Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in History (Division 390)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for History.


History 111. Modern Europe.

Section 001 Europe in Transition: 1715-1945

Instructor(s): Laura Downs (bombe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 110 is recommended as prerequisite. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the history of Europe from the early 18th century ("Age of Enlightenment") through the end of the Second World War. This was an era of rapid political transformation and unprecedented economic expansion, broadly speaking. Our course will thus explore both social experiences of and intellectual/political responses to the disruptive forces of urban and industrial development, war and revolution that have marked the modern and contemporary eras in Europe. We will also consider some of the analytic approaches that historians have developed in their ongoing effort to comprehend the diverse forces that have shaped this recent past.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 122/Asian Studies 122. Modern Transformation of East Asia.

Instructor(s): Tom Buoye (tmbuoye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course treats the modern experience of China, Japan, and Korea. We shall discuss comparatively the social and political orders in each country before the advent of a powerful Western intrusion, and then explore the ways that these old civilizations handled the new calculus of power in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will attempt a broad look at the many sources of change and the varieties of their expression in the modern period. Topics will include the resulting cultural turbulence and reconstruction, reform and revolution, colonialism and liberation, the changing roles of women, the economic transformation of recent decades, and the interplay of authoritarianism and democracy. The course combines lectures and discussion. Readings will be drawn from historical narratives and translated expressions of East Asian voices. There will be a midterm exam, a term paper, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2-3 Waitlist Code: 4


History 132/AAPTIS 100/ACABS 100/HJCS 100. Peoples of the Middle East.

Instructor(s): Eric Hanne

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit ARTS

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 152/Asian Studies 112. Southeast Asian Civilization.

Instructor(s): Victor Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Muslim, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since 1945, the Vietnam War. Until recently it had the world's fastest growing regional economy, and it remains an area of great importance to Japan as well as the United States. This course offers an introduction (and thus assumes no prior knowledge) to Southeast Asian history from the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the indigenous political reaction of which Vietnamese Communism and the Vietnam Wars were one expression and the contemporary economic scene. The course seeks to define Southeast Asia's uniqueness as well as its evolving ties to the rest of the world. Midterm, final, and optional paper. Two lectures, one discussion section per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4


History 160. United States to 1865.

Instructor(s): David Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture/discussion course will examine central issues and events in the history of the territories that became the United States, and the peoples who lived there, from the late 16th to the middle of the 19th centuries. Among the topics that will be considered are: the territorial expansions of Europeans into the Americas; the creation of Anglo-American colonies; the social, political, and cultural orders of British North America; the creation of an independent American republic in the Revolution; and the destruction of that first republic in the War Between the States. The required readings will include both primary and secondary sources, and will be examined in weekly discussion sections. There will be both a midterm and a final examination, and active class participation will be expected in the sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

Instructor(s): W. Andrew Achenbaum

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

History 161 has three basic objectives. First, we expect you to gain a better understanding of some of the social, cultural, political, economic, and demographic forces that have shaped the American experience since the Civil War. Lectures, discussion sections, and readings will focus on transformations in the labor force and workplace; the significance of race, ethnicity, gender and class in defining American identities; changes in family life and community networks; and the shifting scope of the public and private sectors. Second, the staff wants you to refine basic reading and writing skills that can be applied throughout your undergraduate education. There will be a midterm and final examination and several short papers. Finally, the course is designed to give you some historical direction as you think about where you are heading and why.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 2


History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 Criminal Responsibility in Anglo-American History

Instructor(s): Thomas Green (tagreen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar deals with several fundamental issues in western civilization as they have manifested themselves in the Anglo-American past: the requisites for criminal guilt; the means of determining whether one possesses those requisites (typically, the criminal trial); and the most common justifications for imposition of punishment (retribution, deterrence, and reform). We shall study these matters in relation to two central ideas of freedom: political liberty and human free will. Special attention will be given to: the history of the jury as a "buffer" between the state and the individual or the community; the manner in which challenges to the presumption that humans possess the ability freely to control their behavior have shaped the institutions and ideas of Anglo-American criminal justice. Students will analyze and discuss primary sources and recent historical writings and will write several short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5; E-mail instructor (tagreen@umich.edu) expressing interest. DO NOT attend unless given permission to do so.


