Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in French (Division 371)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for French.


Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. It is strongly recommended that students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test. Students must check with the Course Coordinator for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.

367/368/369 Introduction to French Literature.

The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.


French 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Section Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102 and 103.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 099 Wait List Section
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided.

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French 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See French 101. French 102 is the continuation of French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 099 Wait List Section
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided.

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French 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~pascal/French103.html

French 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in French 101/102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the course coordinator. Because students are expected to be already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace, and students will need to plan on spending at least 8-10 hours each week preparing daily lessons. The objectives and methods of instruction are similar to those of French 101/102. Quizzes (with both oral and written components) are administered to check students' assimilation of material. There are three hourly exams, a final, compositions, and speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, computer-based writing programs, the web) will be used to aid in acquiring listening and writing skills, and cultural competency.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 099 Wait List Section
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided.

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French 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 111. French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of French 111-112 does not satisfy the LSA language requirement. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to increase the reading proficiency gained in French 111. It begins with an intensive and comprehensive review of grammar and idioms, followed by special work for sight-reading. Toward midterm, students select several articles of a book in their field of specialization for outside reading, and they complete their reading on their own with frequent consultation with the instructor. Classes meet in sections of 25 students. They meet four times per week. There are weekly quizzes, course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 is built upon the work done in French 101/102. It presents intensive and comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French grammar structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on subjects of intellectual interest, to understand conversation on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099

French 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 is built upon the work done in French 101/102. It presents intensive and comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French grammar structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on subjects of intellectual interest, to understand conversation on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 is built upon the work done in French 101/102. It presents intensive and comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French grammar structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on subjects of intellectual interest, to understand conversation on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099

French 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 099 Wait List Section
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In French 232, we will discuss several cultural themes (problems in society, racism, immigration, cooking, health, socialized medicine, and World War II France). You will continue to improve speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills by reviewing vocabulary and grammar related to these themes as well as through discussion of short weekly readings (advertisements, literary excerpts, and short stories). Throughout the course of the term, students will listen to French songs, see several videos (from French television) as well as two French movies. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be two course wide tests, compositions, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 004 French Society & Culture: 1950's & 60's

Instructor(s): Carina Yervasi (cly@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Post-war France can be described as an era of modification, modernization, and change. In this course, we will focus on French films and novels as they reflect, reinforce, and critique French society from the early-1950s through the end of the 1960s. Emphasis will be placed on "national" film movements in France including pre-war Poetic Realism of the 1930s and its legacy, the thriller and film noir, the French New Wave in the late 1950s, and the political cinema of the 1960s. Although the course will underscore the importance of the stylistic and cultural dimensions of French film, it will also focus on critical debates around film, literature, and politics in France and abroad. Through the close study of films by Carne, Chabrol, Clouzot, Godard, Malle, Truffaut, Kaplan, Resnais, Rivette, Varda and fiction by Boileau-Narcejac, Duras, Queneau, Robbe-Grillet, Sagan, among others, we will draw conclusions about the relationship of "new cultural movements" consumer culture, radical political movements, youth culture, and the women's movement to France and French society in the post-war years. A strong emphasis will be placed on student participation in class discussions and writing skills. This course will be taught in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 006 Un Voyage Virtuel Au Monde Francophone

Instructor(s): Dorothy Diehl (dotb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dotb/theme.html

This course will center on the Francophone world as seen through the websites established by the various countries. It will be divided into two parts and will include a review of grammatical structures, an introduction to Francophone literature, and a discussion of current immigration problems in France. During the first half of the term, the students, working in pairs, will create an online tour guide for a country of their choice which will be linked to the course homepage on the Web. During the second half of the course, we will view a movie (you will have a choice of Chocolat, Rue des cases nègres, or Indochine) and read excerpts from works by Aimé Césaire, Albert Memmi, and others on the subject of colonialism, study the current political scene in Algeria by reading online Algerian newspapers as well as excerpts from writers such as Assia Djebar and Rachid Boujedra, and end with a discussion of current immigration problems in France as seen through online French newspapers and excerpts from Journal d'un Sans-papiers. There are no pre-requisite computer skills necessary for the course other than an interest in using the Internet and creating a homepage. One day a week will be devoted to supervised research in the Language Resource Center.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 099 Wait List Section
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided.

