Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in English (Division 361)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for English.


A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Winter Term 1998 is January 16, 1998.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.


Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 Gender and Popular Culture. Meets with Women's Studies 150.002

Instructor(s): Sally Robinson (sallyr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Romance fiction, that most "feminine" of genres, is often derided as the lowest of low culture: trashy, trivial, even dangerous. In this seminar, we'll approach this broad topic by exploring the gender of, as well as the gender in, romance. What kinds of femininity and masculinity do romances construct as ideal? As monstrous? We'll look at "straight" examples of romance (perhaps Austen's Pride and Prejudice, a mass-market Harlequin, The Bridges of Madison County, Disney's Beauty and the Beast); and parodies or revisions of the genre (Bridget Jones's Diary, Faye Weldon's The Life and Loves of a She-Devil, Margaret Atwood's Lady Oracle, the film True Lies, perhaps); some critical essays on romance. Seminar members will be responsible for presenting work to the class, and will do research via the Internet, popular magazines, self-help books, television, or film, to broaden the class's investigation. Vigorous participation, two short papers, one longer paper.

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Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 003 Of Human Bonding: The Art of Friendship

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is intended as an introduction to the University as a community of discussion. The course is a seminar, a structure which asks active participation both orally and in writing. Our discussion will focus this term on "Arts" of friendship, those works which define and explore personal bondings formed by choice. These works will raise issues of social class, of economic rank, of age, gender, and taste as either helps or impediments to friendship. Authors or artists whose works will form the basis of discussion will include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Michelangelo, Montaigne, Bacon, Whitman, Douglas, Woolf, and Toni Morrison. Writing: informal writing each week; more formal writing every other week throughout the term. Each student will make a seminar presentation; there will be a seminar-style final examination.

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Engl. 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 001 The Memoir As Art and Remembrance

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The art of the author's personal memory, whether taking the form of autobiography, fiction, drama or film, has found great favor in recent years. Examples from several genres will help us study the importance of memory and the artistic forms it can take. We will try to determine what these varied works have to say about the individuals recalling their life and times. Possible authors and filmmakers: R. Baker, T. Williams, Atwood, Levi, P. Roth, Apple, F. McCourt, Simon, Wiesel, W. Allen, Fellini. About 6 books and 2 films; I will post the list outside my office (3180 Angell Hall) in December. Class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. One short paper; one longer critical/analytical essay. Course requires your actively and intelligently participating presence as we try to learn together (which is the nature of a seminar) about the nature and importance of remembrance.

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Engl. 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 002 Literature and Film Kinds of Love

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This sophomore seminar will explore different kinds of love in diverse situations, drawing on selected texts mainly from the 19th and 20th centuries. The tentative list includes these books, each of which will be compared with a respective film version: Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet; Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Lawrence, Women in Love; Puig, Kiss of the Spiderwoman; Walker, The Color Purple; Nabokov, Lolita; and Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath. Mandatory screenings on video projection will be on Tuesdays (make-up on Thursdays) from 7 to 10 p.m. (most will be shorter than this). There will be several short writing exercises and a final exam. Students will have an opportunity to lead class discussion at least once during the term.

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Engl. 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 003 American Ethnic Women's Literature

Instructor(s): Janet Meier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines primarily twentieth-century immigrant and minority women's literature from a wide variety of perspectives: literary, social, and historical. Focussing on fiction, the course will also include some poetry, autobiography, and essays by multi-cultural women writers, who comment on their experiences as women, their sense of community and alienation, their relationship to both specific ethnic heritage and mainstream culture, and their awareness of where ethnicity intersects with gender and class. Course format will alternate between lectures about the history of specific ethnic groups in this country, and discussion of the readings assigned. Course grade will be based on class participation, several short papers, a midterm and a final paper, and an oral report featuring a specific ethnic woman poet (and sample poem) of the student's own choosing. Throughout the course, we will strive to explore the range of voices within any specific so-called "ethnic" identity such as Asian American, so that under that very general umbrella, we will read and compare texts by a Filipino American, a Japanese American, an Indian American, and a Chinese American women writer.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melanie Cooley

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We write to communicate because we have ideas, emotions, and experiences which we feel passionately about. We also write because we love language, because the careful writing of a poem or story can transform our ideas, emotions, and experiences into art. In this course we will explore that transformation, developing and honing the skills which will help us to become better writers. The term will be divided evenly between fiction and of poetry. In each section we will incorporate several exercises to facilitate the writing process from the generation of ideas to revision. By the end of the term each student will have completed a portfolio consisting of several poems and short stories.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Gabriel Tovanche (tovanche@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We write to mark our sorrow, anger, joy, or fear upon the world. For the world to care we must make our writing memorable; we must express ourselves well. Therefore, students in this introductory workshop in fiction and poetry will learn and develop the techniques, strategies and skills which, through writing, remake the world. The assigned readings are from diverse cultures and they will help us to appreciate what other writers have done and how they have done it. Our own writing will be the practical exploration of how to transform the warm hum of the mind into the deceptive stillness of words. Students will be required to write and revise six poems and two short stories. Students will also be required to keep a journal.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Eric Leigh Breedon (stipe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Prepare to be moved! This introductory course in creative writing will be both rewarding and strenuous as we will seek to become better writers and better witnesses. Each day that we are together we will consider how we can more wisely honor the gift, the miracle, the necessary ritual of language! We will be inspired not only by the works of prominent authors but also by the world around us. Never lazy, we will on occasion go in search of (and find) inspiration in the streets, the museum, the cafe, the salt mines. Though we will focus primarily on reading and writing poetry, we will also spend a significant amount of time examining and creating fictional pieces. Much of our time will be spent considering the elements of craft in a workshop setting wherein students will comment thoughtfully and thoroughly on each others' work with an eye toward revision. Each student will complete seven poems and two short stories. All works will be revised and polished for inclusion in a cumulative portfolio. Passion, a love of language, vocal participation, and attendance are all mandatory.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 005, 008.

Instructor(s): Louis Cicciarelli (lcicciar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section of introductory creative writing, the means of effective storytelling and poetic expression will be studied and developed in the students' own work. Since precise, evocative language is vital to both stories and poems, we will practice working with words in these forms. A greater portion of our focus will be on the short story, and we will begin with the basics characterization, setting, tension, point of view, etc.; we will use exercises, readings, and a survey of contemporary short fiction to build our understanding of the elements of the story. One of the most useful tools available to the beginning writer is the workshop; each student will have at least one piece of fiction and one poem workshopped in class. Students must complete a 25-30 page portfolio containing the revisions of two pieces of short fiction and 6-8 poems. There will also be a journal requirement that will include exercises, reactions to readings and other assignments, as well as a brief biographical presentation on a writer of your choice.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): John Ponyicsanyi (johnpony@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The poet Marianne Moore called poetry "imaginary gardens with real toads in them." In this introductory writer's workshop in poetry and fiction, we will talk about what these gardens and toads are in other words, how to blend dream with reality. We will do this by reading and discussing several authors to learn what we can about good imaginative writing. Class time will be devoted to discussions of the readings, occasional writing exercises, and critiques of classmates' work. Besides attending class and completing reading assignments on time, students will be expected to take their own creative work seriously, and revise it based on in-class discussions, other students' comments, and the required reading assignments. You will be asked to write and revise 5-10 poems and 25-30 pages of fiction, as well as participate in class, offer written and oral critiques of classmates' work, read one collection by an author or poet of your choosing, and attend two outside readings in Ann Arbor.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 007, 012.

Instructor(s): Christine Montross (stine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our aim in this introductory writing course will be to understand contemporary writing as accessible, relevant and important, and to develop our own voices with which we might contribute to such a chorus. The primary emphasis of the course will be on poetry, although we will experiment with fiction as well. Class will be held as a workshop in which your writing will be heard and discussed, and in which you will hear and discuss the work of others. The approach will be both supportive and constructive, both serious and, I hope, amusing. Although your original work will be the main focus of the class, we will look to important writing within past and present literature for inspiration. You may expect to produce 12 poems and 10-15 pages of fiction. In addition, weekly entries in a writer's journal, and brief reviews of a literary reading and a poetry book of your choice will be required.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Louis Cicciarelli (lcicciar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 223.005.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Kelly Allen (pulchela@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The main element of technique is verve, movement, energy, you have to hit and keep on hitting, sharp, hard, make it crackle, make it brilliant". says Hayden Carruth. This introductory course is designed for beginning writers of poetry and short fiction. The goal of this course is to help you listen for and discover new possibilities for developing your own writing voice. Although we will explore technique in both poetry and fiction, slightly more emphasis will be placed on poetry. Since this course is taught in a workshop setting, the focus will be on your writing. "Surprise" writing exercises will help break new creative ground and hone tools for shaping your words into art. We will explore lyric and narrative, and experiment with syntax, meter, and dialogue (techniques employed in both genres). To help you develop a more critical ear and eye, you will write constructive and encouraging critiques of each other's work as they are presented for workshop discussion. Requirements: attendance/participation, written/oral comments on peers' work, 30-40 pages revised final portfolio (i.e., 8-10 poems/15-30 pages short fiction), attendance of at least two public readings.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 010, 011 Publishing Poetry and Fiction

Instructor(s): Josie Kearns (jakearns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide visits by numerous writers who have published their work in a variety of national magazines as well as their own books of poetry and prose. Publishing the student's own work will form the basis of some criticism. How to submit your work, cover letters and researching markets will be covered as well as numerous approaches to detail, persona, memory, extension of ideas, layering, crosscutting stories, polyphonic (many-voiced) pieces and revision and polishing techniques. The performance of poetry and the short story will also be covered and students should attend at least three outside events (Guild House Series, the Slam, Visiting Writers Series at U-M, etc.). Also, the class will culminate in a reading of each students' work. A writing workshop will form the basis of class discussion as well as the visits of other authors. A portfolio will serve as the final project of this course as well as three short papers displaying critical writing. A connection will be made between historical writers and current trends in literature.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Christine Montross (stine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 223.007.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 013, 016.

Instructor(s): Therese Stanton (theresem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is structured to foster the beginning writer's imagination and artistic potential. Emphasis will be on developing an alertness to the observed world and a feel for the vividness and accuracy of language. Our work will center on fictional and autobiographical traditions. While we will primarily focus on student work, we will also read short stories and essays by Anton Chekov, James Baldwin, Michael Ondaatje, Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, and Lucy Grealy. Class time will consist of a close, critical reading of student work, writing exercises, and discussion. In addition to reading assignments, students are responsible for a final portfolio, weekly writing sketches, at least one student-teacher conference, and consistent attendance. There is no final exam. Required Text: The Story and its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction, Ann Charters, editor, and a course pack.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Peter Munoz (munozp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with a basic foundation in the craft of creative writing. The course will be taught in two units poetry during the first six weeks and fiction during the last seven. During each unit, we will study the work of published masters to gather insights into technique. Written exercises both in-class and take-home will complement classroom discussions of reading assignments. The emphasis, however, will be on workshopping poems and stories written by students. Each student will submit at least one poem and one story for peer review. Grades will be based largely on a midterm portfolio (containing five revised poems), a final portfolio (containing two revised stories totaling 15-25 pages), and participation.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 015.

