Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in English 125 (Division 361)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for English.


A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Winter Term 1998 is January 16, 1998.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Sejal Sutaria (ssutaria@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

To think is to explore and to write is to discover. The process of writing offers an opportunity to think and learn about ourselves, our world, and our constantly changing relationship to it by practicing how to express what we perceive most effectively. As you enter the very new world of Michigan to celebrate the academic and personal independence and excitement of collegiate life, you will explore how your new ideas and experiences shape how you understand and relate to your new environment. You will find that college courses in the humanities, arts, social sciences, and sciences will challenge you to analyze information, and then develop, support, and express your own opinions to it in writing. In this course, we will actively discuss and write about selected essays, film, art, and music to introduce you to the type of ideas you might encounter in your other classes and work on skills for interpreting them. The more effectively you can think about information and interpret ideas in a clear, organized way, the easier writing will be. In turn, will also practice using the writing style college courses require so that you can express your own ideas most effectively. We will spend a significant portion of the course working together in class workshops to help one another learn techniques to make writing easier and more enjoyable. Since your opinions about the things you will encounter and your ways of expressing these opinions is very much a part of your person, I hope you will leave this course thinking that you are more aware of how your position new environment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 002 Problems and Issues in Documentary: Reclaiming the "Other".BR> Instructor(s): Phyllis Frus (frus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Recent documentary films (shown on video) provide the main topics for writing and research, but we will also engage the theoretical basis of the documentary mode and the various forms of argument made by film theorists, critics, and documentary filmmakers. Essays in the course reader explore the status of documentary and its techniques. Students will come into contact with different forms of "claim making" in the works studied and will be asked to demonstrate understanding of these models by summarizing, analyzing, and evaluating others' arguments and trying out some of these writers' strategies in their own work. This process of reflecting on process, product, and producer when we write, read, or view texts is called "reflexivity," one of the key terms of the course. Films studied take as subjects women, unions, radicals, 60s counterculture, interracial couples, and the civil rights, antiwar, and free speech movements. Course requirements will include 3-4 formal essays, totaling 20-30 pages, as well as a number of more informal assignments, such as "reading logs," written and oral critiques of the writings of other students, and active participation in peer group sessions and revising workshops.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Rich Gallagher

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Krista Homicz (khomicz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~khomicz/

NOTE: Change in Course Description. Have you thought about how you communicate your ideas, interpret information, and understand meanings in this world of emerging technology? Do you already find yourself having to write well-formed pieces of prose, letters, documents, and email messages on the spot using computers and electronic media? This course will help you to write with computers on site which, when learned, will help you achieve success with your college courses and future jobs. Not only will this course teach you practical means of reading and writing essays using electronic media, but will also take into account theoretical issues of how to read and write about our experiences in a world that employs such media. Our readings will emerge from different kinds of "texts" available in the world around us, such as videos, Internet, email, essays, literature, and visual artwork that will help you to thinkcritically about information you receive from types of media. In addition to learning to how to construct "texts" of your own as well-structured essays, you will use email to share many of our ideas and samples of our writing. So don't be shy of sharing your work. Since our experience of the world is learned through the sharing of media, our student-produced texts will also be the focus of many in-class workshops in which student writing will be discussed, critiqued, and revised within the context of a writing community. You will be expected to participate in class, be able to send work over email outside of class, write 4-5 essays of polished prose, and complete additional short writing assignments as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 005 Reading, Writing, and New Media

Instructor(s): Sean Pollack (seanop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hyper/

College Writing is (as the name suggests) a writing-centered, writing-intensive class meant to stimulate, hone, and develop the skills surrounding the production, manipulation, and interpretation of texts of all kinds. Daily, words and images (the printed page, advertisement, information and entertainment, the web), surround us. And every day we use them, consciously or not, for our own purposes. One of the purposes of this course is to become more conscious readers of the texts of the cultures and environments that we inhabit. To be conscious readers, for our purpose, means that we read and think critically and analytically about what we have read, not only as an end in itself, but to bring these critical skills to bear on our own thought, and finally, upon our own writing and use of texts. How do writers manipulate their audiences? How texts "find" their audiences? What structures of argument do writers and image-producers employ, and what do they tell us about the culture we live in? What structures of argument inhere in our own thoughts when we think and talk about issues that might be important to us?

