Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies (Division 389)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.


HJCS 100/AAPTIS 100/ACABS 100/Hist. 132. Peoples of the Middle East.

Instructor(s): Eric Hanne

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew, II.

Instructor(s): Pauli Weizman

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 101. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew, language laboratory drills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew, II.

Instructor(s): Doran Lamm (dlamm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 101. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew, language laboratory drills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II.

Instructor(s): Cobi Sacerdoti (yaakovas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 201. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Hebrew 312. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of instruction will be on the four language skills with a continued emphasis on oral work and writing. In addition to continued study of morphology and syntax, some readings selections in fiction and non-fiction prose will be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

HJCS 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II.

Instructor(s): Doran Lamm (dlamm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 201. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Hebrew 312. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of instruction will be on the four language skills with a continued emphasis on oral work and writing. In addition to continued study of morphology and syntax, some readings selections in fiction and non-fiction prose will be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

HJCS 302. Advanced Hebrew, II.

Instructor(s): Marc Bernstein (marcsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 301. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a continuation of the Hebrew sequence comprising the second term of the third year Hebrew class. (Participation in Hebrew 301 offered in the previous term is not required if the student is at the advanced level.) The focus will be on developing proficiency in all five languages skills. Student participation is an essential part of the course. Readings will include short works of fiction as well as journalistic pieces. This will be supplemented by other media including music, video, recordings, readings, etc. Students' grades will be determined on the basis of assignments, participation (including in-class presentations), and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

HJCS 379/Judaic Studies 379. Jewish Civilization.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Lectures on topics in Jewish Intellectual History, with emphasis on historical processes. Some of the topics are: Monotheism, the Origin of Evil, the Covenant, the Oral and the Written Torah, the Canon, the Calendar, Universalism, Messianism. Students are evaluated on the basis of two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3 or 4

HJCS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HJCS 471. Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature, I.

Instructor(s): Marc Bernstein (marcsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 302. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers students the opportunity to read a wide range of unabridged literary texts from a variety of genres children's literature, poetry, drama, short stories, journalism. Students will acquire the vocabulary necessary for analysis of the texts. The course will be run on a seminar basis with student participation comprising an important component. There will be short assignments in which students will work on improving their written and oral communication skills. The course will incorporate other communications media, and guest lecturers. An advanced knowledge of Hebrew required (completion of Hebrew 302 or Hebrew 402 or equivalent).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 478/Judaic Studies 468/Rel. 469. Jewish Mysticism.

Instructor(s): Elliot Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe, meditational practices, and social ramifications. While we will survey mystical traditions from the late second Temple period through modernity, the central focus will be on the rich medieval stream known as kabbalah. Among the issues to be explored are: the nature of mystical experience; images of God, world, and Person; sexual and gender symbolism (images of the male and female); the problem of evil; mysticism, language, and silence; mysticism and the law; mysticism and community; meditative and ecstatic practices (ranging from visualization to chant, letter combination, and modulated breathing); kabbalistic myth and ritual innovation; and kabbalistic interpretations of history. Modern interpretations of mysticism will also be considered. Readings for the course consist of secondary sources from the history of Judaism and comparative religion, and selected primary texts (in translation). Requirements include two exams and a research paper. Class lectures will be supplemented by discussion, contemplative exercises, and on occasion, music and other media.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

HJCS 489/Judaic Studies 489. The Cycle of the Jewish Year.

Instructor(s): Josef Tabory (taborj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A description of the Jewish calendar and its history as the basis for the Jewish yearly cycle will be followed by a short history of the major elements of each special day of the year, beginning with Biblical origins (where appropriate) and showing, through textual study, how these days have been interpreted and reinterpreted through the ages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Section 001 Aggadic Literature

Instructor(s): Josef Tabory (taborj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Aggadic literature consists of all Rabbinic literature other than the legal (halakhic) literature. Thus, it contains not only Rabbinic commentaries on the Bible, but also Rabbinic ethnics and beliefs, folk literature, stories, and legends. This course will attempt to understand the genre and methodology of each one. Texts will be studied in translation and the general survey will be followed by in-depth analysis of one midrash.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

No Description Provided.

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HJCS 577/Judaic Studies 467/Rel. 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism.

Section 001 Models of Jewish Renewal

Instructor(s): Elliot Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar explores several key examples of Jewish spiritual questing and renewal in the 20th century. Among the sources to be explored are Martin Buber and this theology of the holiness of relationship (pan-sacramental urge); the communitarian "religion of labor" and longing for wholeness developed by early Zionist writers and kibbutzniks; the intentional community around Kalonymous Kalman Shapira, the rebbe of the Warsaw ghetto, who developed a mystical fellowship and practice of soul-quieting/silence that bears interesting parallels to Vipassana mediation. Over half the course will be devoted to works (texts, memoirs, theology, devotional music) emerging from the so-called "Jewish renewal movement," which seeks sources as diverse as feminism, deep ecology, East Asian contemplative traditions, and "the politics of meaning." Authors to read include Arthur Green, Arthur Waskow, Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, Judith Plaskow, Tikkun magazine editor Michael Lerner, Tirzah Firestone, Sylvia Boorstein, and Rodger Kamenetz. (These latter figures explore the growing contemporary interchange between certain Buddhist and Jewish practices). We ask: how do these experiments alter/depart from/up-end/deepen traditional Jewish practices and spiritual direction? In so doing we raise questions regarding the multi-form shape and volatile nature of "Judaism" at the turn of the 21st century. As a final counterpart (or exclamation point), we will explore examples of engaged Orthodox renewal, and the spiritual skepticism and quest of Leon Wieseltier. The course is conducted as a seminar, with a good deal of give-and-take. It calls for both intellectual rigor and engagement: to understand Judaism not only as "argument" but as "deep song". Occasional film, music, and examples of contemplative practice will deepen our inquiry. Background in Judaic Studies or the study of Religion (including contemplative practice) will deepen our inquiry. Background in Judaic Studies or the study of Religion (including contemplative traditions) is helpful. Short essays, term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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