Instructor(s): Belinda Kremer (belindak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Though for some the idea of "practicing" or "studying" creative writing is counter-intuitive, the truth is that writers become better writers through the study and practice of craft. Poet Mary Oliver: "...knowledge (power) will open the doors of process. It is craft, after all, that carries an individual's ideas to the far edge of familiar territory." We will engage in close readings and focused discussions of poetry and fiction by accomplished writers, as well as execute an extended series of directed writing exercises, understanding that a solid grasp of technique hones aptitude and fluency with the creative process. A good deal of class time will be spent reading and workshopping poems and short fiction written by members of the class. Throughout, we will note and sharpen the skills specific to productive criticism. There will be a slightly heavier emphasis on poetry than on fiction. Students will write, and diligently revise, six poems and two short stories.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Therese Stanton (theresem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 223.013.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Inci Sayman (zsayman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this introductory creative writing class we will explore the crafts of fiction and personal narrative (memoir). To do this we will ask and attempt to find answers to questions such as: How do we transfer personal experience onto the page? What makes our favorite stories our favorite stories? To these ends we will read published works, but our main goal will be to write and discuss our own fiction and nonfiction. Together we will discover previously not-thought-of ways to write about our lives and the lives of others. There will be a requirement of 35-40 pages of combined fiction and personal narrative. You are expected to complete assigned readings and to thoughtfully comment on the works of your classmates. You need only your experiences and imaginations. The rest we will wrestle with together.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s): Michael Haskell (mhaskell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

According to Louis Simpson, American poetry "must have/ A stomach that can digest/ Rubber, coal, uranium, moons, poems." That list is almost infinitely expandable with race riots, television shows, amusement parks, dawns, and poets. This course will be an experiment in how we learn to digest in language the facts of our lives. It will concern the writing of poetry and fiction, though the emphasis will be on poetry. Students will be expected to write and revise 8-10 pages of poetry, a 10-15 page short story, and 5 pages of short-shorts. Toward this end, we will workshop student pieces and examine the processes that lead from experience to writing and back again. Students will keep a writing notebook with in-class and out-of-class exercises designed to train the inner eye on places it might not normally focus. We will read closely the works of writers such as Heaney, Kafka, Neruda, O'Connor, James Wright, Plath, Rich, Kinnell, and spend some time on an in-depth examination of one writer's career. But our main focus will be on helping each student find a voice that can digest uranium and still "swim for miles through the desert/ Uttering cries that are almost human."

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 019.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 020.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 002, 012, 017.

Instructor(s): John Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course, using the workshop approach to the teaching of writing, is designed to help you improve your writing read rewriting by writing argumentative essays. (For a more detailed description of this course, see my Policy Statement.) When I use the word "argumentative," I don't employ it in the normal sense to refer to fighting or bickering; rather, I use it to refer to your taking a stance on a controversial or ambiguous issue and then defending, in readable English, your position by supporting it with specific details and/or logical reasons. Truth to tell, I should much prefer this course be English 225 Persuasive Writing. The stress is heavily upon "writing" rather than on "argumentative." The aim of the course is, finally, to teach you to think logically and then to express your thoughts in clear, readable prose. This should be a fun and an interesting class; indeed, I love teaching this course. I view my role as that of a devil's advocate a gadfly and my observations and comments a few of which might strike you as somewhat bizarre. I, for one, intend to have a good time. (If you think I jest, ask any of my former students.) You can also enjoy the class and learn something too. Utile dulci, as they say ("they" being, in this case, Horace in Ars Poetica).

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 003, 004 Restricted To CSP Students

Instructor(s): Jane Zukin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 005, 008.

Instructor(s): Martha Patterson (pattersn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will help you develop your skills at constructing persuasive arguments. As we read and analyze a series of essays about American twentieth-century culture, we'll practice strategies of gathering and presenting evidence, developing a personal writing style, writing for different audiences, considering counter arguments, and avoiding logical fallacies. Students will be expected to write four formal essays for the course: the first, a thesis-driven paper based on close textual analysis; the second, an analysis of a public event; and the third and fourth, research-based argument papers about a specific American social issue.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 006 Arguments of Our Times

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students of the course will choose areas of discussion from Robert Atwan's text, Our Times: Readings from Recent Periodicals (5th ed.). (Textbook available at Shaman Drum.) Within these areas, students will read, discuss, and evaluate essays that express differing, even opposing, viewpoints. Informed by these viewpoints and their own research, students will write, critiquing differing views and arriving at convincing conclusions. The course in not one for those who think that argument is simply stating an opinion. Those who want to consider differing views, critique them, and draw conclusions based on critical thinking might find this course to their liking.

Requirements: Class attendance & participation in discussion; four essays based on critical evaluation of differing views of an issue (1000-1500 words/essay); critical reviews (two pages each) of other students' essays (the number of reviews depending on the number of students in the course); daily reading response papers.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 007 Meeting the "Other" in America

Instructor(s): Anne Berggren (agbergrn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Meeting the "Other" in America: Here at UM we are putting lots of energy lately into understanding "others" people of genders, races, classes, ethnicities, and cultures other than our own. There are some people and groups, however, that I think we would just as soon forget about or that we make no effort to understand: the poor, for instance, the mentally ill, and the violent. In this writing class, we will try to see the world from other people's perspectives, people who see a different world than we do, people whose ideas or mindset we have difficulty explaining. The final essay will involve research on a current issue relating to a specific "othered" group interesting to you. Other writings will include two revised and polished essays, four short reflective papers, exploratory drafts, freewritings, in-class exercises, reading responses, critiques of other students' drafts, and analyses of the writing process.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Martha Patterson (pattersn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.005.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 010, 023.

Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer (soferand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will strengthen our writing muscles by practising a particular mode of communication: argumentative (or persuasive) writing. While some of the writing you will do in college and after will be strictly argumentative in other words, designed to win the reader over to your way of thinking about a particular issue you will no doubt be asked at various times to define, describe, analyze, compare, contrast, and evaluate. This course will allow you to practise and develop these skills within an argumentative framework.

The philosophy of this course is that the best way to improve your writing is through a collaborative process of drafting, workshopping, and revising. Only by testing our ideas against those of a particular reading community in this case, the class can we discover if our arguments hold water or tend to spring leaks! Thus a good deal of class time will be spent workshopping student work in process. You should expect to do a lot of writing in this course; we will also be reading and discussing a range of argumentative essays drawn from a course pack.

Our short assignments will include a letter to the editor and an "Op-Ed" piece. Longer assignments will include three papers (3-5 pages) and a revision of one of those papers. Each student will be expected to participate actively in class discussions, exercises, and workshops, as well as meeting regularly outside class in a small "writing cell" for peer response sessions. Please note that regular attendance and extensive class participation are required to pass this course.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Kelly Allen (pulchela@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An argument can be any text that expresses a point of view. Strong persuasive writing is as creative, engaging, and rigorously articulated as any other form of art whether written, spoken or visual. With these statements in mind, this course will focus upon further developing diverse rhetorical strategies employed in argumentative writing. We will read nonfiction essays by writers from widely ranged backgrounds ("creative" and "scholarly". contemporary and historical), as well as essays-in-progress by students in the class. Course requirements include active participation, in-class writing exercises, weekly reading responses, four formal essays, and peer critiques of essays presented in workshop.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): John Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.002.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 013, 015 Friendly Persuasion

Instructor(s): Daphne Swabey (swabey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey/english225web.htm

In this course we shall read a variety of texts and then find ways to differ politely, yet convincingly, with the writer, and with one another. The art of persuasion is an honorable tradition in scholarship and one that you will be developing throughout college. This course teaches the fundamentals of persuasive writing which include issues of audience, context and purpose. We shall learn about logical fallacies (or common mistakes in arguments) and we shall learn how to avoid such mistakes ourselves. There will be plenty of discussion as we talk about how ideas are developed, and how issues such as political bias, or gender affect our perceptions. There will be short weekly essays, four 3-5 page papers, and lots of revision because writing persuasively means refining ideas until they are just right. Our text will be Ways of Reading, ed. David Bartholomae.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 014 Seeing is Believing: Argument and Visual Culture

Instructor(s): Colleen O'Brien (mmajomo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class focuses on the skills necessary for effective argumentative writing. Critical reading is indispensable to writing an argument. By concentrating on model essays in the reader as well as various samples of "visual culture" ranging from television and magazines to sports and photography, we will build on critical reading and writing skills. As we gain expertise in cultural commentary, we will read essays by William Bennett, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and a broad range of other writers in a course pack. By assessing the meaning of various markers of difference such as gender, race, class, and sexuality in popular culture, we will generate essay topics. Three formal essays and several weekly assignments will be assigned.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 015 Friendly Persuasion

Instructor(s): Daphne Swabey (swabey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey/english225web.htm

See English 225.013.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): John Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.002.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 019 Legal Storytelling

Instructor(s): Jeff Buchanan (jmbuchan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is foremost a course in argument. As such, we will spend much time constructing, rhetorically and stylistically, written arguments, considering in the process issues like audience and evidence. We will focus our attention on legal storytelling and examine the effects narrative may have on formal argument. We will read some legal cases, such as Brown vs. Board of Education, and legal scholarship, including articles by Patricia Williams and Alan Dershowitz. You will be expected to write four 5-7 page papers, several one-page reading responses; you will also be asked to revise your writing often. Your participation is crucial to your success in this course.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 020, 021 Restricted To CSP Students

Instructor(s): Deanne Lundin (dlundin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 022, 024.

Instructor(s): Melissa Aaron (mdaaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will develop the twin branches of argumentative, or persuasive, writing: logic and rhetoric. Using a reader, we will study classic arguments, including the writing of Marvell, Swift, Thoreau, Martin Luther King, and others. We will work on constructing valid, logical arguments, assembling evidence, and using it effectively. Finally, we will hone persuasive skills. Students will be required to write three "formal" essays, at least one of which will be revised during the course of the term, to read and prepare assigned readings, to write peer responses to one essay of each of his or her fellow students, and to participate actively and fully in the class. The class will also make use of Internet-based instruction.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer (soferand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.010.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 024.

Instructor(s): Melissa Aaron (mdaaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.022.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 025 How to Persuade Your Mother to Get a Tattoo

Instructor(s): Anne Widmayer (afwidma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

First, think about your mother. Does she like hummingbirds or true-love knots? Would she like a full-body tattoo or an ankle tattoo? Next, consider how to present this proposition to her. Should you spring it on her at once? Or direct the conversation another way at first to quell her suspicions? And finally, consider how you should structure your arguments. What sort of evidence will you use? How will she respond to your arguments and evidence? In this section we will first learn the rules for classical argumentation. Always bearing in mind the audiences to whom writers address their arguments, we then will learn how to parse and evaluate the arguments of such writers and orators as: Abraham Lincoln, Sojourner Truth, Thomas Jefferson, Martin Luther King Jr., George Orwell, James Baldwin, Barbara Tuchman, Stephen Jay Gould, Alice Walker, Charles Darwin, and Linda Hasslestrom. Course requirements will include participating vigorously in class or small-group discussions, composing reading responses, writing five essays two of which will require outside sources, formulating critiques of your classmates' and your own writing, and presenting arguments in formal class debates.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 026 Using Technology for Argumentative Writing: Culture, Context, and Composition

Instructor(s): Jim Crowley (jcrowley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~compcomp/

What does computer technology have to do with writing? A person can certainly become a good writer without ever learning how to use a computer, but because of its novelty and increasing prevalence, technology can intensify and highlight common writerly concerns such as audience and structure. This course will teach and encourage you to use the technological resources for writing that are available to all students here at the University of Michigan. As a class, we will read, discuss, and evaluate a diverse array of argumentative writings from books, journals, and the Internet. The assigned readings will cover a variety of topics, but most will touch on the implications, both good and bad, of the increasingly strong presence of electronic media in our daily lives. You will evaluate the kinds of argumentative challenges that the different forums, both old and new, present to us as writers. In keeping with the multimedia nature of the course, you will formulate your own opinions and write short formal arguments for presentation and discussion within our electronic mail group. You will also write two to three printed essays and will have the opportunity, if you choose, to design and implement a site on the World Wide Web. As a class we will discuss the implications of having and making this kind of choice, and ideally much of your writing will engage with arguments and choices that your classmates are making.

Requirements: active participation in class and in our electronic mail group, five formal responses (300 words each) to assigned reading for dissemination and discussion within the electronic mail group, two short essays (five to six pages), and a longer project consisting of either eight to ten pages of writing or five well designed and linked HTML (World Wide Web) documents.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 027.

Instructor(s): Beth Haas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 028.

Instructor(s): Laura Williams (laurawil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~laurawil/

The purpose of this course is to help you develop your argumentative writing skills. In this class, we will focus upon the different components of argumentative writing, including: the use of evidence, the importance of research, the development and articulation of an argument, and the importance of rigorous analytical thinking.