History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Cuba and the United States: Ties of Singular Intimacy

Instructor(s): Rebecca Scott

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How and why has an island in the Caribbean mattered so much to the government and people of the United States; and how and why has a northern neighbor mattered so much to the island of Cuba? This seminar will examine the intertwined histories of the United States and Cuba, focusing on questions as urgent as race and social movements, and topics as important to both cultures as music and baseball. We will draw on some primary documents in translation, and secondary works by Louis A. Perez, Jr., Alejandro de la Fuente, Thomas Paterson, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 The British Empire

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswamy

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This first-year seminar focuses on the establishment of British colonial rule in the Americas, Asia, and Africa from the 16th through the 20th centuries. We will consider the political, economic, and cultural forces at work during this period. Themes of the seminar include: race, gender, and sexuality; travel and exploration; ideologies of colonial rule; the economics of empire; and resistance to imperialism and criticisms of empire that emerged in both Britain and its colonies by the 20th century. We will explore such themes through novels and nationalist memoirs; women's writings; travel literature; and films.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 201. Rome.

Section 001 The Roman Empire and its Heirs

Instructor(s): Raymond Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of Roman history from the consolidation of the Roman empire in the second century B.C. to the rise of its political heirs in the Mediterranean world in the eighth century A.D. Topics to be discussed include Rome's overseas expansion; the administration of a large empire; the impact of Christianity; the conversion of Constantine; heresy and the imposition of orthodoxy; barbarian kingdoms; Justinian's reconquest; the rise of Islam; and the coronation of Charlemagne as a revived Roman emperor. Readings will include many ancient texts in translation and some modern scholarship. Final grade is based on two tests, frequent written exercises, and participation in discussions. No prerequisites; everyone welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1, maybe 2 Waitlist Code: 1


History 211/MARC 211. Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will study the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the time of the Crusades, when contacts with the East were reestablished, to the discovery of the New World, when European expansion moved west over the Atlantic. Some important themes will be the nature of institutions of governance; patterns of economic and demographic development; movements in religious and intellectual life. Particular attention will be paid to the relations between cultures: the central European nations and the peoples incorporated by European expansion; Christian, Jew, and Muslim; European West and Chinese/Mongol East. Modern interpretations of the period will be supplemented with texts from the period. In addition to a midterm and a final examination, students will write two short papers. There are two lectures and one discussion session per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2


History 220. Survey of British History to 1688.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the sweep of English history from Roman times until the Glorious Revolution. The first half of it is devoted to the Middle Ages and focuses on the formation of the English monarchy, the role of the church in politics and culture, and basic social and economic structures. The second half treats the early modern period (c.1450-1700) and concentrates on the growth of the state, the Protestant Reformation, the English Revolution, and the social and economic changes that followed the Black Death and played themselves out during the reigns of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. No prior knowledge of English history is assumed in this class, and it is intended to serve as the basis for more advanced work in British history and to provide background and comparisons for courses in English literature and European and American history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 249/Korean 249. Introduction to Korean Civilization.

Instructor(s): Eun-su Cho (eunsucho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Korean 249.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2


History 255. Gandhi's India.

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswamy

Prerequisites & Distribution: History 151 recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This survey course on modern India introduces the subcontinent in all its rich historical and cultural diversity, focusing in particular on the period of British colonialism from the 18th century to 1947. We will look at this history through the eyes of "Mahatma" Gandhi and several of his contemporaries, whose perceptions we will supplement with novels, women's writings, and films. The aim of the course is to understand the extent to which the "India" of Gandhi's times is a product of both its traditional past, as well of the modern global processes of colonialism, capitalism, and nationalism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 265. A History of the University of Michigan.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Steneck, Steneck

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hist265/

The University of Michigan has been a leader in shaping the modern American university. The course will examine this heritage and history from the perspectives of students, faculty, fields of study, administration, etc. It will explore the factors that have shaped the University and place it within the larger social, political, national, and international context. The only prerequisite is an interest in your University and its place in history. Presentation will be through lectures with slides. Grading will be based on essay/ objective exams; term project or research paper; photo quiz to acquaint students with central campus, its architecture and embellishment. Readings will be from a course pack and 2 or 3 required texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1


History 266(366). Twentieth-Century American Wars as Social and Personal Experience.