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French 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 002 Through Contemporary Social Issues

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will be dealing with some of the issues and problems facing today's French/Francophone society through readings (press and textbook articles), videos (documentaries, news program exposes, film) and CDs:

This "cultural" approach will offer us a jumping-off point for oral and written communication (respectively 40% and 60% of the final grade): three individual oral presentations (30%), three medium-length essays (30%) and a number of written exercises (30%). Active class participation (10%) and regular attendance are expected. (Coursepack French 235, 2 vols., Viers) at Dollar Bill [611 Church Street, course packs@dollarbillcopying.com (734) 665-9200].

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 L'Amour et La Mort

Instructor(s): Dorothy Diehl (dotb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The nineteenth century in France was a tumultuous period of transition with the old giving way to the new. Monarchies, empires, and republics rose and fell as foreign invasions and internal upheavals threatened an already unstable political atmosphere. Scientific advances were revolutionizing every aspect of the society. Doctors, writers, and painters shared a common interest in studying the mind-altering effects of opium, hashish, and cocaine. The artistic climate was as complex as the political scene with romanticism, impressionism, realism, naturalism, and symbolism vying simultaneously for public interest. Yet, despite the emphasis on change and innovation, each new movement carried within itself elements of that which preceded it.

These points of intersection will be the focus of our course as we explore the themes of love and death in representative texts and paintings of the period. Paired readings will help to highlight the contradictions and similarities of works from two different schools or genres (e.g., a deathbed scene from a romantic and a realist novel, the description of a battle in a poem and a novel, etc.). We will examine the links between the personal lives of the authors and their texts (e.g., Lamartine's "Le lac" and his grief over the death of the woman he loved, Hugo's "Demain dès l'aube" and the death of his daughter, Baudelaire's "Sur Le Tasse en prison d'Eugène Delacroix" and the effects of syphilis and drug abuse which claimed his life, Maupassant's "La peur" and the hallucinations and neuroses which led to his suicide attempt, etc.).

Over the course of the term, we will also read Zola's Thérèse Raquin as an example of a serial novel and view two films, Madame Bovary and Cyrano de Bergerac. Your grade will be based on three 2-page reaction papers, participation in class discussions and an on-line discussion group, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 Feminine Wiles in French Literature and Film

Instructor(s): Valerie Yoshimura (valeriey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Across the many roles women occupy whether wife, mother, daughter, lover, or friend one attribution has proven timeless: women's artful use of "feminine wiles," or ruse, to discreetly influence affairs. This course will explore the different valences ascribed to the use of feminine ruse by men and by women across a variety of genres from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries; for selected texts, we will compare literary representations with their cinematic (or theatrical) counterparts.

From evocations of l'adorable femme rusée to threatening images of female cunning, women are both credited and blamed for their use of ruse. We will explore such questions as: Why are women coded as cunning? To what extent is surreptitious female intervention scorned, or conversely, admired in literary texts? Do male authors adopt a significantly different attitude toward feminine wiles than women authors? Do the representations change across the centuries, or do they largely repeat the same trope?

Through close textual analysis, we will consider the power of ruse. To what extent do feminine wiles subvert, or reestablish order? Is recourse to ruse an obligation (a "necessary evil". or a freely made choice? Indeed, is recourse to ruse limited to women? Is it a particularly useful resource for the upper-or lower-classes? What can it teach us about women's knowledge and influence? Does feminine ruse have "feminist" potential? Or is such intervention more worthy of punishment? In short, is female cunning a source of power, or a sign of weakness? Can it be both?

Readings and discussion will be in French and supplemented by film representations of selected texts. In addition to active class participation, three short (5 pp) papers, a midterm and a final exam will be required.

Required texts:

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 003 Early Modern Texts, Contemporary Issues

Instructor(s): Todd Reeser (pascal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine a selection of French early modern (16th-18th century) texts from the interdisciplinary approach of Cultural Studies. The course will focus on how three current issues gender, sexuality, and race/ethnicity play themselves out in the period. Of particular interest will be chronological "gap" between early modern and modern definitions of identities (as well as between the various periods studied), the relation between early modern "culture" and "texts" (can we separate the two?), and the intersection of these forms of identity. We will look at both literary and non-literary texts to attempt to make some conclusions about early modern identities. More specifically, we will look at definitions of masculinity and femininity (Marguerite de Navarre, marriage, pedagogical discourse, 17th-century drama, the epistolary novel), homo/heterosexuality (Montaigne, medical texts), and the Turkish and new world other (17th-century drama and comedy, travel journals). There will also be some out-of-class reading in English and French dealing with important aspects of early modern culture.

