Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in German (Division 379)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for German.


German 101. Elementary Course.

Section 001, 002 Students Must Elect one Lecture (001 or 002) & one Recitation (010-014)
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Please Note: the structure of the beginning German courses (101 and 102) has radically changed. All day-time sections meet collectively for a single hourly lecture once a week (Either on Mondays 12-1 or on Mondays 2-3). Hourly recitation sections meet for three hours a week (Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays; no class on Fridays). You must be concurrently enrolled in the lecture section and a recitation section.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels and in all spheres of the language acquisition process. The unique combination of a weekly group lecture and individual hourly recitation sections is intended to ensure that the course work corresponds to the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners. The weekly lecture period is devoted to chapter quizzes and presentation of basic points of grammar, as well as linguistic and analytic strategies. Students learn not only the German language itself, but also about language and the language learning process more generally. During the weeks in which there are no chapter quizzes, a portion of the lecture period includes presentations on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, and literature. Thus, students are presented with the immediate intellectual applications of their foreign language study and are prepared to take advantage of the developing language opportunities at the U of M, such as the specialty 232 courses, LAC courses and the expanding German Studies program. In the recitation sessions students practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term students have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and are able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations. Students develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 102. Elementary Course.

Section 001, 002 Students Must Elect one Lecture (001 or 002) & one Recitation (011-016)
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 102 completes the two-term sequence of Michigan's innovative introductory German language program. The course continues to focus systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels and in all spheres of the language acquisition process. The unique combination of a weekly group lecture and individual hourly recitation sections is intended to ensure that the course work corresponds to the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners.

The weekly lecture period is devoted to chapter tests and presentation of basic points of grammar, as well as linguistic and analytic strategies. Students continue to learn not only the German language itself, but also about language and the language learning process more generally. During the weeks in which there are no chapter quizzes, a portion of the lecture period includes presentations on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, and literature. Thus, students are presented with the immediate intellectual applications of their foreign language study and are prepared to take advantage of the developing language opportunities at the U of M, such as the specialty 232 courses, LAC courses, and the expanding German Studies program. In the recitation sessions students practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term, students have a firm foundation in the fundamental elements of German grammar and are able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and a number of conversational situations. Students also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and to success in other academic fields.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 102. Elementary Course.

Section 100 Night Section
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The night section (M Th 7-9) will be coordinated with, but taught separately from the day sections, which will allow non-traditional night students to be able to attend both evening lecture and recitation sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 103. Review of Elementary German.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. Although this course focuses intensively on grammar review and vocabulary development, course work systematically addresses all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) so that students are sufficiently prepared for more advanced university courses both within and outside of the German Department. By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of German texts and conversational situations. Students will also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. Most importantly students will find that studying German in a university setting will not only be intellectually stimulating and fun, but will become useful in a number of ways throughout their academic careers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, and one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 206. Conversation Practice.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103. Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level conversation course may not register for 205 or 206. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this class may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in German 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous German 305 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 231. Second-Year Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. Reading texts include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and write about short texts from periodicals and textbooks, and from classic texts by Nietzsche, Kafka, etc., independently, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.) regular attendance, video assignments, three in-class tests, and a final examination. Instruction is in German and English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course completes the four-term introductory language sequence. Each section of this course addresses a special topic with the goal of introducing students to the study of an academic discipline, such as Music, Philosophy, History, or Science, in German. Students should emerge from the course prepared and motivated to do work (or read for pleasure) in this field throughout their academic career and beyond. Students are strongly encouraged to arrange their schedules so they can enroll in the section whose topic interests them the most, in order to get the maximum benefit from this course. Interest in the course content is the most effective motivation for language study, and students can emerge from 232 with the genuine pride in what they are able to do with their German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 001 Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm: Their Lives, Scholarship, and Collection of Fairy Tales

Instructor(s): Bruce Spencer

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the lives of the nineteenth-century scholars Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. Due to their ever-popular collection of fairy tales, the Brothers Grimm have become household names around the world. The primary goal of the course will be to situate the most famous work of the Brothers Grimm into their wideranging scholarly interests. The course will begin with a biographical introduction to their lives and the breadth of their scholarship. Both the intellectual motivations behind the fairy tale project and the manner in which the tales were collected wilt be explored in depth. The course will devote time to a number of tales, including many that are not well known in the U.S.