We will use our access to the written word and text in many of its various forms to explore the ways that reading and writing are carried out. These practices, so basic to everyday life both in and outside college, are said to be in a critical period of transition, even revolution, as they were at the time of the invention of the printing press. Is this so? And if it is, what is the nature of this revolution? Or is this idea largely the invention of high-tech and mass-media conglomerates?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Maureen Aitken (aitkenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider urban culture by examining music, films, and a variety of readings about city life. We'll begin with stories defining your hometown, and consider how those relate to urban/suburban values expressed through movies such as Do the Right Thing and My New Gun. We'll study scholarly and popular readings to better analyze the source of urban tensions. Musical influences such as George Clinton, the Velvet Underground, and Puff Daddy will help us see how artists are celebrating their environments, while at the same time questioning the status quo. We'll participate in group discussions, critique the writing of other students, and revise papers before turning in the final drafts. Expect to write a total of 20-30 pages of revised, graded prose by the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Miriam Burstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce you to the various kinds of academic essays that you will be asked to write throughout your college career. Through the process of writing and re-writing, you will hone your grammatical skills, refine your sense of form and style, and develop your critical abilities. As an essay is always written to be read, we will rely extensively on peer review and in-class writing exercises to understand what "writing to an audience" means. Needless to say, your presence and participation are essential for everyone's success. Requirements: short weekly readings, six formal essays of 4-6 pages each, critical responses to your classmates' essays, several in-class assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 008, 029 Restricted To Students in the 21st Century Program

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng125.html

The goal of this course is to bring you into the academic conversation by helping you develop your reading and writing skills. For your assignments, you will have the opportunity to write about a range of issues that transcend the academic disciplines: "Campus and Community," "Work and Play," "Media, Technology, and Literacy," and "Ethics, Law, and Justice" will be among the many topics you'll choose from. The course text provides many essays you may use as sources for your writing, but you'll also be encouraged to bring in sources from research and from non-school reading, viewing, etc.

While you'll have freedom to choose among topics and sources, you won't be writing alone. Count on having plenty of feedback frequent peer conferences and student-instructor meetings as you draft and revise your essays. You will also participate in a collaborative writing project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 009.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 010 The Essay as Laboratory: Experimental Reading and Writing

Instructor(s): Josh Lavetter-Keidan (jkeidan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we'll be looking at the works of four very different authors. Each of these writings will be experimental: each writer pushes boundaries and conventions as s/he explores different ways to make connections and meaning. As a writer, you'll be challenged to write experimentally, trying on the different techniques these writers display, working with different voices and styles. In addition, you'll perform more conventional writing, as you critique these writers. Expect to be writing at least one paper or revision per week, plus numerous shorter assignments, all of which will become part of the portfolio on which you'll be graded. Plan on re-reading, re-thinking and revising, working with peers to challenge and support one another as writers. Throughout, we'll be considering how we communicate how do the choices we make as writers help make a point, or convince an audience?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 011 A World of Ideas

Instructor(s): John Ponyicasanyi (johnpony@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course seeks to prepare you to write college papers on a range of topics. Readings will include works by several thought-provoking writers, addressing topics such as justice, wealth, the mind, nature, government, culture, and poetics. All readings, discussions, and writing will be aimed at developing ideas and applying them to challenging, persuasive essays: in short, papers you will most likely be asked to write for your other courses. We will also discuss writing as it is used in different disciplines. The requirements will include reading responses, peer critiques, lively participation, and essays, of varying length, that will add up to 20-30 pages of revised prose.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 012 Seductions, Persuasions, and Ideologies

Instructor(s): Susanna Ryan (seryan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do advertisements provoke desire? How does a satirist use humor to make a political statement? Why might a cultural product like a movie use a romance plot to get across an ideological message? In this course, we'll investigate the various means of getting a point across, and the ideologies implicit and explicit in a number of different kinds of textual media (e.g., the essay, the novel, the film). We'll pinpoint the strategies of persuasion and argument in such texts, and engage with critics' analyses of them; thus, our in-class discussions and debates will comprise a major part of the course. Our focus above all, however, will be on your own ability to construct a convincing argument, in the form of an analytical essay. Throughout the term you'll have the opportunity both to experiment with a number of different styles of argumentation, and to hone your critical skills through the process of writing and revision. Assignments will include a number of short, informal papers; a class presentation; and 20 to 30 pages of formal essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 013.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Meg Lynch (mlynch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As I see it, reading, writing, and thinking are all intricately intertwined. First of all, reading: it is not only the action of running your eyes over printed letters on a page, but also how you chose to interpret those letters and words, and what you choose to do with them. You read a book, but you also read a face, read a situation, read the world around you. Writing is about how you choose to express your readings, convey your interpretations, what bits of your readings you choose to pass on, and how.