Evaluation will be based on two papers, in-class writings, class presentations, participation, and a final oral interview with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

French 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Small Change: Childhood Narratives and the Politics of Learning French

Instructor(s): Jarrod Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is twofold, to introduce student to French and Francophone societies and cultures and to allow students to develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills in French, skills they will need in more advanced courses in French and Francophone studies. We shall concentrate French and Francophone childhood narratives (to be distinguished from literature written for children) in both novels and film and consider what these childhood narratives teach us about their cultural context and, especially, about the role (political, social, economic) of teaching and learning French in France and the French colonies (during the colonial period).

We shall begin with several Francophone novels to consider the relation between teaching French and colonization. Throughout the course we shall view French and Francophone films to study the representation of events such as World War II and the Algerian Revolution through childhood narratives, with special attention devoted to how childhood narratives can serve as allegories of the political conflicts to which children are sometimes thought to be immune. Finally students will have the opportunity to think about how their own experiences of learning French might relate to the narratives they will have studied. The objectives of the course will be to envision ways of learning French that empower students rather than alienate them.

This will be an intensive writing course with an emphasis on revising and rewriting as a way of improving writing skills. Students will keep a journal of reflections on the texts studied in the course. The grade will be based on class participation (contribution to class discussions on the part of every student will be crucial), journals, in-class writing assignments, and papers.

Novels:

Films:

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

French 333. French Phonetics.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, conducted in French, is designed to introduce basic concepts in phonetic theory and to help students improve their pronunciation of French through (1) study of the physical characteristics of individual sounds, the relationship between sounds and their written representations, the rules governing pronunciation of "standard" French, and (2) intensive oral practice in the production of French consonants and vowels, syllabification, intonation, liaison, and deletion/retention of the "mute E". During the first week, students will record a speech sample and will be informed of problem areas to work on independently using audio tapes. Homework for each class consists of reading theory, writing phonetic transcriptions using the International Phonetic Alphabet, and oral practice with tapes. Participation, 1-2 oral quizzes, and the final oral exam will evaluate proficiency in pronunciation. Written homework, quizzes, a midterm, and a final written exam will evaluate ability to use the phonetic alphabet and knowledge of basic theory. This is NOT a conversation class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 335. Composition and Stylistics.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a practical course in writing French. Students will analyze and imitate a variety of short samples of French writing representing a wide range of uses of the written language. We will work on ways to use and not to use dictionaries as aids to writing, and will review and clarify some points of advanced grammar as needed. Students will write regular short compositions, rewriting some of them, and will choose and complete one major writing project in an area of their choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Modern Cities/Urban Identities

Instructor(s): Alina Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The modern development of cities has changed not only geographical boundaries (the relation between town and country-side, the center and the periphery), but also the boundaries of the self. In this course we will explore some of the ways in which life in a big city affects the inhabitants' sense of themselves and of others. We will focus especially on the unexpected encounters between different social worlds (intellectuals meeting the working classes), between different cultures (French and non-European, or Francophone), and between different subcultures (bohemian, punk, or gay). The sites of these encounters will be mainly Paris, and New York, as they appear in fictional and poetic texts, painting, and film. The readings will consist of short pieces, excerpts, and newspaper articles drawn from modern(ist) and contemporary authors such as Baudelaire, Zola, Apollinaire, Breton, Aragon, Colette, Celine, Genet, Césaire, Barthes, Duras, Baudrillard. Among the films shown will be: Paris 1900, Sous les toits de Paris, La Haine. Evaluation will be based on class participation and discussion, and two short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 Roots: Narratives of Origin and the Fiction of Identity