Be prepared to spend a great deal of time reading, writing, and thinking. We will be reading primarily non-fiction essays (both contemporary and historical) on a variety of topics such as education, gender, and contemporary media. Our course texts may also include a novel, film, web sites, and television programming. The readings assigned will represent a variety of different perspectives on designated topics. We will discuss the ways in which these texts may or may not present models of good writing and argument, and you may also use these texts as springboards from which to develop the ideas you explore in your own writing.

Course requirements include active and earnest class participation and prompt, regular attendance. You will be asked to write a total of five paper. You may also be asked to participate in on-line discussion of course assignments or your writing.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Eric Leigh Breedon (stipe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If you don't have an opinion about the goings-on in the world here's your chance to get one! This class requires an interest in the nature of the argument, a desire to improve your analytical thinking and writing, and an interest in having your say and making it count. In this class we will discover the joys and hardships of constructing a solid, powerful, inspired and inspiring written argument. Each week will take a look at the world around us via the Sunday New York Times, gauging our reactions, formulating questions, and developing arguments that will become the basis of the essays we will write. Each student should expect to produce a total of 20-30 pages of polished prose over the course of the term. A good deal of class time will be spent workshopping student essays as we help one another become stronger writers and better critics.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 031.

Instructor(s): Margaret Price

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 032.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 227/Theatre 227. Introductory Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will write a one act play. We will start with the first whisperings of an idea, then nurture it, develop it, and workshop it. Class time will be divided in three ways: (1) Writing games to stir imagination, touch passion, inspire ideas, explore voice. (2) Lectures on story telling principles and dramatic structure common to plays, screenplays and teleplays. (3) Discussions of student writing. Other assignments will include reading plays, keeping a journal and meeting regularly with the teacher. Ambitious students are encouraged to write more than a one act play, e.g., a series of 10 minute plays or a first draft of a full length play.

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Engl. 229/LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001 Technical and Professional Writing

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng229.html

In this course, students analyze and practice the types of writing done by technical and professional writers. Like all effective writing, technical and professional writing emerges from an understanding of purpose and audience, from an understanding of "the rhetorical context." It is the specifics of its rhetorical context not any implied intellectual difference that distinguishes technical and professional writing from other forms of writing. Thus, a major goal of this course will be to help students develop the analytical skills they will need to navigate the rhetorical contexts technical and professional writers encounter in a variety of fields.

Since most technical and professional writing is the result of collaborative activity, students should expect to work in teams in the course, but the course will also address more personal issues, such as the writing of resumes and letters of self-promotion.

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 001 Heroes and Heroines: Reviewing the Protagonist from Romantic to Cyberpunk

Instructor(s): Allan Cook (arcook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~arcook/230_001.htm

When we read a novel or short story, we develop an association with the main character or protagonist. That hero or heroine confronts the dilemma of the fictional story and either succeeds or fails. But that success or failure is less important than the manner of that confrontation. That is what defines the hero as better than us, worse than us, or just like us. In this course, we will discuss the presentations of those confrontations in a variety of literature, from the Renaissance to the Postmodern, to ponder what those literary heroes suggest about their times and why they go out of fashion. In our investigations we will ask how the form of the novel or short story contributes to the evolution of the hero from, in Northrope Frye's terms, mythic to ironic. We will consider what makes a hero tragic or comic and ponder how heroines differ from heroes. Our readings will be stories from Aphra Behn; Cervantes, Don Quixote; Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from the Underground; Albert Camus, The First Man; H. Ridder Haggard, She; William Gibson, Neuromancer; Maxine Kingston; Ernest Hemingway; Alice Munro; Margaret Atwood; and others. Requirements will include active class participation, brief response papers, two essays and one final take-home exam.

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 002 Writers Without Homes

Instructor(s): Rona Kaufman (rdk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Because I grew up as a military dependent, I never had a home. Instead I constantly found myself in new places and new contexts, always wondering how I would ever fit "in." My own struggles to be counted as "there" with each move has made me interested in ways that others negotiate their "homelessness."

This course focuses on writers who struggle to stretch between multiple contexts, with an emphasis on those who must acquire a second language to even begin the journey. The readings move between fiction, autobiography, and poetry. Examples of possible selections include Rodriguez's The Hunger of Memory, Hoffman's Lost in Translation, and Kingston's The Woman Warrior, as well as short stories and poems by others. We will be asking what these writers lose and gain with each new home.

Our writing emphasis will be on revision. You will be asked to produce three essays with three complete revisions. In addition, you will have many other writing opportunities including journaling, shorter pieces, and in-class writing.

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 003 Diverse Voices

Instructor(s): Maureen Aitken (aitkenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will look at how voices from our multicultural communities are breaking conventional language rules, and changing our perceptions about literature. Many of the writers for this class question authority in unique ways. We will consider how writers subvert social norms through their unique stories especially stories that question concepts of race, class, and place. We will read short fiction from James Joyce, James Baldwin, Alice Munro, Ben Okri, and Gabriel García Márquez. Novels will include Beloved, The Remains of the Day, and Love in the Time of Cholera. Students will participate in class discussion, regular quizzes, and in-class writings. Students will also write one midterm (5-6 pp.) and one final (8-9 pp.) paper.

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 004 The Home and the World

Instructor(s): Bradley Kodesh (bkodesh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What shape is your bedroom? What color is your kitchen? What does your house say about you? How did the house you grew up in influence the development of your identity? In this course we will discuss these issues and the concept of home in relation to some novels written in Britain and its former colonies. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which where one lives is linked to questions of who is "civilized" and who is not, who is "English" and who is not, and also to the ways in which the house is connected with issues of race, gender, sexuality and class. Some other questions we might ask: Can one ever return "home" as Kazuo Ishiguro's and David Leavitt's characters attempt to do? Can you take "home" with you if forced to flee Nazi Germany for England via China to escape the Holocaust as those in Jonathan Wilson's "Boxes From Shanghai" must? Most importantly, we will consider whether "home" means the same thing for Emily Brontë in nineteenth-century England as it does for Tsitsi Dangarembga a century later in Zimbabwe. In asking these questions, we will learn to track some of the forces which have shaped our century as they are reflected in and influence the development of the short story and the novel.

Requirements: Writing (three papers, two short and one longer), participating (actively), and thinking (constantly).

Readings: Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions; Forster, Howard's End; Ishiguro, "A Family Supper". Leavitt, "Territory". Lessing, The Grass is Singing; Marechera, "House of Hunger". Mphahlele, "Mrs. Plum". and Wilson, "Boxes from Shanghai". among others.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class, we will want to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example a character in Ursula Hegi's Stones From the River thinks:

Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone.
Our readings will often focus on the dynamics of the imaginative process our own as well as the author's. As the term continues and we discuss various examples of 20th-century literature (mostly), we will find ourselves wondering what defines the dimensions of a character and the place that character makes in his or her world. We want to understand how an author has prepared these amazing creations to speak to us. There will be two essays (6-8pp); confer responses; and a comprehensive final exam.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Here's a laundry list of the Classics versus(?) Trash questions that we'll be tackling this term. How available should any Reader be to a given Text or Author? How does "degree of availability" relate to how we answer the question: "What is literature?" What roles do Conversion, Coercion, and Resistance play when we respond to a literary work? What determines the kind of authority over Beauty and Truth that we are willing to allow an Author and his Word to have in our personal lives and in that of our communities, institutions, and nations? With what kinds of devices does "literature" go about trying to do what it does? Does this course's major preoccupation (i.e. What is literature?) imply a gate-keeping function by someone somewhere? If so, what are the criteria, and who determines their status? To be considered then: what are we to do when any Reading-Conversion-Coercion experience confronts us with the Word of a God or an Allah (selections), with that of Chaucer ("The Miller's Tale") and Shakespeare (Othello). We'll also be looking at a Leslie Silko (Ceremony) and an E.M. Forster (A Passage to India); so, too, at the Ariel Dorfman of How to Read Donald Duck? Note: Dorfman is seriously interested in showing us what political ideology and artistic skill can "do to our minds," never mind that the contexts seem to involve only the "Lone Ranger, Barbar, the elephant, and other innocent heroes." Workload: short reports (one and half pages) on all the readings, and upon which class discussion depends; two 5 -page papers; a final comparative essay.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

People read all the time; that is, they attempt to make meaning of all that they see or hear or, well, read! When you see a person dressed in dirty clothes, with rips and patches at elbows and knees, you read her differently than you do a fellow with CLEAN clothes (also with rips and patches). When you drive through an unfamiliar neighborhood, you make note of the buildings and natural landscape, if any, and formulate some idea of the sociological and economic status of the inhabitants. When you hear someone speak, you make similar assumptions. When you read whether it be "literature" or the other stuff which is "not literature" you are also trying to come to some understanding of the text. This class will try to answer the question "What IS literature?" and will also try to help explain the ways in which we read literature and talk about it. We will watch a few films (The Postman and Pulp Fiction if they are available), read some short stories (as yet to be determined) and several novels (probably including Pride and Prejudice, A Hundred Years of Solitude, and others). These pieces will provide us with some visual and written representations of the world and opportunities for reading them in various ways. There will be two short papers and a final exam. Also an oral presentation as well as participation in a class computer conference.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will examine the ways in which different genres and periods have employed literature to understand and reflect upon historical catastrophes and crises. The genres considered will include drama, narrative poetry, novels, short stories, and the non-fictional memoir, and will range from the 17th century to recent fiction; each work will be paired with another from a different genre or period that shares with it certain themes, which will allow us to determine how our critical questions change when we move from one genre or historical period to another. Shakespeare's King Lear, for example, will be read alongside Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres; Milton's Paradise Lost will be contrasted with James Galvin's account of a harsher Eden lost in this century in the American West. Grades will be based on short weekly writing assignments and two longer essays.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Daphne Swabey (swabey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey/english239web.htm

This course examines a variety of texts which center on a violent crime. If literature "instructs and entertains" then what are we being instructed and entertained about? Are we being instructed not to imitate, not to enjoy violence? Are we supposed to be entertained by patricide, infanticide, and other forms of murder? Or should we perhaps look more carefully at these texts for what they tell us about our culture a culture that may be founded on violence inextricably bound up with it? Our texts will include the Greek tragedies Oedipus Rex and Medea; the Biblical stories of Cain & Abel, Jacob & Esau, Joseph and His Brothers; Beowulf; Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream and Julius Caesar. There will be short weekly papers, and two 3-5 page papers.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 006.

Instructor(s): John Tanke (jtanke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If literature is always historical, in that it arises from and speaks to a particular culture in time and space, how do we respond to works of literature that weren't written with us in mind? What does it mean to study an ancient text? To read it for pleasure? Can we appreciate an ancient work on its own terms, without judging it from a contemporary perspective? In this section of English 239 we will be reading works from the past (selections from The Iliad, Le Morte D'Arthur, and King Lear) beside contemporary novels that either recreate past worlds (Christa Wolf's Cassandra; Bradley's Mists of Avalon) or enable us to interpret present conditions in terms of the literary past (Smiley's A Thousand Acres). There will be a reader containing various essays in literary theory. Plan on two short papers and one longer term paper.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 007.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Honoring one classic definition of literature, this course aims both to instruct and to delight. We examine a variety of literary periods and genres, ranging from 19th-century novels to present-day films. On the way, we acquaint ourselves with the terminology needed for serious critical work in each of the genres we discuss exploring, for example, how written narrative, drama and film each require distinct analytical tools and vocabulary. Figures for study will include Virginia Woolf, David Henry Hwang, Charles Dickens, director Ridley Scott, Mary Shelley, and Patrick Süskind. Graded coursework consists primarily of short critical papers, with some in-class presentations and quizzes filling out the picture.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will examine stories and their telling, using fiction to explore some factors prompting the question "what is literature." From their inception, novels were imagined as imitating life. Throughout the history of fiction, from the efforts to capture "ordinary life" in George Eliot's fiction to the impressionistic style of Virginia Woolf, to post-modern novels of John Fowles and Tim O'Brien whose renderings of "reality" include writing about themselves writing. Novelists have kept shifting definitions of social and psychological reality in focus as they conjure their worlds. We, too, will keep those shifts in focus, asking how new ways of seeing influence the strategies writers use to create illusions of reality. We will also consider what parts readers play in pulling the rabbit out of the hat. Texts by writers mentioned above and others including Morrison, James, Kundera, and Hemingway. Requirements: two essays, final exam, responses to readings.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 009.