Instructor(s): Jonathan Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the American experience of war in this century. Lectures, readings, films, and discussions will focus not only on the military experience itself, but on how America's wars real and imagined have shaped the country's economy, politics, and culture. The course will also examine the processes of transmission and memory: how Americans who did not fight learned about those who did, and what all Americans have remembered or have been taught to remember about the wars of this century. Finally, we will consider how the nation's wartime conduct, at home and on the battlefield, has fit into long-standing social patterns and behavior such as our alleged propensity for violence. In brief, we will be looking at the American experience of war as inclusively as a term will allow.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 275/CAAS 231. Survey of Afro-American History, II.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a study of the history and culture of African Americans from the Civil War to the present. We will be particularly concerned with community development and political struggle to understand the ways African Americans shaped their own lives and the history and culture of the United States. We also will trace the development and centrality of race as an ideology and racism as a practice in the United States after the legal end of slavery.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4


History 309/Religion 309. The Christian Tradition in the West from Luther and Calvin to the Present.

Instructor(s): Thomas Tentler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Religion 309.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4


History 319. Europe Since 1945.

Instructor(s): Wolfe

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide a comprehensive critical introduction to European society, culture, and politics since the Second World War. Lectures and readings will cover both Eastern and Western Europe, the international arena and the national histories of particular countries, and social and cultural life as well as political developments. The course aims to explore the shaping of the contemporary world and to introduce students to societies and political cultures which are both structurally similar and fundamentally different from their own. Instruction will be via lectures and {\i ad hoc} discussion, evaluation via midterm exam and end-of-term essay. No special background is required; prejudices and preconceptions about European societies are enough.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3-4 Waitlist Code: 1


History 321. Postwar Britain.

Instructor(s): Kali Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 221 is recommended. (3). (Excl).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine Britain from World War II through he Cold War, the social and political challenges of the 1960s, the Conservative resurgence of the late 1970s, the Falklands war, and the fall of Margaret Thatcher, to the 1997 electron. Special attention will be paid to the experience of war by civilian populations; the development of a "welfare state" and subsequent challenges thereto; Britain's decline as a world power; protest movements; the nuclear disarmament and peace movements from the late 50s/early 60s through the 80s; the influence of American culture on Britain; decolonization and the participation of Asians and Africans in British culture and politics; Welsh and Scottish nationalism; the Northern Ireland question; and on-going political and cultural debates about class, education, the media, sexuality and gender roles, and Britain as a multi-cultural society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4


History 371/WS 371. Women in American History Since 1870.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1


History 373/Amer. Cult. 373. History of the U.S. West.

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W99/HS373/index.html

This is a one term course which examines the History of the American West from before European contact through the Cold War. Because of the long time period, there will be an emphasis on the themes and patterns that have shaped the American West. Topics will include Native American societies, European contact, settlement, and environmental impact. We will pay particular attention to issues surrounding ethnicity, gender, class, and labor. No previous knowledge is required, but a general background in American history will be helpful. There will also be an emphasis on reading and analyzing primary documents.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1


History 375/WS 375. A History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective.

Instructor(s): Carol Karlsen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on a single historical event, the Salem witchcraft outbreak of 1692. It explores "what happened" during this highly dramatic episode in early American history, where the Salem story fits in the larger history of witchcraft in Europe and its American colonies, and why it continues to have such a powerful hold on the popular and scholarly imagination. Beginning with original trial records and other primary documents concerning witchcraft and religion in Europe and its American colonies, students will analyze a variety of sources, including scholarly accounts of the Salem events, recent films and other fictionalized versions of it, and images of witches and witchcraft in other segments of contemporary American culture. Among the central questions to be addressed in the course are why most accused witches in the European and Euro-American witchcraft traditions were women and why the witch figure continues to be repressed primarily as female in todayís popular culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 382. History of the Jews from the Spanish Expulsion to the Eve of Enlightenment.