Instructor(s): Jarrod Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Looking for one's roots, even in American culture, has often been a figurative way of describing the search for identity. In African (both Maghrebian and sub-Saharan) and Caribbean literatures and cultures, the figure of roots took on a political meaning as cultural activists sought to articulate a national identity in order to consolidate opposition to French colonial rule. After large-scale independence, formerly (and not-so-formerly) colonized peoples continue to use the notion of roots in the struggle to decolonize cultures formerly dominated by French colonialism. Often, in both contexts, roots or origins represent an attempt to recover a pre-colonial past free of colonial "contamination." In such cases, the return to roots often takes the narrative form of a journey. At the same time, however, many narratives of return to origins or roots, also question the possibility of recovering a pure past untainted by colonialism; they often propose a multiplicity of roots and a heterogeneity of origins. Politically, the effect of such re-writings of the concept of roots is an opposition to an official discourse of national purity, which discursively contributes to the consolidation of power of a post-independence national elite that attempts to define the Nation by excluding those who do not share its version of roots.

In this seminar, we shall begin by examining some of the more "conventional" narratives of return, such as Césaire's Cahier, perhaps the model for the genre. We shall then turn to more recent contributions to the trope of roots that literalize the figure as an actual tree, often an "unusual" tree, or tree that does not conform to the usual visualization of roots. Examples include the baobab, which seems to be planted upside down, with roots for branches, and the mangrove swamp, where it is impossible to tell which roots belong to which tree, where roots do not necessarily precede the tree (which may shoot down new roots from its branches and produce new trucks from its multiple roots). Throughout the course, we shall also consider the relation of such "rhizomatic" articulations of identity with such concepts as "métissage," "hybridity," and "mimicry." Since the genealogy or family tree implied in the concept of roots relies on a heterosexual system of reproduction (usually patrilinear), we shall consider the ways in which non-normative sexualities come into play in more "rhizomatic" narratives of return. Readings in post-colonial theory will be an important aspect of the seminar as well. There will be two papers and a class presentation.

Required texts (tentative):

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

French 367. Literature, History, and Culture of Early Modern France.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Writing Women (15th-17th Century)

Instructor(s): Robert Clark

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore the status of women in society and their representation in a range of texts from the fifteenth to the seventeenth century. The emphasis will be on texts by women, complemented by representative texts by male writers. Our goal will be to determine what cultural constraints were placed upon women in general and upon women writers more specifically and, secondly, the extent to which women were able to resist or subvert these constraints through action and writing.

Approximately the first half of the course will be devoted to texts from the debate on the Roman de la Rose and the subsequent Querelle des femmes of the sixteenth century. Readings on the Rose debate will include representative passages from Jean de Meun's Rose and Christine de Pizan's Epistre au dieu d'Amours. Sixteenth-century texts will include the first day of Marguerite de Navarre's Heptaméron, with its three attempted-rape narratives; the sonnet cycle of Louise Labé; and excerpts from Rabelais and Brantóme. Critical readings will include excerpts from Jacob Burckhardt's Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy and Jane Scott's classic and provocative essay, "Did Women Have a Renaissance?"

In the second part of the course, we will try to determine the extent to which women writers of the seventeenth century were successful in finding a new voice, whether it be political, as in the writings of Marie de Gournay, or authorial, as in Madame de Lafayette's Princesse de Clèves. A range of male representations of women will complement these readings: one of the contes of Perrault, the tenth Satire of Boileau, and Molière's Ecole des femmes.

Most of the readings will be in French, although a few pertinent texts will be read in English. Students will be graded on their participation in class discussion, written assignments (two shorter and one longer paper of 8-10 pages), and an oral presentation of 10-15 minutes.

Please direct all questions regarding the course to the professor at rclark@ksu.edu (until January).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 374. Problems in Society and Social Theory.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Minorities in Postcolonial World: Friendship in Francophone Film