Instructor(s): John Young (jkyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class, we will examine the relationship between literature and memory. More specifically, we will investigate the ways in which authors create for characters, readers, and themselves by telling and remembering stories. In the texts we will read, memory refers not to a clear and stable past, but to a story that allows for multiple interpretations. In addition, we will cover the fundamental methods of literary interpretation. Our discussions will cover shifts in historical period (we will begin in the Renaissance, move to the nineteenth century, and spend considerable time in the modern and postmodern periods) as well as differences in genre. Finally, we will consider books as physical artifacts, so the historical context of publication will be of interest as well. Texas will include: a Shakespeare play; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Nella Larsen, Passing; Toni Morrison, Beloved; and others.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Andrea Kaitany (akaitany@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Literature" is an amorphous term; its definition changes with time, through cultures and among social groups. In this course we will explore the definitions of literature that are manifested across works from a wide range of time periods and cultures. Readings will range from Shakespeare's King Lear to Toni Morrison's Sula and Tsitsi Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions, as well as including other selections from the genres of drama, fiction, poetry and the non-fiction essay. We will focus broadly on the themes of family and origins and examine some of the ways in which these themes develop across the genres of the works and across the various social matrices within which the works were created. Grading will be based on class discussion, brief content-based quizzes and several essays.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Scott Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The study of literature today tends to focus on the multiplicity of "voices" within literary texts. Regardless of its genre or geographical/historical context, we can look for and discuss the ways in which a text's characters (both central and minor), narrator(s), speakers, etc., are represented or ignored by the author, as well as how they interact linguistically with one another. More often than not, contemporary literary critics use this focus on these textual representations and dynamics to raise important questions about the social and political ramifications of literature. In this course, students will ask these kinds of questions about a wide variety of literatures, then test out answers to these questions through extensive in-class discussion, and three short papers (3-4 pages) and one longer paper (7-10 pages).

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Rei Terada (terada@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course gives a sense of the relations between different kinds of approaches you might want to take in your readings of literary works. We will read and discuss prose works of various genres and periods, and will also discuss critics' interpretations of them. How are questions about gender and society related to questions about language and form? How should we talk about a work as both the product of a culture and the product of an individual author? How should you deal with the work's connections to the audience of its time, and its connection to you as a reader now? As a group, we'll debate these questions; each member of the class will also learn how to develop a topic of her/his own into a research interest. The main requirement of the course will be a research paper based on this interest, done in stages. Possible texts (not definite) include: Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Morrison, Song of Solomon; Robinson, Housekeeping.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Kirsten Herold (fogh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this section is to introduce you to a wide range of the critical concepts and issues you are likely to encounter in other English courses. To that end, we will read some very different works a couple of "classics" and some contemporary works along with various critical responses. The course will also have a practical research component, including a field trip to the library. Texts: Hamlet, Endgame, Cloud 9, Wuthering Heights, Beloved, and a course pack. Requirements: faithful and enthusiastic attendance, participation, three short writing exercises, an eight-page paper, an oral report, a midterm, and a final.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 239.002.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W. Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Poetry sings, tells stories, celebrates, and mourns. It is structured language that becomes fixed in our minds and shapes the way we see the world. Understanding poetry is often challenging and (almost) always rewarding. Poetry teaches slow and careful reading; it invites connections. Learning to read it well is demanding and forms the basis for life-long skills applicable wherever reading is done attentively. Our course will involve close attention to a broad range of poetry; there will be many short response papers to stimulate discussion, a midterm, and a final.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002 Honors

Instructor(s): George Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for any Honors student wishing to increase his or her enjoyment and understanding of poetry. Through a wide range of poems we will explore both the ways in which poems work and the ways in which we can understand and improve our responses to them. After an introduction to poetic analysis we will progress chronologically from Shakespeare to the present, emphasizing particularly the diversity of the last two centuries and ending with in-depth study of a major modern poet (probably W.B. Yeats). Class discussion and occasional informal lectures will focus primarily on close reading of individual texts, but students should also emerge from the course with some grasp of the historical development of poetry in English. Written work will include four short essays (the last of which replaces the final examination) and weekly response paragraphs. The text will be The Norton Anthology of Poetry, Third Edition.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to poetry: its traditional forms, themes, techniques and uses of language; its historical and geographical range; and its twentieth century diversity. The course will include discussion of oral and written traditions, and the place of performance in contemporary poetry; the kinds of power (from the magical to the political) which have often been associated with poetry; the relationships between secular and sacred traditions in poetry; and the varying roles of audiences and readers in the traditions of poetry. There will be discussion of the function of historical and national categories, as well as those of race and gender and class.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Eric Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin/240w99syl.htm

This prerequisite to the English concentration is open to anyone interested in developing a richer understanding and enjoyment of poetry. We will consider matters of poetic form (such as stanza structure, rhythm, and meter), diction (such as word choice, etymology, and sound), content (such as poems of love or war, the uses of allusion, and philosophic issues), and rhetoric (such as metaphor, irony, and symbolism). While studying X. J. Kennedy's An Introduction to Poetry, which contains mainly English-language works from the Renaissance to the present, we will work cooperatively toward developing widely applicable analytic, evaluative, and writing skills. Written work includes a daily reading journal, a 2-3 page paper on a single poem, a 3-4 page paper on at least two poems, and a 4-5 page paper on a single author or a single type of poem. There are no exams.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in certain fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at and hear poems, we shall consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene. Texts: an Introduction to Poetry book and an anthology, both in course pack form. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Martha Patterson (pattersn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce you to a wide range of primarily 19th- and 20th-century American lyric poetry. Throughout the course we'll focus on the significance of how poets craft experience. How and why do poets use various poetic devices word choice, images, speaker, tone, sound, rhythm, meter, form, etc. to create meaning? At the same time, we'll work to read poems in their various socio-historical contexts as we develop biographical, reader response, feminist, post-structuralist, and new historicist interpretations of the poems at hand. To this end, we'll concentrate on poems which emerge from or respond to specific historical events or movements: transcendentalism, slavery and abolition, the Civil War, westward expansion, industrialization, the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, the Beat movement, the civil rights movement, and post-modernism. How do these poems suggest the socio-political and/or aesthetic concerns of the period at hand? How do they challenge our assumptions? Revise clichés? Requirements include class participation, two essays, a presentation, and a final exam.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Belinda Kremer (belindak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Because You Asked about the Line between Prose and Poetry"

Sparrows were feeding in a freezing drizzle
That while you watched turned into pieces of snow
Riding a gradient invisible
From silver aslant to random, white and slow.

There came a moment that you couldn't tell.
And then they clearly flew instead of fell.

Howard Nemerov

The examination of poetry's flight the how of its motion, the source of its wings, the roles of craft, form, tradition and rupture in creating the air that allows individual poems flight will form the basis of our reading and discussion. We will read widely, across centuries of poems and poets, and closely, within poems and within two volumes by contemporary poets. Always, we will privilege language, one actual word at a time, as the source of both our subject and our inquiry. Coursework includes three papers, two in-class examinations, and an oral presentation.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Kelly Allen (pulchela@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As the poet Jorie Graham reminds us, poetry is that language for talking about things that cannot really be "talked" about. During this course, we will expose ourselves to the peculiar force that has "rippled, burned, danced, clenched, raged, argued, persuaded, and generally exploded through one remarkable language over a thousand years of its usage." This course, then, is designed for those who wish to become better readers and interpreters through the careful study and analysis of poems by historically recognized "canonical" writers, as well as contemporary writings by living poets. To the poet, language is a substance to be molded and shaped, in much the same way a graphic artist uses pigment or clay. With this view in mind, we will examine poems in order to appreciate how particular patterns of sound, rhythm, tone, and voice intertwine with subject to create what we respond to as art. We will read poets as diverse as Marlowe, Shakespeare, Vaughn, Donne, Blake, Keats, Dickinson and Whitman, Wilfred Owen and Edward Thomas, as well as contemporaries like John Berryman, Raphael Campo, Mark Doty, Galway Kinnell, Adrienne Rich, Gwendolyn Brooks, Louise Glück, Elizabeth Bishop, Philip Levine, and Alice Fulton. Requirements: attendance/participation, response journal, two papers, midterm, final exam, and attendance of at least two public readings.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Kelly Ritter (kritter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will study the styles, forms, and themes of poetry, surveying poetry first in terms of its formal structure, and second in terms of its cultural construction. We will concentrate on a wide range of American poetry, with attention to the changing face of poetry as both literature and art form. Authors will likely include Dickinson, Yeats, Eliot, Williams, Moore, Roethke, Frost, Bishop, Stevens, Plath, Sexton, Lowell, Hughes, Rich, Dove, Alexie, Merrill, Ashbery, Hogan, and other younger emerging American poets, as well as other poets who are or were representative of the diverse nature of poetry in the late 19th and/or early to late 20th centuries. We will also spend one section of the course discussing poetry by non-American authors writing in or translated into English, such as Rilke and Neruda, so that we may reflect on our own definition of American poetics from this perspective. Students should expect to read and write regularly in this course. There will be two papers (5-7 pages each) and two exams (midterm and final), as well as frequent reading quizzes on terminology and concepts, and possibly one in-class presentation. I expect active discussion and lively class participation from all.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): James White (jbwhite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to learn to read poetry by doing it together. We shall give close attention to a series of poems drawn from different periods. Our focus will be on what makes each poem work as a poem: its formal and metric structure, its imagery, the tension between its rhythms and those of ordinary speech, its tones of voice and imagined speakers, its ironies, ambiguities, allusions, and surprises. Our central questions will be what kind of meaning each poem has and how that meaning is made. During the course you will be exposed to many different forms of poetry and many different authors. This is a discussion class and accordingly your attendance and participation are strictly required. There will be three short papers, a midterm, a final and a series of short exercises. The text is the Norton Anthology of English Poetry.

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Engl. 245/RC Hums. 280/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Knopf (robknopf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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Engl. 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will concentrate on the movement and development of Shakespearean tragedy by studying "the grand style" of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. But in doing so we will also consider the origins of this tragic mode in the earlier tragedies and its later manifestations in Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. There will be a midterm, a final, and a series of short written assignments.

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Engl. 285. Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce students to the literature of the 20th century by studying novels by some of its greatest writers, specifically: Conrad, Mann, Kafka, Woolf, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Lawrence, Hurston, Camus, Saul Bellow and Toni Morrison. There will be frequent, short writing assignments at least one per book and a midterm and final exam.

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Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 308. History of the English Language.

Section 001 This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our language has changed dramatically in the twelve hundred years of its recorded history. We would not recognize speech (Old English) of the first Germanic peoples who migrated to post-Roman Britain in the fifth century; Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (Middle English) might seem to be written in a foreign language; even Shakespeare's (early Modern) English requires special efforts. Our main task will be to understand something of sounds, words, and structure of English at each of these earlier periods, but especially we will work to understand why and how a language changes (or doesn't). Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, group tasks, in class workshops, a midterm and final. The major prerequisite is that you come prepared to have fun. This course satisfies the requirement for a course in language for English concentrators in the Teaching Certification Program and meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 309. American English.

Section 001 Multilingual America. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Richard W. Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

All languages ever spoken in the Americas are immigrant languages, and all have contributed to the American English we speak today. In our course we will study a variety of languages, especially those in the heritage of the students who enroll. (If your background is Polish, Hispanic, Korean, African-American, or almost anything else, there will be a special project for you in this course.) The United States has always been a multilingual nation, but our government has seldom been supportive of languages other than English. We will focus particularly on how linguistic diversity has been "managed" by official and unofficial actions through our national history. We will also look at future trends in linguistic diversity and consider their impact on us and the world. Two short papers, one major research paper, a midterm, and a final are required. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 Science Fiction

Instructor(s): Eric Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin/313w99.html

This is an elective course for upperclasspersons. We will examine both the history and the diversity of science fiction prose by reading a representative international sampling of some of the best examples written since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Generally, we will approach each primary text in three ways: through a consideration of its backgrounds (scientific, mythic, and so forth), through specific questions the text raises (moral questions, questions of plausibility, and so forth), and through the traditional discipline of criticism (what is science fiction? what is the relationship of character to theme? and so forth). The written work for the course will revolve around weekly, short papers, and two longer papers. There are no exams. Authors studied include Mary Shelley, Poe, Hawthorne, Wells, Zamiatin, Capek, Stapledon, Bradbury, Clarke, Miller, Dick, LeGuin, Lem, and Gibson.