A wide range of materials and assignments will be employed in the course. Required texts include an edition of the tales and a course pack containing excerpts from biographies of the Brothers Grimm, passages from the Grimms' scholarly publications and personal correspondence, and exercises to improve students' reading and writing skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 002 The German Conception of History

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This special theme section explores the problem of History in modern German culture. Modern historical science emerged in German-language Europe in the nineteenth century, and its development was linked to the process of nation-building particular to Germany. Today, too, discussions of German politics, national identity, and culture are saturated with the "problem" of recent German history, in particular the shadow of the Nazi past. In this course we will explore the language of German history as it moved through various stages: Romantic notions of the Volk community; the link between emergent German 'historicism' and the conservative ideal of the authoritarian State, Nietzsche's dramatic repudiation of historicism right up through the fiery public "Historians' Debate" of the 1980s about the significance of the Holocaust and the right of the Germans to a "normal" history. Students will work through the texts with the assistance of a computer module which will help make connections between the texts and also provide glossary definitions, maps and timelines, visual and audio-visual sources, and workbook exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 004 Contemporary German Society

Instructor(s): Janet Van Valkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

While building a basic vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading a variety of authentic texts dealing with racial diversity in German society. We will look at Germany's past history and the roll it played in Germany's present racial attitudes and practices. We will be considering such topics as: the development of racism in Germany; Nazi Germany; the place of foreigners in German society; achieving German citizenship; the rise of right wing racist radical groups; the attitude toward and the treatment of other minority groups; and Germany, the EU, and racism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 005 Mathematical and Scientific German

Instructor(s): Hartmut Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course serves as an excellent introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields. In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History; students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested); etc. In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 007 Cultural Anthropology in German

Instructor(s): Vanessa Agnew

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Lost tribes and tropical beaches, curios and cannibals are all thought to be the business of anthropology. In this course, we will test some of these assumptions as students gain an introduction to the discipline. Focusing on the work of German anthropologists, the course will trace the historical development of the discipline by examining anthropology's origins in the late eighteenth century. We will look at anthropology's contribution to colonialism and Nazi ideology and, more recently, the trend towards an ethical reevaluation of the field. Students will read texts by key thinkers, watch early ethnographic films, visit museums and have the opportunity to do some participant observation of their own by undertaking a small fieldwork project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 008 Mathematical and Scientific German

Instructor(s): Fredrick Amrine (amrine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will spend several weeks each reading, discussing, and actually doing some basic Math, Computer, Physics, Astronomy, and Biology work in German (just as Einstein learned to do these things in English...). The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. This should be easier than it perhaps sounds, because the technical terms are usually very similar in German and English, and there is a clear context for guessing the meaning of unknown words. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, and exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 009 Topics in Music: Mozart and the Magic Flute

Instructor(s): Joseph Bailey (jfbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course relies heavily on singing to become acquainted with the opera: by the end of the term, we will sing the entire opera. In addition, there will be one week of vocal instruction. Guest lecturers and performers will include musicologists, stage technicians, musicians, and specialists in Viennese culture. Readings in German will include the opera libretto, highlights in Mozart's biography, and the cultural and historical background of the work's origin. The language of instruction is German. Student evaluation is based on performance in class participation, regular grammar exercises, essays, oral presentations, and final exam. There are no musical prerequisites for this section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 010 German Art History: Visual Expressionism