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (Siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W99/HS382/index.html

This course will survey major trends in Jewish history in European and Mediterranean lands from c. 1450 to c. 1700. The themes of this course include: developments in Jewish communal structure, familial structure; the question of "marrano" or converso identity; the relationship of Jews and Judaism to the Catholic Church and to the events and ideas of the Reformation; the economic, political, and theoretical relationship between the Jews and developing European states and the Ottoman empire. Specific topics to be addressed include: the impact of the expulsion of the Jews from Spain and Portugal; the emergence and spread of Lurianic Kabbalah; the development of the ghetto in the Italian states; the emergence of Jewish mercantile communities in Northern Europe and in the "New World"; the "court Jews"; male and female expressions of Jewish piety and folk-religion; the Sabbatian movement; and rabbinic authority. Texts will include Jonathan Israel's European Jewry in the Age of Mercantilism, 1550-1750; Jacob Katz's Tradition and Crisis: Jewish Society at the End of the Middle Ages; autobiographies of Leone Modena (a Venetian Rabbi) and of Gluckl of Hameln (a Jewish merchant woman of Hamburg); many additional primary sources and selections from recent scholarship. The course will be taught by lecture and discussion. Prerequisites: None. Requirements: midterm and final exams, 10-page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 or 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 392. Topics in Asian and African History.

Section 001 Health and Disease in African Worlds. Meets with CAAS 358.003

Instructor(s): Nancy Hunt

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hist392/

This course will consider health and illness, medicine and disease in diverse African worlds from the fifteenth century to the present. Designed equally for majors in History and students planning careers in the health professions in this country and abroad. No prior knowledge of Africa is assumed. Though historical in nature, the course will draw on the methodologies of medical anthropology, epidemiology, and medical sociology. It will propose health and wealth as a central theme to the history of Africans in diverse social and historical contexts, both on the African continent and in the larger Black Atlantic world. The central question will be: What happened to these deeply rooted forms of moral logic and therapeutic practice as Africans encountered new forms of wealth, inequality, and disease and new medical and healing systems associated with slave trades, colonialisms, epidemics, famines, debt and theft from the fifteenth century to the present?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 392. Topics in Asian and African History.

Section 002 Women and Children in Late Imperial China: Social, Cultural, and Medical Perspectives. Meets with History 592.001 and Womenís Studies 483.007

Instructor(s): Hsiung

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Focusing on the lives of women and children and their interaction with the environment, this course examines materials relevant to understanding the role of gender and age (or life course) in Chinese history. The course will concentrate on the Ming and Ch'ing (15-19th centuries) dynasties, but some topics will take us back to the T'ang and Sung dynasties. The course begins with an introduction to changing conditions in the domestic realm (marriage arrangements, property rights, division of labor, philosophical trends), then turns to the daily functions (learning, working, entertaining) and social obligations of women (production and reproduction), the historical variation of these experiences (due to class, religion, ethnicity), and women's subjective views on them. The course moves on to children in Chinese history, reviewing the source materials as well as conceptual and methodological concerns in uncovering children's history. Patterns of childbearing, early education, material life, childhood emotions, and children's health conditions are some of the topics under which we will trace the evolving characteristics of Chinese childhoods. We will also examine literary and artistic representations to uncover different understandings of the concept of the child. Finally, issues of gender and age will be reviewed together (for example, in the investigation of young girlhood) in the Chinese context and in social studies generally. The conceptual and theoretical implications of the Chinese case will be highlighted by comparison with the lives of women and children in studies of European and American materials. This class requires one midterm examination, one short essay, and a research paper at the end. Graduate students are expected to consult more original source materials and cross-cultural scholarly works (not necessarily in Chinese). There are no prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History.

Section 001 Native American History, 1492 to the Present. Meets with American Culture 301.003

Instructor(s): Parmenter

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

With the abandonment of earlier perspectives grounded in evolutionary and romantic stereotypes, Native American history represents today one of the most exciting, dynamic, and contentious fields of inquiry into America's past. Rather than a comprehensive survey, this course introduces students to the historical literature by taking an issues-oriented approach, covering material ranging from the debate over the Native population of North America at the time of European contact, to contemporary social and political struggles over casino gambling and the repatriation of Native American remains from academic institutions. The course stresses the ongoing complexity and change in Native American societies, and will emphasize the development and refinement of students' critical thinking skills. Required readings will include primary texts and scholarly essays and monographs, and will be supplemented with several films, and attendance at the Crisler Arena Powwow in late March. Assignments will include an in-class midterm, an 8-10 page term paper on a topic of the student's choice (selected in consultation with the instructor), and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 395. Reading Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 000 History 396 Summary Statement
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Enrollment limited to history concentrators needing ECB requirement and by override only. Apply for overrides Tuesday, Nov. 17, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., in 1024 Tisch Hall. Students may be dropped for non-attendance at the first meeting of History 396 or 397. All students must take action through Touch-tone Registration to make sure that their official schedule of courses matches the courses they are taking.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 Michigan in the Era of Industrialization. Meets with American Culture 496.007