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Engl. 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 006 The "New Negro" Renaissance. This course meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Also known as the "Harlem Renaissance," the "New Negro" Renaissance benefited from the mass migration cityward and northward of black people from the southern U.S. and the West Indies during and after World War I. Promoted as a campaign to fight Jim Crow by providing political, economic, and cultural opportunities, the Renaissance movement brought unprecedented global attention to the literature, art, music, dance, and folklore of people of African descent living in the "New World." Relying on and resisting the patronage of white avant-garde modernists, the New Negroes, as they called themselves, created uplift organizations, social networks, and cultural media to experiment with new modes in literature, sociology, anthropology, and the performing arts. We'll explore works by such leading figures as W.E.B. Du Bois, Jessie Fauset, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Anne Spencer, Gwendolyn Bennett, Wallace Thurman, Duke Ellington, Bessie Smith, and Aaron Douglas. Two short papers and a final exam. This course meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

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Engl. 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 011 Literature of the Holocaust. This course fulfills the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider how writers have confronted the Holocaust in fiction and poetry. We will consider literature produced during and since the Holocaust, in ghettos, concentration camps, hiding places and the secure locations of life after the War, by survivors and those more remote in time and place. How is imaginative literature produced during or in response to such historical events? What happens to our understanding of Holocaust literature as we move further from those events? How does poetic language function? How does this literature affect our understanding of such familiar terms as exile, home, memory, public and private? We will read English translations of German, Yiddish, Hebrew, French, Polish, and Italian works. (There are no language requirements for this course.) Requirements include active participation in discussion and lecture, two shorter (3-5 page) papers, one longer essay (8-10 pp.), and periodic in-class written responses to the material we read. This course fulfills the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 Medieval Women Reading/Reading Medieval Women. This course meets the Pre-1600 and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Nancy Warren (nwarren@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As the split title suggests, this course has a dual perspective. We will read texts written by and for women in the Middle Ages to get a sense of the ways in which medieval women (from saints to sinners and queens to peasants) were involved in literate and literary cultures. In conjunction with these medieval texts, we will also analyze later texts ranging from Shakespearean drama to contemporary films. Our goal will be to explore both the changing representations of medieval women in literature and the cultural implications of these changes. Requirements include active participation, three 6-8 page papers, and a final examination. This course meets the Pre-1600 and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 002 Fictions of the Body. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Sally Robinson (sallyr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Bodies are both the most abstract and the most concrete of things abstract because so much philosophical, literary, medical and legal theorizing goes on about the body; and concrete for the obvious (but mysterious) fact that our bodies are the material manifestations of our identities. We'll read novels that exploring the gaps and disjunctions between real and ideal bodies, focusing our attention on how gender and racial identity is "written" on the body; on how new "technologies of the body" change how we think about, and experience, the body; on how the body is enlisted in consumer culture; on what it means for male and female authors to "write the body." At least some of the novels are likely to be controversial, concerned with such bodily matters as: eating disorders, pregnancy and birth, sexuality. Novels by Margaret Atwood, D.M. Thomas, Toni Morrison, Katherine Dunn, Gayl Jones, Audrey Thomas, some films. Several short papers; a longer paper; final exam. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 003 Colonialism, Nationalism, and Women's Writing in India. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Susie Tharu (stharu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The very earliest known collection of women's poetry anywhere in the world is the songs of Buddhist ascetics from the eastern regions of what is now India composed around the 6th Century BCE. Women are a rich and continuing presence in the literatures and cultures of India. Working principally with their writings, but drawing also on contemporary cinema, we will explore the question of gender in a postcolonial and nationalist context. These are some of the problems that will engage us: How do we write a literary history without simply projecting present-day categories and concerns onto the past? How did colonialism affect women's literary and artistic production in India? What are the figures and genres that emerged in that encounter? What happens when cultures "travel"? What role does gender play in the imagined community of the nation? What does it mean to say that a tradition is invented? We will divide our attention fairly evenly between literary and theoretical texts. Though the focus will be on India, the reading and discussions will reference other postcolonial literatures. Projects and term papers on Africa, the Caribbean or other literatures of South and South-East Asia will be welcome. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 004 Twentieth-Century Women Writers of Non-Western Origin. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Srilata Mukherjee (srim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The growing emphasis on global and feminist studies in American literary-critical discourse has contributed to an interest in literature by women of non-western origin. This course will explore a number of twentieth-century texts both by and about non-western women. Although our primary focus will be on literature by women of South Asian/Indian subcontinental origin, the course will encourage comparisons and contrasts with other Asian American and African-American women's narratives. We will begin by examining a few female protagonists represented by the male Indian writer, Tagore, the first Asian to win the Nobel Prize for literature (1913). Studying his representations will help us analyze the ways in which subsequent women writers with Asian backgrounds reconceptualized their heroines to articulate their specific gendered experiences. As many of these experiences involve literal or figurative dislocation, we will also examine to what extent if at all they intersect with experiences of displacement undergone by African-American women. Authors studied may include Mahasweta Devi, Imaginary Maps; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior; Toni Morrison, Sula; Suniti Namjoshi, From the Bedside Book of Nightmares; Sara Suleri, Meatless Days; Rabindranath Tagore, The Home and the World; and Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club. In addition to reading written texts, we will view some modern films about Asian women, "reading" these cinematic representations as significant cultural texts. Course requirements include one short paper, one long paper, and a final exam. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 Gothic Myth in Literature and Film

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Each age has its own myths, reflecting its aspiration and its fears. We will examine some Gothic myths, mainly from the 19th and 20th centuries, which are embodied in horror literature and films and represent changing cultural attitudes. Readings will include, but not be limited to these key texts: Dante's Inferno; Frankenstein; Dracula; Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Heart of Darkness. In addition to film versions of these books, we will view some of these other films: Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast; The Company of Wolves; An American Werewolf in London; King Kong; Freaks; Invasion of the Body Snatchers; Apocalypse Now. Six hours a week are scheduled to accommodate a few longer films, but most meetings will be shorter. The format of the class will combine mini-lectures with class discussion. There will be several short papers and a final examination.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 Literature of Exile and Displacement

Instructor(s): Aamir Mufti (mufti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore what it means to leave your home forever. We will be concerned with what it means to be homeless in the world and, alternatively, what it means to find a new home. We will explore the experience of exile through a reading of a number of important 20th-century literary works. Among the kinds of question we will ask are the following: Are their different kinds of exile? What does it mean to lose one language and acquire another? Can you choose to be an exile? Is the experience of political exile essentially the same as immigration? Above all, we will be concerned with exploring why the exile or displaced person has provided such an enduring image of the human condition itself in the modern world. There will be daily response papers and two 6-8 page papers.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 A Terrible Beauty is Born: An Introduction to Irish Literature

Instructor(s): Richard Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How is it that this island nation with a population, north and south, of less than five million, has produced some of the most beautiful and moving writing the world has ever seen? In this class we will get a sense of the history of Irish literature by reading a selection of the classic poetry, novels and short stories from the 19th century and before. Then we will take on the 20th century when most of Ireland's great masterpieces have been written. We will read a play by Brian Friel, short stories by James Joyce and a novel by Elizabeth Bowen, poetry by Seamus Heaney and other contemporaries. There will be two brief papers, frequent short quizzes, a midterm, and a final.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 004 Literature of the American Wilderness. This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators. Meets with Environmental Studies 407.001

Instructor(s): John Knott (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is wilderness, and how have American attitudes toward wilderness evolved? The course will explore these questions and others about how Americans (including Native Americans) have perceived the natural world and their relationship to it, as these arise from texts ranging from the earliest writing about America to twentieth-century responses to Alaska. Readings will include texts illustrating the place of wilderness in the American imagination, such as Thoreau's The Maine Woods, Muir's My First Summer in the Sierra, Cather's O Pioneers!, Leopold's Sand County Almanac, Faulkner's The Bear, and Momaday's House Made of Dawn. We will also read poetry (Snyder, Berry, Ammons, Oliver) and selections from twentieth-century nature writers (including Abbey, Dillard, Lopez). Students will be expected to keep a weekly journal, to write a paper of about ten pages, and to take a final examination. Anyone with an interest in the literature and the issues it raises is welcome. This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 005 African American Literature. This course fulfills the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course surveys the tradition of African American literature from the slave narratives through the Harlem Renaissance to the recent so-called "Second Renaissance" of African American women writers. How do the writers of this tradition use recurrent imagergy and theme to express their often ambiguous relationships to the dominant culture and the ravages of racism? We will analyze how these writers portray slavery, the incidents of post-Civil War lynchings, the Great Migration of blacks from the farm to the city, and generally, the role of black family members the elders, the mothers and fathers, the daughters and sons. We will speculate about the influence of African custom and belief on this American tradition, and examine how these writers were nurtured by their intersection with other forms of African American culture, engendered and supported in the women's clubs, through magazines such as Crisis, and in theatre groups such as the Howard University players. Class format will alternate between class discussion, and introductory lectures on African American history and the specific writers involved. Depending on what can be arranged, we may take a historical field trip to Detroit and/or Chicago. Class size permitting, students will be assigned short oral projects on particular subjects related to the course, such as the "Negro spiritual," the blues, the minstrel show. Although course readings will be mostly autobiographies and novels, we will also look at some non-fiction (for example, a speech by Martin Luther King, Jr.) and poetry. The latter will culminate in an assigned oral project where pairs of students "introduce" a poem by an African American writer of choice. Students will do some in-class writing, several 1-2 page reading responses, and two formal papers. We will share our writings with one another in class, and have opportunities to respond. This course fulfills the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 Theatre and Social Change. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell for specially posted hours for interviews for this course

Instructor(s): William Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course teaches students how to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth and of incarcerated youth and adults. In-class exercises, improvisations, and discussion of theater and pedagogical texts prepare us to assist workshop participants in imagining and shaping their own plays. Students will work an average of two to three hours a week in one of a number of state correctional facilities located in Adrian, Coldwater, Detroit, Jackson, Ionia, Ypsilanti, Saginaw, and Plymouth, or at Henry Ford High School in Detroit, or at one of four juvenile training schools or centers. An additional two hours is spent in class meetings, and a further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 Poetry

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, junior standing, and written permission of instructor. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to help aspiring poets to develop their own voices. it will introduce them to new ways of seeing and shaping into poetry the everyday wonders which influence our lives. It will also suggest new ways of using literary and local language as part of the poetic craft.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002, 003 Fiction

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, junior standing, and written permission of instructor. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 Poetry

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, junior standing, and written permission of instructor. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Although we shall read quite a number of modern and contemporary poems in order better to understand our actual and possible contexts as writers, most of our work will take place in workshop format: we shall write poems weekly, exchange them, read them aloud, and critique them both orally and in writing. For the workshop to succeed, everyone will need to turn in work on time and be able to offer constructive criticism criticism that is respectful but not fawning, honest but not cruel, personally meant but not egotistical. Evaluation will be based on the quality of the work produced weekly, on the quality of a final portfolio, and on workshop citizenship. The goal of the course is that all of us realize our best potential as poets, which should mean that we learn together to improve our craft.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005 Creative Writing and the Other Arts. Permission of instructor to be obtained before CRISP registration by conference hours (posted on door of 4200 Angell Hall). Requirements are explained in detail during the pre-election interview