Instructor(s): Michael Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed as an introduction to the language and issues of twentieth-century art history in Germany, focusing on the Expressionist movement of the 1910's and 1920's. Beginning with an overview of German visual art and its art history prior to the development of Expressionism, we will go on to discuss the artistic works and writings of artists associated with die Brticke, the Blaue Reiter and other Expressionist groups. We will also look at periodicals that sought to bring the works of Expressionism to greater public awareness. We will consider contemporary criticism of Expressionism as well as the later "Expressionism Debate" among European intellectuals in the 1930's, and the Nazi denigration of Expressionism as a form of "Degenerate Art." Texts include manifestoes and other short writings, contemporary criticism, cultural political documents of the Third Reich. Taught in German with numerous slide presentations and at least one museum visit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 011 Classics of German Literature
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section we will examine a number of works written by eminent authors during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth century. While this is not a course in literary history, literary, cultural, and socio-political developments will be touched upon. Texts will be read at a moderate pace so that there is ample opportunity to explore their meanings. In order to enhance the students' understanding of these works and to improve their German class participation will be encouraged. To that same end a fair amount of writing will be integral to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 306. Conversation Practice.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level conversation course may not register for 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students entering this stage of the German conversation-cycle do not need to have taken German 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a German 325 (or higher) class. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to appreciate fully the life in German-speaking communities. In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 307. German for Medicine.

Instructor(s): Hartmut Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, students will read a variety of texts of special interest to students interested in studying medicine. Readings will be taken from scientific and medical textbooks used by Medizinstudenten at German universities. Class time will be devoted to clarification of the content of the readings, and, where applicable, to a discussion of theoretical and ethical issues raised by the texts. Course requirements include attendance and participation, readings, learning vocabulary, and two small group presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 326. Intermediate German.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German. Up to one third of class time will be spent on grammar review and a weekly composition provides the opportunity to practice grammatical rules and to develop stylistic flexibility. Class activities are informal and varied, but German is used throughout the meetings. There will be ample opportunity for group discussions as well as for brief presentations by each student. Audio and video tapes will be used repeatedly during the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 326. Intermediate German.

Section 001 Berlin, Berlin

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course takes its title from a 1987 exhibit in celebration of Berlin's 750th anniversary. Despite the long history of this city, it has been a quintessentially "modern" metropolis for most of the 20th century. In this course, we will study the transformations of Berlin's urban landscape by looking at the city's cultural representations. How do poetry, essays, novels, and films map the city? How have the city's division and reunification affected the production of Berlin's cultural image? The readings from different historical periods will focus on changing representations of key sites such as the "Potsdamer Platz" or "The Wall". on the interplay between gender and the metropolis, and on the different metaphors through which authors and filmmakers have described this city.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 326. Intermediate German.

Section 002 German Expressionism

Instructor(s): Micheal Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers an introduction to the extremely broad dimensions of Expressionism, the artistic movement or period between around 1910 and 1920 that in many ways defined the art and literature produced in Germany in this time. Expressionism was never a single defined movement or style, but a kind of confederation of styles and movements than took quite different forms in different parts of the country, in different artistic media, and in the different aesthetic and political convictions of the artists we loosely group together around the term. The intention of this course is to focus on the integrations that different movements and their representative artists tried to effect in their art. Expressionism was, among other things, an effort to break down the barriers that separate one artistic medium from another, and the barriers that separate art from life. In this course, we will investigate theoretical and critical writings by poets and painters, poetry and theatrical works written by visual artists, paintings produced by musical composers, and political actions and manifestos undertaken by writers and publishers. We will also look at synthetic artworks, from the illustrated texts produced by writer/artists to the stage compositions and colored-light music that were proposed as new and revolutionary art forms. In addition to poetry and other literary texts, the course will examine Expressionism in the visual arts, in theater and film, and in music. Particular attention will be given to the efforts of Expressionist artists to form communities and develop publics, and the political commitments behind these notions of community. We will also examine the confrontation of Expressionism with the First World War and the failed revolution of 1918, two monumental events that led in many ways to the death of Expressionism. Finally, we will look at the assessments that followed the death of Expressionism, in both the famous "Expressionism Debate" of the 1930's and the National Socialist attack on Expressionism as "Degenerate Art." All readings in German. Discussion in German and English.