In this course we will concentrate on how lives are read and written, and the choices and ramifications implicit in these readings and writings. Your writings will stem from readings of several essays and stories, all of which I categorize under Ralph Ellison's term "autobiographical exploration." We will examine the varying ways in which each of these writers chooses to see (think, read, write), and how in turn each of these perspectives can re-write how we see (think, read, write) our own lives in the world around us. At the same time, you will learn proficiency in various ways of seeing, reading, thinking, and writing, and practice choosing the appropriate methods for the purpose you want your writing to serve.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 015.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Simon Hyoun (shyoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to close reading, critical thinking, and argumentative writing at the university level. Implied is the belief that these elements are not exclusive of one another, and are best learned simultaneously. The course will require four formal, revised papers of shorter (3-5 pages) and longer (5-7 pages) length, for a total 20 to 25 pages of polished prose, as well as shorter essays responding to each week's assigned reading. Early drafts of papers will be discussed in class, in a workshop format, or privately with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 017 Rock Stars and American Culture

Instructor(s): Bill Hogan (wph@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The figure of the rock star has been a powerful presence in the American cultural landscape. From Elvis and the Beatles through Michael Jackson, Madonna, and "anti-rock stars" like Kurt Cobain and Marilyn Manson, our culture has tended to create larger-than-life media heroes in the world of popular music. As a cultural phenomenon, rock stars represent a point of intersection for large social questions about youth identity, social rebellion, gender, race, and mass entertainment. In this section, we will think and write about this quintessentially American creation. We will search for the cultural roots of the contemporary rock star in nineteenth century American Romantics like Thoreau and Whitman, trace their development through early twentieth century blues singers, and consider the role of rock music and musicians in contemporary life.

As a writing course, our major goal will be to develop sophisticated thinking and express it in lucid, vigorous prose. To this end, students will write and revise four major essays, and will complete frequent shorter writing assignments, both in and out of class. As a group, we will spend full class sessions "workshopping" at least one paper written by each student. Further, students will write peer critiques of each others' writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Angela Balla (aballa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In what sense does how we write authorize what we write? How do we coax, persuade, inspire, and coerce our readers with the form of our writing, and not just with its content? And in what ways might our selection of different genres, conventions, and styles themselves transform what we say, rather than simply "adorn" it? In this class we will investigate the relationship between power and language between and across academic disciplines, genres, and styles. Possible readings include selections from Adrienne Rich, Sir Philip Sidney, Martin Luther King, Jr., Gloria Anzaldua and bell hooks. By drafting and polishing 20-30 pages, as well as writing responses to readings and completing several shorter assignments, students will gain a sense of revision as another mode of transformation, one which enables them to develop fluency, flexibility, and greater grace in their writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Shawn Durrett (sdurrett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory course is designed to help you explore and refine your reading and writing of prose, and introduce you to critical thinking and communicating at the University level. While the focus of the course will primarily be on your writing, we will read various published works to examine and discuss the choices a writer makes, as well as what specific techniques he or she employs for effective communication. We will focus on using words as efficient tools, how to develop and maintain a style of voice and expression that enhances your ideas, as well as how to best support those ideas through use of concrete evidence. Some essay styles we will examine and work with include critical analysis of a specific text, personal narrative, and argumentative or persuasive angles about a particular issue or topic. You will not only refine your skills as a writer, but also as a reader, editor, and critic through in-class workshops where you will share your work with each other to gain feedback and specific suggestions for revision, as well as consider such issues as form, purpose, audience, tone, content, and support. Requirements include class participation and attendance, completion of reading assignments and peer critiques, in-class writing assignments and 4-6 essays. By the end of the term you will have 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose, and will have expanded your technical and thematic range, and better understand the tools for effective written communication.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Susan Gorman (gormans@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing and the ability to write effectively will shape the nature of your academic college experience. The skill of writing is necessary to whatever discipline you may pursue, whether that be in the humanities or sciences. If you are able to construct arguments and explain your positions convincingly using evidence, then you will be adequately equipped with the tools required for undergraduate success.

In this course, you will work on writing, reading and understanding arguments. You will gain a great amount of experience in writing, revising and critiquing papers. In class, we will discuss what makes writing strong or weak (i.e. rhetorical devices, language, argumentation) and a variety of technical aspects (i.e. bibliographic citations, plagiarism, etc.) with the aim of understanding that which makes an excellent paper. We will focus on the revising and rewriting of written work through workshopping sessions in small groups.