Instructor(s): Francis Blouin (fblouin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~bhl/bhl/franclas/syllabus.htm.

This course will focus on the period in Michigan history from 1880-1930. It will examine several themes in that period including immigration, industrialization, settlement patterns, etc. A general familiarity with United States history is required. History colloquia are conducted in the seminar format and are limited to a small number of students. As a result, emphasis is placed on student participation in discussions. Each student will be required to write a major research paper that will draw on the resources of the Bentley Historical Library, which contains original manuscripts and archives relating to the history of the state. The course provides an opportunity for students to gain familiarity with a critical period in the industrial and social history of the of the U.S. and do original historical research. Grades will be based on a midterm exam, class discussion, and a seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2


History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 History of American Sexualities. Meets with American Culture 496.008

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Attitudes toward sexuality have permeated all aspects of American culture in profound ways. Slavery and racism, gender relations, family life, constructions of childhood and youth, metaphors of power in both the public and private realm, concepts of order and disorder, health and disease, politics, the nature of good and evil every aspect of American history can be accessed and understood better if read through the lens of the history of sexuality. This course will study sexual meanings, sexual behavior, systems of sexual regulation, and sexual politics throughout American history. By means of readings and discussion we will probe how and why dominant meanings of sexuality have changed over the last 400 years and attempt to better understand present dilemmas.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2


History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 003 Atlantic Dissenters in the Age of Empire

Instructor(s): J Scott

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the changing, turbulent world of the 17th and 18th century. It examines some of the social and economic consequences of the expansion of Europe through the eyes of marginal individuals and social groups religious dissenters and urban workers in Europe, sailors and pirates on the high seas and ashore, witches in New England, Native Americans in North America, rebellious Africans elsewhere in the "New World" who attempted from their different corners of the Atlantic Basin to resist dominant modes of authority and to shape alternative visions of society in the period from the English Civil War through the French Revolution. Under difficult circumstances and with varying degrees of "success," these people of divergent backgrounds, cultures, and aspirations grappled with many of the important issues which continue to occupy us today the responsibility of the individual to the group and the citizen to the state, and the relationship between workers and employers, between women and men, and among peoples of disparate cultures. Our central challenge will be twofold: both to understand our exchanges within the context of social changes affecting the entire Atlantic world, and to understand them as well on their own terms a difficult mission. Students will be encouraged and expected to think creatively, to make connections and find threads of continuity among linking events and people separated by time and space. Finally, the group will examine and assess critically how successful recent social historians and others have been in accomplishing these same goals.

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History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 004 Madness in Europe and America, 1500-1900

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The insane have always been with us, but only since the publication of Michel Foucault's famous Madness and Civilization (English tr. 1965) have they been the subject of intensive and exciting historical interest.This course will explore some of the most important works on the history of madness published since then, most of which have focused on the important changes in the conceptions of insanity and the treatment of the insane that took place between the Middle Ages and the heyday of the huge asylum in the nineteenth century. Some of the issues we shall examine include how changes in society and culture affected popular conceptions of what constituted madness, how those same changes affected the methods that were used to treat and manage the insane, how gender affected the identification of the mentally disturbed and why governments in Britain and America established increasing numbers of ever larger lunatic asylums in the nineteenth century. We shall discuss almost everything relevant from diabolical possession to celebrated madmen to the effectiveness of modern psychiatry. The class will read and discuss a heavy load of weekly readings that will familiarize all of us with the best or most suggestive historical writing that has been published about the history of madness in English. Each student will also be asked to prepare a term paper examining the original sources concerning a particular aspect of the subject. In the process of preparing this paper, students will be assisted in learning the techniques of finding a topic, locating and using research materials and composing a draft and final version of an essay. Finally, students will critique each other's work in progress, and they will exchange their completed papers, so that the course will result in a collective volume on this subject that we can all read and consult in future.

