twentieth-century writers have dealt with the concepts of loss and death, and with the challenges of living in a world bounded by the fact of mortality. Because all living persons are (by definition) alive, writing about death becomes an exercise in probing the unimaginable, the traumatic, and the taboo. By examining the variety of strategies that authors have developed to discuss this most elusive of subjects, we will explore and write frequently about such issues as mourning; memory; generational, familial and cultural connectedness; and the responsibility of the living to the dead. We will focus on novels (William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping, and Toni Morrison's Beloved), but will also study a nonfictional account (Elie Wiesel's Night ) and a small selection of poetry and essays. Students will write and revise four papers (3-6 pages each), participate in critiques of one another's work, and submit periodic short writing assignments. Though our subject is weighty, conversation should be lively and engaged; to that end, you should come to each class prepared to participate in discussion.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 019.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Joe Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As a framing theme, this course investigates the ways in which otherness and others (children, the poor, the undereducated, foreigners, exiles, non-middle-class Americans generally) are imagined in contemporary fiction. The goals of the course are to teach you methods of reading stories so as to develop your skills in attentive reading, critical thinking, and written analysis. Our readings and essays will focus on selected stories and novels from the United States, Canada, England, and Ireland. There will be short and long writing assignments amounting to approximately 30 pages of writing. Texts most likely to include Doyle, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha; Lodge, Out of the Shelter; Oates, Because It Is Bitter and Because It Is My Heart; Gaines, A Lesson before Dying; Schwartz, Leaving Brooklyn; and stories in Norton Anthology of Short Fiction.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsley (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.005.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 022.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Joe Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.020.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 025 "Take Physic". Reading and Writing about Renaissance Plays

Instructor(s): Gina Bloom (ginab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Are you afraid of Shakespeare? Interpreting literary texts can be enormously challenging, especially when these texts were meant to be performed by actors on a stage hundreds of years ago. How do we understand King Lear's challenge "Take physic, pomp/ Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel" when we are not used to early English and are not familiar with early performance contexts? Our historical and physical distance from Lear's words need not hinder our interpretation of them, however; in fact, noting textual strangeness is the first step towards reading any text responsibly, critically, and intelligently. And skilled writing about literature is only possible after thorough comprehension of the text at hand. To help you understand the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century plays you will read and write about in this class, we will constantly keep in mind how these plays might have been and can be produced and received. You need not ever have read Shakespeare to get something out of this course. All you need is the motivation to engage with the unfamiliar, the willingness to experiment with performance, and the confidence to think critically about your approach to reading and writing. Course requirements: active participation; frequent response papers; in-class presentations and informal scene performances; three major essays, and a final portfolio of revised work. To further develop your critical writing skills, you can expect to work with a peer partner. Through feedback from your peers and from the instructor, you will be able to define your personal reading and writing goals and devise strategies for attaining mastery over them.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 026 Literature and Loss

Instructor(s): Rebecca Egger (egger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.018.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 027 The American Family

Instructor(s): Liesel Litzenburger (liesell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.002.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the particular difficulties and pleasures Western women have experienced through and with their bodies, partly as a response to how those bodies are portrayed in art, advertising, and science. Reading such books as Patricia Foster's Minding the Body, Audre Lorde's Cancer Journals, and Margaret Atwood's The Edible Woman, we will discuss issues such as rape, women's sexuality, bodily self-images, eating disorders, pornography, breast cancer, and alternate forms of child birthing. Analyzing the connections between these other voices and our own experiences, we will complete several in-class writing assignments, 1-2 page reading responses, peer reviews of the works of other writers in the class, and two larger papers which combine the personal and the analytical. Students will also be asked to do a combination mini-lecture/paper on a subject of their own choice. This course should appeal to men students as well as women; it speaks to and of men's roles as fathers, sons, brothers, and lovers, as well as the ways in which our sexual mores, the media and mass consumerism, and the Western split between mind and body shapes our sense of self, our thoughts and our actions for both women and men. Because the topic of this course has such relevance for all of us, we will work together to hone our own skills as writers, as arguers, as sensitive and self-aware "readers" of our world. We will analyze arguments and advertisements, interview one another and at least one outside source, and participate in workshops related to the course topic. This class will be collaborative and learning; we share and explore our own experiences with others. The course thus requires active participation and energetic engagement.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 030 Contemporary African American Literature

Instructor(s): Shawn Christian (shawnac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As an art form and academic discipline, literature offers students the opportunity to examine the development of different social relationships. The writing for this section will provide students with practical experience in critical thinking, reading, and writing by exploring representations of individual/group experiences and the acquisition of knowledge as a result of those experiences, in contemporary African American poetry, novels, drama, and autobiography. As we read authors and works such as Langston Hughes' "Dream Variation," Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, Ntozake Shange's for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, or the Autobiography of LeRoi Jones, students will complete reader responses (1 to 2 pages) and participate in small group exercises examining major themes, characterization, and writing styles. Four, more comprehensive, papers (ranging from 5 to 8 pages) will ask students to analyze connections between the works and assess the representations of individuals gaining knowledge of themselves, those with whom they share common or different experiences, and the worlds in which they live.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Kirsten Herold (fogh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.003.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 032.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 033 Restricted To CSP Students

Instructor(s): Seto

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Palmer (scpalmer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.016.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 035.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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