Instructor(s): John Wright

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, junior standing, and written permission of instructor. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in mixed media composition, especially combinations of poetry, drama, and fiction with graphic arts, painting, music, dance, and photography. Prerequisite: experience with one or more of these art forms and interest in exploring their relations with other forms of art. Permission of instructor to be obtained before CRISP registration by conference hours (posted on door of 4200 Angell Hall). Requirements are explained in detail during the pre-election interview. They include maintaining a journal of varied writing and other forms of composition and completing a series of weekly composition projects, individual and collaborative.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 006 Fiction

Instructor(s): Brenda Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, junior standing, and written permission of instructor. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this workshop we will focus on writing fiction, studying short stories selected from an anthology titled You've Got to Read This, and critiquing one another's works with thoughtfulness and intelligence. Evaluation will be based on workshop participation, written critiques, and a final fiction portfolio of approximately fifty pages.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 The Mask

Instructor(s): Lilian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our writing class will be responding to some of the strategies enacted by our favorite, most effective, writers. I hope we will come to see "the mask" as less manipulative and negative a feature in our lives and our writing and more as a creative and artful agency of freedom. But whatever the outcome, we want to make the analysis of the concept of the mask an enlightening journey. Each student will be responding to that journey by writing exploratory essays; the nature of the subject of those essays will be determined by the student. We will begin the term and set the stage for our discussions of the mask by reading Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil," a parable in which a good parson comes out of his house one morning wearing a veil over his face. The townspeople respond by whispering to each other: "He has changed himself into something awful, only by hiding his face." The question of created persona and identity will be the center for our discussions. There will be reading fiction, non-fiction, peer essay five essays/revisions; peer critiques; a confer response/wk.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002 The Art of the Essay

Instructor(s): Leisel Litzenburger (liesell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be a course in the art of the essay. During the term, we will read and thoroughly consider the many subgenres of this form: memoir, nature writing, journal-making, autobiography, travel writing, the personal essay, and new journalism. At the core of our studies will be our own writing, revision, and reconception. Our class time will be devoted to developing a supportive community of critics and writers through meaningful reading, writing, and discussion. In addition to reading and extensively analyzing the various assigned works, we will be writing a number of both formal and informal essays. The basic elements of the essay voice, structure, language, theme, etc. will be studied and applied throughout the term. One of the most important goals of this course is to help you become an able and insightful reader and essayist, capable of thinking independently and writing both analytically and creatively.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003 Writing About Education

Instructor(s): Rosemary Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section will explore questions of "becoming," of how people evolve into who they are, and the role that education and language play in that process. To do so, we will be doing a lot of reading and writing on the topics of composition and education in its broadest sense. Using materials from classical and contemporary writers and thinkers, we will consider how people learn, how they become who they are. We will also be looking at some films and considering other media which also instruct and construct us. Texts may include Richard Rodriguez's Hunger of Memory, Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, and the film, Educating Rita. Writing assignments will include twenty-five pages of formal, polished prose which has been revised several times, 10 two-page critiques, and informal weekly writing.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide opportunities for students to learn to write with increased insight, power, and assurance. Given that goal, I've tried to create a course (1) that gives students much writing practice (though not always as formal papers), (2) that allows students to work independently on topics of their own choosing, (3) that offers examples and inspiration from some of the finest prose stylists, and (4) that keeps the whole class sharing ideas and helping each other with writing throughout the term. Readings, discussion, in-class writings, and workshopping of one another's papers will be the primary focus in the classroom. Attendance and participation are essential, given the collaborative nature of the work.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 005 Ripening Memories: The Making of Meaning

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"I am moved by fancies that are curled/around these images, and cling," says T.S. Eliot. In some significant ways a literary text may serve its reader similarly to a past life remembered, a memory, a dream. In this seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how that process works. How does an author carve a living, changing world out of print and paper? How do we carve our lives out of past lives our own and others? What do we choose to remember and what "to forget"? We will, as the seminar progresses, find ourselves asking: "what actually did we hear and see in the past," both in our personal lives as well as in the lives of the characters we meet in the texts and films we read and view, respectively. It will be a fascinating story for us to unfold and we will find some fascinating authors to help us unfold it. There will be reading fiction, non-fiction, peer essay five essays/revisions; peer critiques; a confer response/wk.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 006 Composing on the World Wide Web: Reading, Writing, and Thinking Hypertextually

Instructor(s): Barbara Monroe (bjmonroe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the intersections of oral, print, and electronic discourse. Obviously, electronic discourse is not orality nor is it print literacy; perhaps less obviously, it often incorporates both to become a new/hybrid/multimedia form of literacy altogether. Writing to the World Wide Web, therefore, is more appropriately termed "composing." The electronic environment, with its own evolving conventions, both constrains and liberates us to rethink what will count for successful communication in the future. Hypertext is not a computer skill; rather, it is a non-sequential mode of reading, writing, and thinking that deploys medium-specific strategies (i.e. organizing metaphor, naming conventions of nodes and links, and navigational approach) to achieve textual coherence and rhetorical effectiveness. Because the reader of hypertext interacts more highly with the document than does the reader of a traditional essay, authorial control in cyberspace must also be reconstrued. In addition to reaction papers to our readings in literacy theory, we will write two "traditional" essays and two "hypertext" essays, analyzing emergent Web rhetorical conventions, comparing them to past literacies historically, and arguing for or against a legitimate place for the Web and the hypertext essay in academic life. Prior knowledge of hypertext programming (HTML) will be helpful but not necessary for enrolling in the course. Readings will include both an electronic course pack as well as printed materials.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 007 Writing on the Margins of the Mind

Instructor(s): Scott Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will present students with a number of challenging questions regarding the relationship between written and everyday communication and human cognition. What, for example, do such elements of daily conversation as gossip, jokes, stories, modern folklore (those strange but "true" stories we hear and pass on), small talk, have to do with the narrative structure of novels, short stories, drama, film, etc.? Further, how do virtually all forms of human narrative reflect our need to resolve the mysteries of everything from daily life, to the nature of the cosmos? Finally, and most important, how are such mystery-solving narratives part of both our individual sense of consciousness, and our sense of community? Students should be prepared to do quite a bit of verbal sharing in class and be ready to postulate answers to these and other tough questions, both during in-class discussion, and in your essays. You will be working toward final, polished form in these essays, and you will do so by seeing your work through a number of drafts and revisions over the course of the term.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 008 Forbidden Knowledge

Instructor(s): Scott Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Are there questions human beings shouldn't ponder? Is there such a thing as "going too far" in our quest for knowledge? Do some questions open a Pandora's Box of immorality, morbidity, perversion, or worse? Are there questions that we as a species just can't answer? If these questions intrigue you, bother you, and/or spark your insatiable (maybe even "twisted". imagination, then this course is for you. Over the course of the term, students will read published essays that ponder just these kinds of imponderable ponderings, then generate their own daring essays essays that push the envelope of human cognition, accepted knowledge, and even common sense. Students will generate approximately 25-30 pages of polished prose during the term.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Randall Tessier (rlt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since this class was designed to augment your palette of writing skills, I have tried to provide a text, A World of Ideas that offers a plethora of thematic possibilities. Its eight sections Government, Justice, Wealth, Mind, Nature, Culture, Faith, and Poetics represent a wide range of thought. Looking at a tradition of critical thinking that stretches from the Chou dynasty (sixth-century BC) to the late twentieth century, we will carefully examine the structure of various truth claims and studiously consider their method of persuasion. This doesn't mean you won't have a chance to experiment with your writing, nor does it imply a prohibition against creative and autobiographical writing; but I do ask that some aspects of the readings figure into your writerly considerations. Aside from this, the more practical purpose of this class is to further develop your writing skills in a way that ensures your continuing academic success!

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Engl. 327/Theatre 327. Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Engl. 227. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.001.

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Engl. 351. Literature in English after 1660.

Section 001 Pictures of Modern Identity. This meets the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Tobin Siebers (tobins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tobin/html/E351.html

Who invented you? What does it mean to be you, or any one person, apart from others of your kind? The works we will be studying are the building blocks of our concepts of identity. They provide a diverse picture of who we are and what we do: the self as castaway or genius, as solitary thinker or alienated victim, as moral superior or criminal. We will read works both of great artistic innovation and of the popular imagination, our one requirement being that they have had a lasting impact on the way we imagine ourselves. Works include Robinson Crusoe, Gulliver's Travels, The Lyrical Ballads, Mansfield Park, Walden, Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde, The Wasteland, A Room Of One's Own, The Invisible Man, In Cold Blood. Two lectures and one discussion weekly. Requirements are three papers, midterm, and final. This meets the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

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Engl. 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001 This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of Shakespeare's dramatic works, selected to represent his exploration of major genres over the course of his career. Although we will be reading the plays intensively as literary works, we will also be considering social and political issues in Elizabethan and Jacobean England in order to clarify the complex engagement of Shakespeare's stage with cultural controversies of his period. Our goal will be to appreciate Shakespeare and to examine the impact of his drama in its own day and its ramification for ours. The plays likely to be studied: A Midsummer Night's Dream; The Merchant of Venice; Measure for Measure; Hamlet; Othello; King Lear; The Tempest. The text used will be The Riverside Shakespeare. There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as three relatively short essays. This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 Medieval Texts in their Environments. This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Nancy Warren (nwarren@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Texts inform and are informed by the world in which they are produced and circulated. The two-hundred year period covered by this course was one of dramatic cultural and artistic change. Of primary concern for us will be the social work done on and by texts in this dynamic era. In our analysis we will return frequently to issues such as the redefinition of kingship and rule, peasant unrest, religious schism, and women's changing roles. Readings will include mystery plays, lyrics, texts by women mystics, romances, and tales (including selections from The Canterbury Tales). Requirements include active participation, three 6-8 page papers, and a final examination. This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 Renaissance Inwardness. (Honors). This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Michael Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Renaissance is frequently announced as the period in which modern notions of the self emerged. In this course we will examine this generalization by reading a range of works by writers of the English Renaissance that focus in some way on the project of discovering or comprehending an interior self. We will read love poetry, religious poetry, poetry of friendship, epic, drama, as well as works of medicine and philosophy, in order to explore the various resources for delineating inwardness available. Authors to be studied include Thomas Wyatt, Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, Philip Sidney, Mary Wroth, John Donne, George Herbert, Aemilia Lanyer, John Milton, and Margaret Cavendish. This is an Honors seminar; requirements will include attendance, participation, several class presentations, one 5-7 page paper, and one longer research paper. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 004 Magic, Religion, and the Supernatural in Medieval and Renaissance Literature. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Melissa Aaron (mdaaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Medieval and Renaissance literature draws on a cultural context which assumes various supernatural "givens." We will read some of the most interesting works of this period within this cultural context. We will explore a variety of genres and literary styles, and will also be reading from an anthropological and historical perspective. Texts read will include selections from The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Dr. Faustus, The Tempest, and Paradise Lost. Requirements include active class participation, three papers of six to eight pages, and various short assignments. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001 British Poetry: Dryden to Byron. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Miriam Burstein (meburste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How are literary traditions formed and reformed (or even deformed)? This course traces the poetic conversations and character assassinations that shaped British poetry between the late seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries. We'll examine how poets situate themselves in or against "the poetic tradition," paying careful attention to revisions, quotations, allusions, and demolitions. Our extensive readings will concentrate on major poets such as Dryden, Pope, Wordsworth, and Byron, but we will also explore the work of lesser-known figures. Requirements: short paper; research paper with preparatory exercises; take-home final exam. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002 Honors: Revolutionary Writing in Britain and the Americas. This course meets the American Literature and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores writing about revolution and social reform from the 1770s to the 1850s, focusing on key moments of political upheaval: the American fight for independence, the British response to the French Revolution, and the rebellion against peonage in England and slavery in the Americas. This was a period when revolutionary ideas and movements challenged a variety of ancient social and political forms; it was also a time of radically new literary experimentation when writers attempted to burst old forms of social behavior by forging new forms of literature. We'll examine the intellectual and literary trends of this time in relation to innovative concepts of social, political, and economic organization in works by Thomas Paine, Philip Freneau, Thomas Jefferson, Phillis Wheatley, William Blake, Helen Maria Williams, William Wordsworth, Edmund Burke, Hannah More, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Hays, Mary Prince, Olaudah Equiano, Martin Delany, and others. One 15-page research paper and one five-page abstract with bibliography. This course meets the American Literature and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