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 000 History 397 Summary Statement
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Enrollment limited to history concentrators and by override only. Apply for overrides Tuesday, Nov. 17, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., in 1024 Tisch Hall. Students may be dropped for non-attendance at the first meeting of History 396 or 397. All students must take action through Touch-tone Registration to make sure that their official schedule of courses matches the courses they are attending.

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 001 Culture, Memory & History. Meets with Anthropology 357.001

Instructor(s): Ann Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 357.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4


History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 002 The 1960s: from Old Left to New Left in Politics and Culture. Meets with American Culture 496.003

Instructor(s): Alan Wald (awald@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 496.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 003 20th Century Catholic Culture

Instructor(s): Thomas Tentler

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In 1969 a Catholic historian, a Jesuit, observed that his Church had changed more in the last four years than it had in the previous four hundred. He also noted that this observation had already become a commonplace. To understand this experience of change in belief and moral assumptions we shall read novels (some good, some not so good) written by Catholic authors (some nostalgic, some apologetic, some disaffected) written before, during, and after the decade of the 60s. To supply context and necessary information about doctrine and church authority there will be supplementary reading in reference works and other convenient secondary sources (much of it on the Internet). And we shall probably watch some movies. A tentative list of authors includes James Joyce, George Bernanos, Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh, Thomas Keneally, J. F. Powers, and David Lodge.

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 004 The American Historiographical Tradition(s)

Instructor(s): Frankel

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Recent debates over multiculturism have endowed the exploration of American history with a renewed political relevance and a sense of urgency. For historians, however, these cultural controversies and other shifts inside and outside academia (e.g., the postmodern challenge) have also prompted growing self doubt and introspection. Who can or may speak for marginal groups? What is the source, if any at all, of the historian's authority? Is there a unified "American History"? Is objective history a possibility? Rather than addressing such issues directly, this seminar will attempt to set them within their own historical context: the history of thinking, debating, and writing history in the U.S. Our starting point will be Frederick Jackson Turner's introduction of his immensely influential "Frontier Theory" in 1893. (Turner's theory, or myth, associated American democracy with frontier society, and constituted the first effort to formulate a grand thesis on the uniqueness of the American experience.) We will examine a host of past and present controversies surrounding particular historical developments and events, major conceptual debates (objectivity v. subjectivity, consensus v. particularism), as well as the relationship between academic historians and the presence of history and memory in popular culture and political discourse. Reading list is extensive; a basic familiarity with American history is imperative. (Frankel)

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 005 Technology, Colonialism, and Development

Instructor(s): Hecht

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines how technology has shaped political, cultural, and economic relationships between Western and non-Western peoples, and between the Northern and the Southern hemispheres. It begins with 19th-century European colonial missions and ends with contemporary development projects funded by international organizations. Topics include: the place of technology in European and African world-views; the role of technologies such as guns and ships in imperial conquest; how technological knowledge shapes power relationships; the emergence of large-scale projects such as irrigation schemes, mining, space satellites, and nuclear test sites; the notion of development; and more. The course is organized around readings and discussions; some films may be shown. Assignments include weekly reading, informal written responses to readings and films, class presentations, and one major writing project (15-20 pages).

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 006 Diversity and Affirmative Action: The University of Michigan as a Case Study

Instructor(s): Nicholas Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In conjunction with the Theme Semester, "Dialogues on Diversity," Margaret and Nicholas Steneck are planning to teach a special undergraduate research seminar on "Diversity and Affirmative Action: The University of Michigan as a Case Study."

The University of Michigan played a leading role in the diversification of higher education in the US. It was the first major university to admit women, enrolled African-American student as early as 1868, has had a large international student population for well over a century, and made major commitments to diversity beginning in the 1960s.

This special research seminar will provide students with the opportunity to learn more about the history of diversity and affirmative action in higher education in the US and to undertake original research on the University of Michigan as a case study in the history of diversification. We will begin the course with common readings and a few guest lecturers. Then, after an introduction to resources in the Universityís archives, students will select an aspect of diversity for further research. The later portions of the course will focus on directed research, the formal presentation of research results in class, and the completion of a final course paper/project.