The writing and reasoning skills which you will utilize in this class will be useful in all the courses you will take at the University of Michigan. In each department and class, you will need to think through arguments and present them in clear language. Lab reports, historical research papers, sociological reports and analyses of poetry all must be written effectively in order to be best understood by your audience. This class will help you to examine your own writing along with its strengths and weaknesses. That ability to examine and polish your own writing style will be critical to all your other classes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Eileen Morgan (emmorgan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of "College Writing" is to introduce you to a variety of reading, writing, and thinking strategies that will better enable you to meet the challenges of future academic writing tasks. Accordingly, this course will provide you with instruction in and opportunities to practice strategies for reading texts with understanding (including techniques for annotating, paraphrasing, and summarizing texts); strategies for explaining concepts, evaluating and comparing texts, analyzing causes and effects, and proposing solutions to problems; and strategies for developing your own argument on an issue using outside sources. To this end, most formal writing assignments in this class (i.e., microthemes and essays) will require the use of at least one outside source.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 022.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Eileen Morgan (emmorgan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.021.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 024, 027 Memory and the Narrative Project

Instructor(s): Ian Reed Twiss

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to develop your ability to write and think clearly and convincingly. The primary focus will be on your work: each student will write four different essays (narrative, evaluative, argumentative and analytical). We will read and discuss published essays for you to model your work after, as well as some literature for analysis. The class and I will offer constructive criticism of your work in a workshop discussion format. You will then revise an essay at the end of the semester. Issues of grammar will be stressed. Besides your work as a writer, your work as a peer- editor and your contributions to class discussions and workshops will be important. In addition, smaller in-class writing assignments and some journal writing will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Deborah Smith (delsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Why write a personal essay? "My father reads the dictionary every day. He says your life depends on your power to master words" (Arthur Scargill, Journalist). All writings are acts of manipulation. The exercise of writing or speaking is also an act of revealing one's individuality; you express your identity by the way you choose to manipulate the English language from its perfect state to convey your particular insights and feelings. In this class we will debate media-exploited cases (Louise Woodward, etc.), autobiographical and non-fiction texts, and a selection of short stories and poems to give you the tools to master the essay form. The personal essay is argumentative in nature. We will discuss how the persuasive and argumentative essay forms make use of personal experience to contain and enlarge an argument. Course readings will guide us in answering the pertinent questions: why do writers lie and/or manipulate, and how can your voice be a weapon in this media-fixed age. Course requirements: three revised essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Katy Halverson

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 027 Memory and the Narrative Project

Instructor(s): Ian Reed Twiss

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.024.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 028 This section is restricted to students in the Comprehensive Studies Program.

Instructor(s): Catherine Seto (catset@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 029 Restricted To Students in the 21st Century Program

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng125.html

See English 125.008.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Will Barnard (wbarnard@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~wbarnard/

The essay is a powerful and flexible tool one that you will be called upon to use in many of your classes at the University. In writing papers for your classes, you will be participating in a diverse community of writers, readers, and thinkers. You participate by understanding and responding to the ideas of others; by developing your responses, insights, and interpretations; and by shaping these into essays, which communicate your own ideas and insights to others in a clear and convincing way.

In this class, you will hone your skills as a participant in these University discourses by developing your skills as a critical reader and writer. You learn to write by engaging with the thoughts and writings of others whether they be the writers we will read in a textbook, or the writers sitting next to you in class. Through your reading, interpretation, and discussion of these essays you will develop your skills as a critical reader. By writing and revising your own prose, you will work on crafting clear and compelling essays that effectively communicate your ideas to the diverse audiences that compose the University.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Phoebe Jackson (pjack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will help you prepare for the type of thinking and writing that you will need to be successful at the university. Our first step will be to engage our thinking of critical issues by reading short non-fiction and fiction pieces. To improve your writing, you will write one-page reading responses for each article you read and four papers of polished prose. All of your papers will go through multiple drafts before an individual paper is finalized. To increase your ability to analyze text and to help your peers improve their written communication, you will be expected to read and comment upon early drafts of their papers. Your final grade will be based upon active class participation (which includes reading responses, peer responses, and multiple drafting) and four formal essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 032 Magazine Writing