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Engl. 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 003 Squeaking Boy/Roaring Girl. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): P.A. Skantze

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Like most public theatrical practices, cross-dressing as an act of display and disguise changed in the period 1600-1830 from the public, ribald, outlaw practice adopted by actors and libertines to a more private literary act. The class will consider the period by tracing the intricate idiosyncrasies of "acting the self" as it was represented by cross-dressed players and "multiply dressed" characters in plays that will include: Antony and Cleopatra, Epicoene, The Roaring Girl, The Younger Brother, A Bold Stroke for a Wife, The Way of the World, The Beggar's Opera, The Rivals. Texts in which we will consider the theatrical creation of the "I" taking place in English letters often "I's in Drag" include: selections from "The Tatler" and "The Spectator," Moll Flanders, The Female Quixote, selections from Tristram Shandy and Clarissa, Blake's poetry, The Mysteries of Udolpho, The Cenci, Mansfield Park. Throughout the course we will consider cultural clues about the creation of the self in the shifts in theatrical acting styles, portraiture, legislation governing the dress and behavior of men and women. Requirements include short papers, longer essays, sprightly class participation, and a midterm. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 004 This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Emily Cloyd (ecloyd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A wide view of English life and literature of the period 1660-1800: an Age of Reason when many major authors were mad, an Age of Enlightenment when the upper classes feared servants learning to read, a period when England was turning from agriculture to industry and which was also heavily involved in colonization and exploration. Politically, philosophically, we still live much of the time in 18th-century England, for ours is the first government to try to apply formally the developing European concepts of equality, freedom, and human rights. In any time the arts are intimately connected: here the relationships are so close that each illumines the other and eases understanding of what otherwise seems obscure. Music and both still and moving images will be provided with the aid of a computer program of my invention. Frequent short writing, two longer essays, and a final exam. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 What Was Modernism?

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore Modernism the style/movement that dominated the "high" art of the first decades of this century. While we will read a few poems (Eliot, Yeats) and glance briefly at some of the art and music, the focus of the course will fall primarily on fiction. Works to be read include Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Mann's Death in Venice, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist, Kafka's The Metamorphosis, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. Course grades will depend on two essay exams, and frequent short, informal writing assignments. Regular attendance is essential.

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Engl. 383. Topics in Jewish Literature.

Section 001 Constructing American Jewish Literature. This course meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): George Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This new course will use a comparative approach to constructing a tradition of Jewish literature in our country during the last century. We will study the literature both in itself and as a paradigm for contemporary debates about cultural hybridity, assimilation, and ethnicity. Our reading will mix familiar and unfamiliar names (and why so many Jewish writers remain outside the canon will be one question we shall ask). We begin with neglected authors of late 19th century such as Emma Lazarus, use Israel Zangwill (author of the play The Melting Pot, which made that phrase popular) as our transition point, and turn to successive generations of Jewish-American authors, such as Abraham Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, Henry Roth, Arthur Miller, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, Allen Ginsberg, and Wendy Wasserstein. Contemporary readings on Anti-Semitism, economic and educational history, and cultural theory will help us explore the problematic nature of group identity within a complex society. Written work will include weekly response paragraphs, a midterm, a term paper (8 to 10 pages), and a final examination. This course meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

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Engl. 386. Irish Literature.

Section 001 Inventing Ireland: 100 Years of Irish Cultural Production, 1898-1998

Instructor(s): Eileen Morgan (emmorgan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

It is often said that Ireland has produced some of the finest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century. In this course we will study an array of literary and cinematic texts in an attempt to understand better the relationship between the nation's history of conflict and its rich imaginative life. Our particular focus will be the images and mythologies of the island and its inhabitants, through which Irish writers and filmmakers have attempted to define Irish national identity and aspirations, and spur social and political change. Our survey will include works by figures who have achieved "canonical" status, or at least international reputations Yeats, Joyce, Edna O'Brien, Seamus Heaney, Roddy Doyle, and filmmaker Neil Jordan, for example. We will also read texts by lesser-known but important writers such as Anne Devlin and Marie Jones. Students will be asked to write three essays of medium length (4-6 pages) and one longer essay on a research topic of their choice, and also to complete frequent pop quizzes, a midterm, and final.

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Engl. 401/Rel. 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~vika/englbible.html

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse. Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm, and a final. Class attendance and participation essential. This course no longer meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 408/Ling. 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 Reading Early Varieties of English. This course meets the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators. Meets together with English 502.001

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. This course meets the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators. (Although this course follows up on material covered in English 407 (reading Old English), 407 is not a prerequisite.)

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Engl. 411. Art of the Film.

Section 001 Prison and the Artist

Instructor(s): William Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The United States is the most incarcerating nation in the world. Twelve percent of the U.S. population, African-Americans are 50.8% of our prison population. In 1979, 1 in 14 Michigan state workers were employed in the state prison system; it is now 1 in 4. Michigan has built 30 prisons in the past 15 years. Several states have brought back prison stripes, chain gangs, and rock breaking. Yet to most of us prisons remain invisible places we ignore or know only through rumors, myths, and the speeches of politicians. This course will address prison reality and culture and the ways in which prisons are represented to us and to others. Discussions will focus on the works and their implications about personal attitudes and behavior and about social institutions. Journals and final project, no exams.

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Engl. 412/Film-Video 412. Major Directors.

Section 001 Film and Authorship

Instructor(s): Virginia Wexman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for a total of nine credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What do we mean when we say that someone like Alfred Hitchcock is the author of his films? This course will begin to explore this question through the examination of some theoretical writing on authorship. We will then consider a number of case studies, screening groups of films by directors such as D. W. Griffith, Frank Capra, John Ford, John Huston, Billy Wilder, Satyajit Ray, Gordon Parks, Luis Buñuel, Stan Brakhage, Federico Fellini, and Jane Campion. In addition to taking a midterm and final examination, students will be expected to write two short papers of 4-5 pages each and to give brief in-class reports on filmmakers of their own choosing. The textbooks will be Theories of Authorship, edited by John Caughie, and an anthology of photocopied readings.

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Engl. 413/Film-Video 413. Film Genres and Types.

Section 001 An Alien Eye: The U.S. As Seen by European Directors

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for a total of nine credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What do films made in an/or about America by filmmakers whose perspective is essentially European tell us about ourselves and those looking at us from the outside? Emphasis will be on what these films say, how they say it, the nature of their vision. One film per week; three lecture hours; mandatory small discussion groups. Course may be repeated if content differs from previous election. No prerequisites, but the course is not "An Introduction to the Movies." Previous film study couldn't hurt, but Giannetti's Understanding Movies, the text, provides a solid foundation for beginners. Alternate text for seasoned veterans. Purchase of a pass admits you to all screenings, almost all at the Michigan Theater. Film titles will be posted outside my office in December. Rigorous writing with high standards for analytical/critical prose. Two 2-page papers; two 5-page papers; final exam; no "Incompletes." Those who insist that "media" is a singular form flunk.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 The Business of Memory

Instructor(s): Charles Baxter (cbaxter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

It's possible that now, in the information age, we are pioneering a new form of literature in response to market pressures and the explosion of data the literature of forgetting, of strategic amnesia, erasure. The combination of data-nausea and the commodification of what would once have been considered private and personal has led to some curious responses to the past and to memory itself. These are both literary and political matters, as President Clinton has recently discovered. I want to look at some recent texts, most of them slightly off the beaten path, that reconstruct a history through memory and the work of the imagination, and then look at some opposing texts that suggest such an effort is impossible or passe. Requirements for the course will be several short papers, one long paper, and a creative response. The book list will be drawn from some of the following texts of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry: James McConkey, The Anatomy of Memory; William Maxwell, So Long, See You Tomorrow; David Shenk, Data Smog; Jamaica Kincaid, At the Bottom of the River; Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping; Lynda Hull, The Only World; Lydia Davis, Almost No Memory; Benjamin Wilkomirski, Fragments; Bernhard Schlink, The Reader; Tim O'Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Michael Ondaatje, Running in the Family; Lyn Hejinian, My Life.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Swift and the Art of Satire. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Emily Cloyd (ecloyd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Although this course will be based chiefly on the great English satirist, Jonathan Swift, and his works, we will also review the history of satire and what we can learn of its present state. As most of the reading will be from the eighteenth-century and before, this course can be used to meet the pre-1830 concentration requirement. We will examine varieties of satire, the satiric impulse, the effects of satire, possible reasons why satire flourishes at some times and appears almost to die out in others. Our texts, Gulliver's Travels and an anthology of Swift's works, will be augmented with handouts representing other authors and periods. We will have a computer conference and in addition to occasional short writings, there will be at least two longer essays (ca. 5 pp.), perhaps three, and a co-operative term project on satire in our own time. A midterm and a final exam. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 003 The Practice of Criticism

Instructor(s): William Ingram (ingram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section we'll broaden our sense of what the practice of criticism entails, argue about its utility, and work at communicating its rationales and its results to others. Our focus will be critical practice and its articulation rather than the mastery of a reading list. We'll read some critical essays, some short stories and a couple of novels (writers like Grace Paley, Milan Kundera, Joan Didion, Tim O'Brien, Margaret Atwood, etc.); not a heavy reading load, but a varied and challenging one. Group discourse will be our core activity; we'll talk a lot in class, both informally (sustained conversation) and formally (frequent oral reports); don't enroll if you're not prepared to talk regularly and intelligently. There will be a long final essay.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 004 The Legendary Prehistory of Northern Europe. This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): John Tanke (jtanke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore a variety of primary sources chiefly poems, myths, and sagas that deal with the cultural origins of Northwestern Europe. How did the first English, Celtic, and Scandinavian writers envision and record their prehistory? What myths and legends were deemed important to know and pass on to posterity? A tentative list of texts includes: "Beowulf," selections from the Irish Tain Bo Cualnge and the Welsh Mabinogion, The Prose Edda of Snorri Sturluson, The Saga of the Volsungs, and Egil's Saga. Besides offering a tour of some of the best early medieval literature, this seminar should be of interest to anyone concerned with the concepts of history, myth, and legend. There will be three short (5-7 page) papers and no final exam. This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 006 Family Matters. This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Ejner Jensen (ejjensen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section of English 417 asks students to read a series of fictions that present versions of and attitudes toward the family. Concurrently, it requires that students write about their own families en route to discovering significant themes that will allow them to design and complete a final major paper drawn from fictional representations of the family. All students in the course will read a selection of core materials including such works as Family Dancing by David Leavitt, Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler, I Am One of You Forever by Fred Chappell, Paddy Clarke, Ha, Ha, Ha by Roddy Doyle, Testing the Current by James McPherson, Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin, and two or three others. Weekly writing in a variety of forms and a long final paper will be key requirements of the course. In addition, students will be expected to attend class regularly, contribute individual oral reports, and take part in a group project. This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 007 Nature in American Literature and Culture. This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators. Meets with American Culture 498.001

Instructor(s): James McIntosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 498.001.

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Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with fifty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the course should get on the waitlist at CRISP and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

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Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Josh Henkin (josherb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be a fiction-writing workshop. Although I will assign some outside reading, the bulk of the work will be the stories you bring to class, and by the end of the term you will have written fifty pages of fiction. Active class participation is also required. If you would like to enroll in the course, please get on the waitlist at CRISP and bring in a manuscript the first night of class. I will post the list of admitted students shortly thereafter.

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Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001 Writing and Thinking Beyond the Academy

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How often have you been warned that the skills and talents that make for a good student don't necessarily equip you for the so-called "real world?" This class presumes otherwise: first, that the academy is the real world or at least part of it and, second, that sound principles of writing and thinking apply everywhere. To hone those skills, we will read wonderfully written, brilliantly conceived texts both fiction and non-fiction that raise ethical and interpretive issues in "real world" areas of concern such as law, medicine, teaching, journalism, feature writing and parenting. We will use those texts as the basis for our analysis and the inspiration for your writing. You will write two 5-7 page essays, and one 10-15 page essay that addresses issues in an area of particular interest to you. Other requirements include weekly writing about the texts, responses to your classmates' essays, regular attendance and class participation.