There will be one midterm paper and a longer final paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. All students will also participate in class projects in the final week of the course. These projects include a recreation of an evening's program at the Neopathetisches Cabaret, the staging of an Expressionist drama, or the performance of a musical work. Other projects to be developed in consultation with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 326. Intermediate German.

Section 003 Alltagsdeutsch

Instructor(s): Roy Cowen (rcowen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses the needs of students who have a command of the essentials of grammar but would like to improve their active knowledge of what could be called "bread and butter" German, albeit as that which is necessary in the "Land der Dichter und Denker." Consequently, the emphasis will be on the students' participation through speaking and writing; culled from newspapers, factual prose and literature, the readings will be chosen less for their exclusively informational value than for the opportunity they also offer for discussion. Not quizzes and tests but papers will be stressed. German is the language in the classroom, and all papers will be rewritten to incorporate all changes suggested and all corrections made.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 326. Intermediate German.

Section 004 The World According To Alma

Instructor(s): Robert Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As we read selections from Alma Mahler Werfel's autobiography, Mein Leben, we shall look into the lives and works of artists, writers, composers, and political figures with whom she came into contact, including her several lovers and spouses, and try to understand one of the paradoxes of early 20th-century Vienna, namely how art could flourish so brilliantly in the shadow of impending chaos. Readings from Alma's autobiography will be supplemented by videos, paintings by Oskar Kokoschka, Gustav Klimt, Egon Scheele, musical compositions by herself, Arnold Schönberg, Alban Berg, Ernst Krenek and Gustav Mahler, and passages from the works of contemporary writers and political figures. Class time will be devoted to students' oral presentations, viewing videos and paintings, listening to music, surveying the politics and society of the time, and discussions. Matters of grammar and style will be treated according to the needs of the students. Requirements: one brief oral presentation per week, active participation in class discussions, one short written report every second week, and one 10-page term paper. Alles auf Deutsch, natürlich. Required text: a course pack. Optional but strongly recommended: Martin Durrell, Hammer's German Grammar and Usage, 3rd ed., and a good German-English/English-German dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 329. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama.

Instructor(s): Roy Cowen (rcowen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The texts provide an introduction to German dramas of the 19th and 20th centuries. These dramas reflect not only the main literary but also the significant cultural and political trends of the period. In conjunction with German 381, 383, 384, or 385, this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of individual plays, but the instructor will include some biographical, literary, and historical background. The texts are by Hauptmann, Schnitzler, Kaiser, Brecht, Dürrenmatt, and Frisch. The major language is German, but not exclusively. A term paper will be assigned. It may be in English. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 383. German Lyric Poetry.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What better way to explore a foreign language and culture than to read its poetry? Poems are small texts, condensed and inventive texts that invite close readings.

In this course, we will venture into the rich tradition of German poetry throughout the ages. We will discuss examples of medieval Minnesang, Baroque sonetts, modern nonsense poetry as well as delve into German Romantic poems (many of which have been set to music) and popular songs. Rather than aiming to be exhaustive, at the end of the course we will arrive at a typology of poetic texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 402. German Thought from Marx to Wittgenstein.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 The Origins of Modern Thought. Meets with History 416.001

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas will take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, a midterm exam, and a final paper.

Students taking the course for German credit will meet for one additional hour per week to focus on German thinkers and read original texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 406. Conversation Practice.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a résumé and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities. The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This class is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 426. Advanced German.

Instructor(s): Hermann Weiss (hfweiss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325/326. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Various approaches will be used to improve the students' proficiency. Written assignments include a weekly composition. Several times during the term students are required to listen to tapes or watch video-cassettes concerning the history, culture, or politics of the German-speaking countries in order to use them as departure points for compositions or discussion. Readings include articles of topical interest, stories, poems, and so forth. Class members are expected to give several brief presentations and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as class participation. German will be used exclusively in this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 430/Bus. Admin. 499. Doing Business in German.