Instructor(s): Brandi Lewis (brlewis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will focus on professional magazine writing skills. We will learn what devices writers use to reach their audiences and how to use these same devices in our own essays. Assignments will include the argumentative, the contemplative, and the ironic essay, and with each activity we will broaden our understanding of what makes some writing effective and some not so effective, focusing largely on style, topic, and point of view. Class reading assignments will include current magazine articles ranging from the politically charged to personal non-fiction. By the end of the course each student should expect to produce 20 to 30 pages of revised, polished work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): John Fulton (jaus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will read a wide variety of texts short stories, essays, poems with the aim of considering them as "made things" and analyzing their parts in order to see how they have been constructed. Interpretation will not be the focus of this course. Instead, we will ask what sort of rhetorical devices the author uses to "make" his or her text. How does the author use nouns, verbs, adjective, metaphor and what sort of text results from the way the author employs these devices? How is a piece of fiction constructed differently from an argumentative essay and how is an argumentative essay constructed differently from a movie review or a critical or scientific essay? Our own writing will proceed from imitating the work we read in class. Come prepared for lots of reading, discussion, in-class as well as out-of-class writing. We will write four full length essays, two of which must be thoroughly revised. We will also use a workshop setting to evaluate the work we produce.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Sarah Frantz (frantzsj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How would an alien society evaluate our popular culture if given the chance? What would they think of the Nike Swoosh, of the Wu Tang Clan, of the Lilith Fair, or of a well-read copy of Huckleberry Finn? This course will improve both your analytical reading skills and your argumentative and persuasive writing skills by examining and analyzing the unnoticed popular culture that constantly surrounds us our clothes, music, TV, books, films. We will be using email extensively in our responses to the assigned readings, and by the end of the term you will be able to analyze your cereal box and will possess a portfolio of 20-30 pages of brilliant, well-polished, argumentative prose.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Christopher Matthews (cmatt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will help you develop the writing and the thinking skills you will draw upon in the rest of your college career: you will become familiar with strategies of analysis and critical thinking which will allow you to participate in the intellectual community of the university and beyond. In addition, much of what we read will focus on analyzing culture, politics, and media through the lenses of race, gender, and class. These are some of the themes that have become very important to a great many members of the university community, and our work with these ideas will contribute to your familiarity with some of the most important issues shaping the discussions within our intellectual community.

The course's reading will allow you to experience the strategies and voices of many authors writing many different kinds of essays; our reading will also give you the opportunity to develop the critical thinking skills crucial to your ability to write clear, insightful, persuasive analytical essays. Both the phrase "critical thinking" and the word "analytical" represent the heart of this course, which is designed to develop the skills of a reader and writer who can analyze and critique, clarify and complicate, uncover logical fallacies, and develop intriguing nuances.

Coursework will include a variety of writing assignments: short and long analytical papers, a research paper, and peer critiques. At the end of the term you will hand in a portfolio consisting of approximately twenty pages of revised, polished writing, representing your progress over the course of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 036.

Instructor(s): Enid Zimmerman (jojess@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 037 Restricted To CSP Students

Instructor(s): Enid Zimmerman (jojess@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Belinda Kremer (belindak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Reel the reader in!"

Yes, I'm talking to you. The imperative above reflects your task, always, as a writer: keep the reader engaged. Make the reader want to keep reading. In this section of English 125: College Writing, you will concentrate first on "Writing," then on the modifier "College." By the time we get to "College," you will have engaged your creative, analytical, critical, intuitive, humorous, serious, and committed writerly personas, and here's the secret you will remain engaged with the whole gang as you fine-tune various approaches to persuasion, argument, inquiry, and the rest of the wide and compelling world of writerly rhetoric. Coursework includes attentive reading of assigned texts and active participation in class discussions and workshops, a reading-response journal, frequent writing exercises, papers and revisions, and an oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 039 Writing Fiction, Writing Non-Fiction: Placing the Self in Context. This section is restricted to students from the 21st Century Program