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Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 428. Senior Writing Tutorial.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Baxter (cbaxter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, 323, and 423/429. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a thesis tutorial for undergraduate students who are in their last year of the Creative Writing Subconcentration and have taken the 200-, 300- and 400-level writing workshops. Working closely with the writing faculty, students will complete a major manuscript. The course will culminate in a reading series in which students present their best work to the public. The first class meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 12 in G239 Angell Hall; thereafter, biweekly tutorials will be scheduled according to the convenience of the instructor and students.

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Engl. 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a poetry-writing workshop. Students will circulate and discuss their poems written during the term, as well as analyze a selection of poetry and criticism by eminent contemporary poets. We shall use an anthology of recent poetry as our central text. Students should be prepared to devote considerable time to composition and revision, and to extensive commentary on their fellow students' writing. Each student will keep a journal of readings, ruminations, and materials for poems. Some experience in creative writing courses is desirable, though not essential. Permission of the instructor is required. Leave a sample manuscript of 3-5 pages in Professor Goodison's mailbox, 3250 Angell Hall, during the week before the first day of class, or bring a manuscript to the first class. A class list will be posted on the professor's office door after the first day of class.

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Engl. 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): David Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The success of the novel as a popular literary genre tends to obscure the fact that it is a fairly recent innovation. In this course we will survey the first century of the novel's development in England, reading important works by such writers as Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Lewis, and Austen, and paying special attention to the following questions: What distinguishes the novel from other literary forms, and why did this genre arise when it did? What were the chief concerns aesthetic, social, psychological of novelists writing in the eighteenth century, and how did these evolve over the course of the period? Finally, what role did authors claim for their novels in eighteenth-century English society, and what role did they actually play? Requirements include an oral presentation, two papers, and a final. No prior background in the period is required. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Engl. 432. The American Novel.

Section 001 This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From the start, the American novel has struggled with the social, political, and cultural problems of this country while seeking form and technique to express this nation's independence and uniqueness. This class examines American fiction's valiant attempt to reconcile our nation's reality with its ideals through the literary possibilities of the novel, while also examining the individual achievements of a series of significant American writers. The class will examine Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Herman Melville's Moby Dick, Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Kate Chopin's The Awakening, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, William Faulkner's Light in August, and Toni Morrison's Beloved. Students will write three short papers as well as a midterm and final examination. This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine developments in English fiction from the turn of the century to 1941. We will explore the ways in which the twentieth-century novel, rather than being driven by plot, attempts to trace, in Joyce's words, "the curve of an emotion" or to incorporate, as Lawrence desires, philosophy and fiction in the novel. Virginia Woolf tells us that "human nature changed" in the first decade of the 1900s. Certainly the way novelists constructed human nature changed dramatically. We will also discuss issues that might be broadly grouped under the heading "gender". how do men and women in our century respond to or initiate the radical redefinitions of sex roles that occur during our century? Or are those "radical redefinitions" more rhetorical than substantive? How do anxieties and confusions manifest themselves in the texts we're discussing? We will also pay close attention to the variety of ways each author positions her / himself in relation to a past: how does the "modern" stand in relation to "history"? Readings will include a substantial course pack; Bennett, The Old Wive's Tale; Stein, Three Lives; Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Lawrence, Women in Love; Woolf, To the Lighthouse and Between the Acts. Course requirements are three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's seven to nine pages long). There will be a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 444/Theatre 322. History of Theatre II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leigh Woods, Robert Knopf

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 446. World Drama: Congreve to Ibsen.

Section 001 Staging the World? This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): P.A. Skantze

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the literary dramatic canon of the late 17th, 18th, and 19th century and the history of theatrical performance between Renaissance and Modern Drama. We will attempt to imagine how the plays would have been staged then, could be staged now. Since traditional academic method makes the history of drama one of printed dramatic texts, we will explore how theater also is a cultural creation made of choices based on visual art, architecture, music. The theater also never escapes and rarely avoids reproducing representations of gender, of race, of sexual orientation, of age, all things human and inhuman. We will consider together the theater from countries not included in the canon of "world drama," as well as the canonical works. Requirements include short papers, one extended project, active class participation and collaborative mock staging projects. This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 448. Contemporary Drama.

Section 001 The Irish Drama and the Modern World

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will consider the special role Irish writers and the Irish theater have played in constructing the shape of what we now know as modern drama. Beginning with the metropolitan plays of Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw, this course will consider the same Irish roots they share with Synge, Yeats, Lady Gregory, and O'Casey. How has this group of playwrights staged its Irishness? As we pursue this topic we will also read the plays of Samuel Beckett in order to investigate the tension between what it means to be Irish and what it means to be European. Moving our discussion to more recent times, we will discuss as well the plays of Tom Murphy, Brian Friel, Frank McGuiness, and Sebastian Barry. Plays to be considered include The Importance of Being Earnest, Mrs. Warren's Profession, The Playboy of the Western World, The Plough and the Stars, Waiting for Godot, Translations, and Observe the Sons Of Ulster Marching Toward the Somme. There will be a midterm, a final exam, and a term project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 449.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 4

Engl. 465/MARC 465. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Section 001 This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Karla Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is an anthology of stories varying in style and genre, told by similarly diverse fictional narrators. Including both the stateliness of the Knight's Tale and the ribaldry of the Miller's Tale, it creates a new audience in English for a literature simultaneously playful and serious. We will read most of the Tales, paying attention to the work's qualities as an innovative story collection. Central questions will include: How does the Canterbury Tales address its audience? What is the purpose of its interpretative openness? What relations develop between literary style and social position? We will focus especially on narrative voices and the effects they create in their readers; audio tapes will help us hear these voices in Middle English. One or two short papers, one longer paper, and a final examination. This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 American Literature to 1830. This course meets the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Scottie Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will offer you a broad introduction to the literature of North America from the first Spanish contacts through the period of the Early Republic. We will read, for example, the impassioned theological expressions of New England, narratives of captivity, conversion, and enslavement that emerged from the often violent crossing of cultures and races throughout the colonies, seduction novels by women, and the foundational documents surrounding the Revolution. My interest lies not in defining an American form or story, but in asking why certain forms emerged or were invoked and altered in response to unique historical situations. As texts which you discover yourself are often the most compelling, you will pursue a subject of your own choosing through research in microfilm and rare books, present your finds to the class, and incorporate them into a final paper. There will also be a short paper, a reading journal, and a final exam. This course meets the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 471. Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Classic American Literature. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): James Mc Intosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in some of the most engaging and demanding texts in nineteenth-century American literature, including Hawthorne's short stories and The Scarlet Letter, Melville's Moby Dick and "Bartleby," Douglass' Narrative of a Slave, Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Thoreau's Walden, major poems by Dickinson and Whitman, Twain's Huckleberry Finn and James' Daisy Miller. We will read good books rather than just study a historical period, but at the same time will pay attention to the historical trends and circumstances that inform the texts. Some subjects to be explored are: the willful originality of much American literature; the religious longings and skeptical character of the literature in an age in transition between faith and unbelief; the literary representation of landscape; the political strains of this literature in a society racked by slavery. Requirements: class participation and three papers. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 472. Twentieth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Other Americas. This course meets the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Alan Wald (awald@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In 1962, a little-known radical writer named Michael Harrington created a national sensation with his book The Other America. The title referred to all the victims of the social and economic structure in the ghettos, barrios, sweatshops and migrant shelters. Behind Harrington's work stood a long tradition of literary radicalism seeking to give voice to the experiences of the same population through fiction, poetry and drama. We will explore key texts of that tradition in 20th century literature. With Rideout's classic The Radical Novel in the US as background, we will begin with Smedley's Daughter of Earth, Roth's Call It Sleep, Wright's Native Son, and Bulosan's America Is In the Heart. Later we will view the tradition as it evolved in the 1960s, especially the African American playwright Lorraine Hansberry. Requirements: two papers, midterm, final exam. This course meets the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Patsy Yaeger (pyaeger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIB).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How does southern literature recreate American myths of regionalism, race, and gender? Why is it so obsessed with the grotesque, old children, gargantuan women, and throwaway bodies? Why do find we such a lurid preoccupation with dirt and soiling, and why is this emphasis on the earth and its spoils linked to themes of revolution, protest, and emancipation? Finally, how did the excruciating systems of racial dominance, gender hierarchy, and class prejudice lend themselves to such strange and gorgeous writing? We will focus on a series of 20th century writers: Faulkner, Porter, Warren, Hurston, Wright, Welty, McCullers, O'Connor, Taylor, Gaines, Walker, and Dove. Requirements: midterm, final, and two papers. This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 Virginia Woolf

Instructor(s): Anne Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on six major texts by Virginia Woolf, ranging from her most influential work of non-fiction, A Room of One's Own to her final and unfinished novel, Between the Acts. Each work will be considered in relationship to her other writings letters, diaries, essays as well as in the context of her cultural moment World War I, Sapphism, the city. In addition we will examine various literary critical approaches to her texts, including biographical, feminist, and cultural. Finally we will explore aspects of her larger reception in terms of the "Bloomsbury boom" and the recent films made of Orlando and Mrs. Dalloway. Students will be expected to work in small groups on materials outside of class and produce a shorter paper followed by a longer one.

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Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 Blake. This course fulfills the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): John Wright

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course studies the (scripictorial) arts of William Blake's illuminated works and other literary and artistic inventions in relation to his times and the traditions leading to and from them. Written work will include journal writing with detailed commentary on individual illuminated designs and a longer paper. This course fulfills the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of this century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable. Coursework includes one 8 page essay and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Psychoanalysis and Literature

Instructor(s): Rei Terada (terada@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we'll read the classic texts of psychoanalysis as literature, as well as works of literature and criticism that think psychoanalytically. Although you will be welcome to develop your own analytically informed interpretations of literature, the main focus of the class will be on understanding, rather than doing, psychoanalysis. We will study both early and contemporary forms, spending about a third of the course on Freud's theoretical writings and his interpretations of art and culture, from the teens through the 1930s; another third on later analytic work (from the 1960s through the 1990s) that incorporates literary theory and feminism; and another third on contemporary critical analyses of literature and culture which use psychoanalysis along with other approaches. Along the way, we'll read the fiction and see the films that are involved in the theoretical arguments. We will treat all criticism and theory as imaginative works whose own language, images, and plots can entertain and intrigue us as much as those of any work of art. Classroom procedure will depend on the wishes of the people actually in the course, but I hope for an open, seminar-like atmosphere. The main writing requirement will be a fifteen page paper, done in two stages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be an introductory survey of literary theory from the romantics to the present, but with emphasis on the exciting and absolutely fundamental changes that have taken place in the past twenty-five years. Major areas of study will include Romanticism, Modernism, New Criticism, Post-structuralism, New Historicism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism. We will be using various kinds of literary theory to help us answer basic questions about what and why we read, questions like: What gives us literary pleasure? Do authors determine the meaning of their texts, or do readers? How is literature related to society and politics? Can pornography be literature? Is there a difference between literature and propaganda? How are male readers/writers different from female readers/writers? On what principles was our literary canon established, and should it be revised? Mix of lecture/discussion, but with a strong emphasis on student participation. Two, possibly three short papers, and a final project.

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Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rex

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): June Howard (jmhoward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 Literature and Memory

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore the ways in which WRITING and MEMORY have consistently been theorized together. We will organize the course by pairing together philosophical or theoretical works (excerpts from writers ranging from Locke to Freud to some contemporary books on the controversial subjects of trauma and "recovered memories". with works of literature in order to explore what it would mean to say that there is something highly "literary" about our culture's and science's understanding of what memory is. We will try to address the following questions: What is the relationship between memory and narrative? What does it mean to conceive of the mind as a kind of writing? How do we theorize experience? How does individual memory come to have collective or cultural meaning? The literature we will read will range from Shakespeare to George Eliot to Toni Morrison. Students will pursue an individual research agenda related to our theme, which will include a class presentation, an annotated bibliography, and a final paper of 15-20 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided.

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