Instructor(s): Frieda Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will concentrate on representation of images of minorities in films produced in France from the early 80's to the present time: Mehdi Charef's Le th au harem d'Archi Ahmed (1984); Thomas Gilou's Black Mic Mac (1988); Claire Denis' Chocolat (1988); Jean-Jacques Annaud's Noir et Black en couleur (1989); Coline Serreau's Maman, il y a un homme dans ton lit (1991); Mathieu Kassovitz's Café au lait (1993) and La Haine (1995). These films serve as cultural metaphors for addressing philosophical-theoretical issues on race, representation, nationality, and the positionality of minority subjectivities in French culture. These films examine not only the postcolonial situation of France but also problematized questions of national identity through contemporary issues related to race, racism, ethnicity, class, and gender. Images of minorities, like ideologies of "race," are social constructions. The connecting thread linking the films I have selected is the friendship that is portrayed between individuals of different ethnic origins. This interethnic friendship can be analyzed as an attempt to negotiate new definitions for identities that are inherently subversive to national identity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 378. Studies in Genre.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will read a selection of testimonies written in French by Holocaust and concentration camps survivors. It will include major texts by Elie Wiesel (a Hungarian Jew), Jorge Semprun (a communist), David Rousset (a trotskist), Charlotte Delbo (a woman from the French resistance), and Pierre Seel (a gay man), as well as Alain Resnais's film Nuit et brouillard and parts of Claude Lanzmann's Shoah. Beyond the issues of representation raised by the texts and movies themselves, we will discuss how the memory of the camps was also determined by the historical context in which these testimonies appeared. What does it tell us about the way French society (re)constructed itself after WW II? How has history been used, and sometimes forgotten, to serve specific social and political needs?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 AIDS in France: Literature and Politics

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

France is the European country with the highest rate of HIV and AIDS. After almost a decade of silence and denial about the seriousness of the epidemic, there has been a recent shift in public perceptions and reactions, along with an sudden increase in literary and cultural production addressing the crisis. A large number of texts have emerged essays, novels, plays, first and third person testimonials, etc.; some were so successful their authors became household names; certain films and TV programs were widely seen; activism is on the rise: AIDS has finally entered French society.

This course will focus on both the literary and the socio-political aspects of the AIDS crisis in France. It will address issues such as: the reasons for the initial period of denial, the cause(s) of the shift described above, the construction of the AIDS patient in the media and in literature, literary and political resistance to the dominant discourses on AIDS, the problems in representing the unspeakable (disaster, one's own death), the relation between the AIDS crisis and previous constructions of sameness and otherness in French culture, the way in which AIDS criticism may provide the basis for a rethinking of social relations in France today, etc.

(Tentative) Reading List:

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 380. Intermediate Business French.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235 and one additional course numbered 250 and above. A maximum of six credits of French 380, 414, and Business Administration 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Parce que le français est aussi la langue des affaires," this course will introduce you to French as the language of business, and to some socio-economical/cultural situations frequently encountered in the contemporary "Francophone" business world.

Our course will start with a general overview of France's present employment situation, of govermental policies and projects in this field; followed by some considerations of France as a socio-economic partner within the European Union, and on some possible repercussions of the introduction of a single European currency. We will then proceed through several fundamental situations any person looking, applying, or being interviewed for a job in a French-speaking context would have to face. We will also evoke some of the fundamental characteristics of French firms (types, organization); consider some of the obligations and duties an employee/employer of the Francophone professional milieu would have to perform, as well as some of the rights s/he would be entitled to (contracts, regulations, etc.). Awareness of essential cultural differences between the American and French business worlds will be another goal of this course, as well as an introduction to fundamental computer terminology.

Written, audio, and visual documents will be used in this course which will stress the quality of your oral and written expression. A variety of written exercises (resume, letters, etc.) and the role-playing of professional oral situations (job interview, telephone conversations, etc.) will each count for 40% of your final grade; 20% will be determined by your thorough preparation, active participation and regular attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 385. Contemporary France: Politics, Culture, and Society.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Cultural History of France: From 1789 to the Present

Instructor(s): Rachael Criso

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of French culture from the Revolution of 1789 to the present. The course will focus on the social changes that occurred in the wake of a series of revolutions (1789, 1830, 1848, 1871), and the development of the modern political State. Slides, movies, and texts will help us understand the aesthetic movements, official and marginal, that shaped the period: Romanticism, Symbolism, Decadence, Surrealism, contemporary thought. Special attention will be given to developments in the arts and architecture, from David to the Centre Pompidou and the Orsay Museum. Conducted in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

French 450. Special Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Jean Genet and Minorities: A Process of Aesthetization

Instructor(s): Frieda Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The question of minority occupies an important place in modern literature and critical theory precisely because we live in more diverse societies. Jean Genet has been characterized as a political writer with interests in class and race. This course focuses on his work and his representation of minorities. We will examine how Genet's work urges us to make a conscious choice to rethink our views on gender, color, and culture and to create a society in which diversity is accepted, encouraged, and made central to everyday life.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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