Instructor(s): George Cooper (geob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course should be thought of as a course in memoir, the undertaking of which will involve students in writing their own non-fiction and examining the line where memoir crosses over to fiction. We will concern ourselves with the way professional and student writers render their experience and will study how fiction can tell a true story as well as how non-fiction is dependent upon an author's ability to render an event truly, if not always factually. In conducting this inquiry we will also examine how Purpose, Audience, and Event influence the appropriate or effective construction of a piece of writing and how the rhetorical techniques of narrative, exposition and argument are employed, often together, to achieve a writer's goal. Readings will be drawn from the work of Toni Morrison, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Annie Dillard, Maxine Hong Kingston, Alfred Kazin, and Philip Roth. The students will write their own memoir in a series of installments. The emphasis of the memoir is not just on the individual, but on rendering the values, time and place which give incidents meaning. In conjunction with the writing of memoir, students write two take home, argumentative essays of 5-6 pages that address issues that arise from the readings and class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Jee Yoon Lee (jeeylee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to help you become critical readers and writers of ideas at the college level. You will be reading from a selection of essays ranging from issues of justice, government, wealth, the mind, nature, and culture. As you read these essays, you will see how the different writers establish their ideas the development of argument, the tone, the structure, the technique in these essays. You will discuss how their choices effectively or perhaps ineffectively convey their ideas and how you as writers can achieve similar or better effects with your own written ideas. As a way to develop your writing skills, you will be expected to write 20-30 pages of revised and polished prose. You will learn versatile skills by writing essays varying from 1-10 pages. Other requirements for the course are class participation and peer critiques. Overall, the focus of the course is developing ideas and better strategies for reading and writing through a process of rethinking, rewriting, and revising.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Nirmala Singh (nsingh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed, in workshop fashion, to develop reading, writing, and thinking as interconnected skills. These skills constitute varying phases of the same never-ending yet endlessly productive process. This course emphasizes awareness and understanding: while reading a series of essays and basing their discussions and papers on these readings, students will be encouraged to reflect on the mechanics, functions, and manipulations of language. Course requirements include five revised papers (four pages in length), a journal (ten pages in length), one-page peer critiques for workshop discussions of first drafts, and mandatory attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Therese Stanton (theresem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this class is to help you write better. To achieve this goal, you will explore a variety of ways of getting writing done freewriting, focused freewriting, public informal writing, collaborative writing, and revision) and practice many styles of writing (essay, informal persuasion and formal argument, and nonadversarial argument). We will also study a bit of background and theory to help you understand that writing can produce ideas and experiences as well as record them. Each week, some class time will be dedicated to grammar and reasoning. Required Text: Coursepack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Cari Carpenter (carimc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As Willa Cather once wrote, "There are only two or three human stories, and they go on repeating themselves as fiercely as if they had never happened before." What are the stories that we tell time and time again? Who are they about, and who do they leave out? Who gets to tell them, and how and why do they get told? Examining stories by such diverse individuals as Thomas Jefferson, Horatio Alger, and Alice Walker, you will not only take up such questions, but learn how to become a better storyteller yourself. The goals of this class will be threefold: first, to analyze and critique some of the fundamental stories that make up the fabric of American history and culture; second, to develop original "stories" in a variety of forms; and third, to learn how to collaborate with others while composing and revising different kinds of writing. Requirements: 25-30 pages of revised, polished prose, including a personal narrative, comparison/contrast writing, and an essay with an original argument. Your active participation in small and large workshops, revision of writing material, and engagement with assigned texts will be essential to your success in and enjoyment of this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 044 Writing About Film

Instructor(s): Lizzie Hutton (ehutton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The premise of this introductory composition class is that all essay writing whether in the form of the personal reflection or the more academic critique is argumentative, and requires both a clarity of expression and a rigorous use of evidence. Taking film as our subject, we will explore the many different approaches the writer can take in responding to art. Requirements will include four papers of varying lengths, all to be carefully revised with the help of group workshops and private conferences, and a weekly journal, as well as film viewings and readings from a course pack. Students will end the term with a twenty page collection of polished essays, each exhibiting a different mode of discussing the movies watched. I encourage strong opinions and insist upon careful, muscular thinking; I believe that anyone with an interest in their subject can learn to write colorful and persuasive prose.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Robin Morrissey (rmorriss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will focus on merging the academic with the personal voice. Drawing on a variety of contemporary issues, from popular to not-so-popular culture, we will derive four responsive essays the personal, the compare and contrast, the analytic, and the argument. Authors will include Michel Foucault, Alice Walker, Ralph Ellison, Adrienne Rich, and Joyce Carol Oates. We will spend time workshopping papers, doing exercises to strengthen our weak points, and discussing elements of clarity, content and style. There will be two graded portfolios, one at the midterm and another at the end of the term. These portfolios will include your revised papers and completed exercises. Expect to complete 20-30 pages of revised papers, each of varying length.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 046.