Instructor(s): Janet Van Valkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 350, or one 300-level courses beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goals of German 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre." This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgeably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 German and Austrian Directors in Hollywood. Meets with Film & Video 455.003. 16 MM VHS & Laser Disk

Instructor(s): Edward Dimendberg (eddimend@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will investigate the contributions of German and Austrian film directors to the development of the narrative and stylistic lexicon of Hollywood cinema. Through a close analysis of films by Fritz Lang, Billy Wilder, Robert Siodmak, F.W. Murnau, Edgar G. Ulmer, and others, we will seek to understand how these filmmakers understood European cinema, the Hollywood film industry, the experience of exile, and American politics, culture, and society. Special attention will be devoted to their elaboration of American film genres, especially film noir. Readings in film and cultural history. Course requirements "include regular attendance at film screenings and class meetings, and the completion of a midterm examination and a final paper. For those interested in doing some of the coursework in German, students may enroll in University Courses 490, for one credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 002 Contemporary German Social Thought

Instructor(s): Claudia Ritter (ritterc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Contemporary social and political thought has been developed against the background of the experiences of German fascism and is inspired by the Deutsche Ideologie. The regional location of the German society(ies), being situated between West and East Europe, creates a further impact on German thought. Critical Theory results from that context as an ambitious attempt to create theory and science politics. It developed a broad diversification of interdisciplinary reflections on German and modern society, encompassing political and social philosophy, as well as psychology and cultural sciences. Although often criticized for its highly abstract theoretical arguments and its sometimes rather pessimistic conclusions, the different approaches of critical theory still offer an often-used theoretical background for current scholarly attempts to analyze modern societies.

In opposition to this school, another anti-fascistic project, state socialism as theory, embodied a rather optimistic vision of modern societies. Its theoretical presumptions were used as the basis for different disciplines and were much less interdisciplinary, sometimes one-dimensional, and often founded on natural science. The idea of state socialism is one of those very few examples of a theory of a new society, which people tried to implement in reality.

In distinction to this idea of socializing society, embedded in a revolutionary tradition and carried out in the Central and eastern European context, discourse theory was developed as a West German answer. Again, the question of how to bring together different disciplines and theories shapes this concept of the learning potential of modern societies. Together with its critical counterpart, postmodern and deconstruction theory, discourse theory is inspiring today's ideas from feminist, multicultural and subcultural perspectives. In this context the methods of interdisciplinary work have undergone an impressive opening of their strategies.

Students do not need a special knowledge of German social and political thought. The course will offer an overview of contemporary German social thought through comprehensive readings. There will be an oral midterm and a written final exam. Students will also be given several short written assignments. Regular attendance, reading of the texts and participation in discussions are requested. Students who are interested in reading social thought in German will have the opportunity to take an additional one credit Language Across the Curriculum course given by Claudia Ritter. The syllabus will be adapted to the particular language levels and further wishes of the students. Time and place will be by agreement. For further information, please contact ritterc@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 450. Medieval German Literature in Modern German Translation.

Section 001 Parzival: Hero for All Times?

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond 232. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No other novel of the German Middle Ages has inspired modern poets, authors, and playwrights as perseveringly as Wolfram von Eschenbach's wondrous tale of Parzival and his adventurous quest for the Holy Grail. In this course we will engage in a dialogue between the distant past and our present. We will read Wolfram's epic (in a modern German translation) as well as more contemporary adaptations ranging from Richard Wagner's opera to most recent texts. We will not only take Parzival as a guide to medieval culture and topics like childhood, tournament, etc., but we will also explore the changing matrix of literary production, of writing and reading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 455. Nineteenth-Century German Fiction.

Instructor(s): Hermann Weiss (hfweiss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objective of this course is to introduce the students to significant works of German fiction of the nineteenth century. Particular attention will be given to the novelle whose development during this period constitutes one of the major achievements of German literature. Works representing Romanticism (Tieck, Hoffmann), the Biedermeierzeit (Buchner, Gotthelf, Stifter), and Realism (Keller, Meyer, Storm, Fontane) will be explored. Student participation will be encouraged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 492. German Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 517(417)/Ling. 517/Anthro. 519. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

German Literature and Culture in English

Instructor(s): Sarah Thomason

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 11:28 AM on Fri, Feb 5, 1999.