Instructor(s): Rich Gallagher (rmorriss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Andrea Kaitany (akaitany@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A workshop format will characterize this introduction to college writing and reading. Students should be prepared to participate in small and large group readings and editing workshops as well as class discussions of published essays. The focus of instruction will be the rhetorical strategies students are most likely to encounter and find useful in further college work. The issues of audience and purpose, who one is writing for and what effect one wishes to have on this reader, will be a central theme of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Sri Mukherjee (srim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims at introducing you to college writing. Integral to the course is the idea that critical reading and strong writing are interdependent activities. You will require expertise in both these areas to succeed at most stages of your college careers and beyond. In this course, therefore, you will critically analyze compositional strategies of professional writers and learn to write clear, persuasive arguments on contemporary socio-cultural issues. This course emphasizes the communal aspects of writing and learning: regular attendance and active participation in discussion and peer-editing workshops are mandatory for a passing grade. There will be weekly readings from course reader and course pack, four formal papers of 3-6 pages, peer critiques, and shorter writing exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Maureen Aitken (aitkenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): John Young (jkyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will cover the fundamentals of effective college writing, with special attention to the thesis paragraph and the use of examples and evidence. We will use our reading assignments as models to analyze professional writers' styles and structures of arguments. Through a series of student papers, we will break down the writing process into its main components. Early in the term students will write and revise drafts in order to establish themselves as clear and confident college-level writers. The second half of the class will focus on student-initiated research projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Genesis Downey (gdowney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Analytical writing is not something a person inherently knows how to do. It is a learned thing. This implies that in order for one to become proficient in writing, it needs to be worked at. This course will provide the tools that will allow for the kind of proficiency in writing that is needed if one is to communicate ideas effectively at the university level. This course will consist of frequent formal and informal writing exercises that will add up to 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose by the end of the semester. By utilizing various authors' essays, in class brainstorming sessions, films and workshops, it is hoped that the student will walk away from the class with a better understanding of how this process of communication works.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Petra Dreiser (pdreiser@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary objective of this course is to assist you in your development as a writer. Contrary to what many of you may think, the demand for clear, coherent, and forceful writing extends far beyond the halls of the English Department. Intricately linked to the acts of reading and critical thinking, mastery of the craft of writing will provide you with a whole new approach of understanding the world. And the assumption that writing is a craft that can be learned and must be practiced lies at the heart of this course. We will learn specific rhetorical strategies and their consequences from the texts we read in class and ultimately try to incorporate them into our own work. We will also see how writers can (and must) vary their voices in order to achieve a particular goal, or reach a specific audience. Both audience awareness and the ability to look at problems from multiple perspectives represent invaluable resources for academic and professional success. To be sure, the task of writing with proficiency is a trying one, demanding constant rethinking and revision. Many of our class activities will be geared toward these two forms of rewriting, and by the end of the term, all of us will not only have developed into better writers and readers, but also into better critics and editors of other people's prose. You can expect to have completed 20-30 pages of final, graded prose by the term's end.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Alyson Tischler (alysont@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

I and the Village (1911) is the title of a painting by Marc Chagall. This painting is suggestive of the complex ways in which our identities are defined and constructed through the communities in which we live. In this course, we will consider the relationship between the individual and his/her community. Our treatment of this subject will take two forms. First, the reading and writing assignments are structured around the theme of the relation between the individual and community. Secondly, we will explore the relation between the individual and the community as we consider the University as a village. If we were living in Chagall's village, we would probably observe its rituals: we would go to the market on market days and we would make sure our goats did not wander onto our neighbors' fields. Similarly, in the university village, we must abide by certain conventions in our writing. This course aims to help you to master these conventions. But conforming to these conventions does not mean that your writing must become conventional: we will discover ways of incorporating our creativity into our essays. By carefully considering the relationship between "I" and the "village," our essays will balance our unique voices with the conventions of the university. Ultimately, we will find ways to put ourselves into our essays while we write in the modes that carry authority and are taken seriously in the university community. The assignments include an argumentative essay, a group observation, and a group history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Miriam Burstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.007.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Rana Jaleel (rmjaleel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In order to write well, you must not be afraid to write badly, but you must be afraid to settle. This class can help. Over the term, we will explore several types of essays, including argumentative writing and textual analysis, with a special emphasis on the remarriage of personal narrative to a larger social and/or psychological context. We will focus on developing and refining individual writing styles as well as flexing and toning our critical thinking abilities. Expect to write 20-30 pages of polished prose, revisions of these essays, and in-class exercises for the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 058 Writing the Visual, Visualizing the Written

Instructor(s): Petra Dreiser (pdreiser@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary objective of this course is to assist you in your development as a writer. But we should never consider the craft of writing as one isolated from the acts of reading and critical thinking. Reading, for instance, demands more of us than to simply run our eyes across letters on a page; it also requires that we interpret what we see, that we categorize in our minds and try to make sense of the sentences in front of us. And of course we read much more than words and phrases. Images, faces, situations all must be read (i.e., interpreted) in order to be understood. Writing, then, represents one possible way of expressing these "readings" and of interpreting the visual signs that surround us day by day. This course will place special emphasis on this connection between the visual and the written. In looking at and analyzing visual representations ranging from photographs to comic strips and fashion (participants in the class will have some say as to what kind of visuals they would like to talk and write about), you will refine your writing skills, and gain proficiency both as writers and readers of the world around you. You can expect to have completed 20-30 pages of final, graded prose by the term's end.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 059 The Ethics of Critical Reading and Writing

Instructor(s): Vincent O'Keefe

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This composition course will focus on critical thinking, reading, and writing, with an emphasis on the ethics of written discourse. The course entails identifying and exploring ethical questions involving such topics as civil rights, the media, and the educational system. We will practice identifying multiple points of view on an issue; generating and developing our own perspectives and positions; articulating our thoughts in convincing sentences, paragraphs, and essays; and summarizing, documenting, and responding to others' texts responsibly. Peer revision groups will study numerous pieces of writing, some by professional writers, many by classmates. In the process, we will develop effective rhetorical techniques relating to purpose, audience, organization, style, evidence, and academic conventions. Assignments will include four formal, revised essays of varying lengths (3-8 pages), peer critiques of each formal paper, several shorter exploratory papers, in-class exercises, and large and small group discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Sri Mukherjee (srim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.049.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 061.

Instructor(s): Katy Halverson

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Laura Kopchick (lkz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed as a survey of written composition focusing specifically on formal attributes (sentence and paragraph structure, thematic development, logical discourse). Students focus on developing their own writing through several types of essays (including personal narrative, descriptive, and argumentative essays), group peer evaluation, and class discussion while developing critical reading and editing skills. Each student will write five papers from 3-7 pages in length and will have ten peer critiques. A final portfolio of approximately 30 pages of polished prose will be turned in at the end of the term. Although the main focus of the course will be on student writing and revision techniques, we will examine the relationship between reading and writing with the text Reading Critically, Writing Well as well as essays from Annie Dillard, E.B. White, and David Foster Wallace.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Ed Pontee (pontee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to make you a proficient writer armed with a critical mass of critical thinking skills. The class will require a considerable number of visions and re-visions (as T.S. Eliot would have it) for that paramount piece of prose. We will consider those tools of the trade (stylistic choices, organization, voice, etc.) that you can use effectively in the craft of writing and will examine the issues that go into and arise from your creative efforts. We will discuss the work of your fellow students to provide discerning, constructive criticism, but more importantly, to discover those wonderful moments of connection among the writer, the text, and the reader. In fact, voracious readers make compelling writers; therefore, we will carefully examine individual pieces by an eclectic variety of authors. To name a few samples: Michel Foucault, Paulo Freire, Stephen Greenblatt, Joyce Carol Oates, Alice Walker, Virginia Woolf, etc. Work requirements: significant contributions to class discussion with regard to readings and workshops, weekly writing exercises, four or five papers of varying lengths that should amount to a total of 20-25 pages of revised and stunningly convincing prose.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 064.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Su Fang Ng (ngsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing is like exploration. We enter into unfamiliar territory, be it in terms of subject matter or writing techniques. The fun comes from learning to be acute observers of something new and acquiring skills, including that of reporting to the uninitiated what we have discovered and demonstrating our new competence. Because this course aims to introduce you to college-level reading and writing, we emphasize analytical thinking, critical reading of texts, and writing argumentative essays. Our readings from Bartholomae's Ways of Reading come from a range of humanistic disciplines, and we for the way they make their arguments. How do we know what we know? How do we make meaning and communicate language? You will write five formal essays, which will have been peer-reviewed in workshop and extensively revised. There will also be informal writing, including responses to the readings, freewriting and in-class exercises, and a class presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s): Julia Carlson-Federhofer (jcarlson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Engaged in our own effort to craft convincing and provocative essays, this class of afternoon scholars will examine the ways in which artists from a variety of academic (and not so academic) disciplines develop, shape and deliver their messages. How does a parallel narrative structure enable a critique of plastics? How does a constellation of Greek figures inform an experience of consuming French fries? How might a critic of science arrange media images of the immune system to expose a myth about the self?

Taking inspiration from Margaret Atwood, Roland Barthes, Wendell Berry and others, you will produce four pieces of clear and purposeful prose. Class time will be devoted to discussion, vocabulary enrichment, and activies such as peer revision and production of a class publication.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 067.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 068.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 069.

Instructor(s): Joe Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 070.

Instructor(s): Joe Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 11:27 AM on Fri, Feb 5, 1999.