While students will work on individual or small group projects during the term, there will also be a common class project the production of an original video for presentation to the University community during the Theme Semesterís capstone experience, March 27-31.

Some background on university history or the history of the University of Michigan would be helpful but not necessary. Students with experience in video production, artistic presentation, or the affirmative action dialogue are welcome to enroll. Upper-class status preferred but not required. Enrollment will be limited. Message nsteneck@umich.edu if you would like more information about the course.

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History 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

Instructor(s): John Carson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students and junior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No description provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

Instructor(s): Rudi Lindner

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students and junior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No description provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

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History 409. Byzantine Empire, 867-1453.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey taking the Byzantine Empire from the accession of the Macedonians till the Empire's fall to the Ottomans. The course focuses on both internal political history and foreign affairs (relations with the West; the great Church split between Rome and Constantinople; relations with Crusaders and with Slavic neighbors Russians, Bulgarians, and Serbs, relations with the Seljuk and Ottoman Turks). The main texts are: Ostrogorsky's History of the Byzantine State, and Jenkins' Byzantium: The Imperial Centuries; and for the final two centuries, Nichol's The Last Centuries of Byzantium. Flexible requirements: Besides the final examination, various options exist: (1) a short paper and hour exam; (2) a longer paper and no hour exam.

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History 412/MARC 414. Social and Intellectual History of the Florentine Renaissance.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

ARTS

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How did a medieval city of bankers and cloth merchants become, in the fifteenth century, the center of an original humanist culture that offered Europeans new ways of seeing and portraying themselves and their society from artistic perspective to the writing of history? The course will trace the history of renaissance Florence not only as a chronicle of its development but also as the process by which it self-consciously constituted itself as a society and a history. Among the topics taken up will be the reshaping of the city, both physically and constitutionally; the transformation of the Medici from bankers to humanist rulers; the development of humanism into an enabling code for civil life; the new valuation of wealth and the civic use of magnificence (from palaces to wedding and funeral processions); social organization and changing attitudes toward the disempowered (slaves, Jews, the poor, women); and forms of religious expression, from confronternal devotions and processions to the fire and brimstone of prophetic preachers (e.g., Savonarola). Considerable use will be made of original sources (historical, literary, and visual). This is designed as a lecture course, but there will be ample time allotted for discussion.

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History 416. Nineteenth-Century European Intellectual History.

Section 001 Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History. Meets with German 402.001

Instructor(s): Scott Spector

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 402.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 419(521). Twentieth-Century Germany.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in History 420. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines German history from the collapse of the Wilhelmine Empire in World War One to the 1990 unification of East and West Germany. We focus on three areas. First, we examine the institutions and state organization of constitutional monarchy, republic, Nazi dictatorship, the West German capitalist republic, and the East German state socialist republic. Second, we examine changes in society and economy. Finally, we examine intellectual and cultural trends: rejection of the Republic, Nazi culture, and attempts to come to terms with Nazism in East and West Germany. There are no formal prerequisites, but some knowledge of European history is assumed. Assignment: midterm, final, and a substantial term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3


History 429. Discovery.

Section 001 The History, Art, and Cinema of Discovery and Exploration

Instructor(s): Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

ARTS

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is suitable for first-year students. Travel, and a fascination for exploration, have been important determinants of European and American culture. This course explores the history of travel, discovery, and exploration through original accounts by travelers and explorers, through artistic depictions of travel, and through a series of movies about exploration and by explorers (some examples are Grass, King Kong, Kamet Conquered, Destination Moon). The primary concern of our work will be the impact of travel, discovery, and exploration on the travelers themselves. We begin with the age of Marco Polo, move to the "New World," visit the North and South Poles, climb the highest mountains, and end with real and imagined space travel. Grades will be based on class participation, performance on a regular quiz, and the final examination.

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History 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a lecture course which surveys the history of the modern Balkans the area which consists of the ex-Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania from roughly 1878 to the present. There are no prerequisites nor required background. Interested first-year students should feel welcome. Grading is based on: one hour exam, a one-hour written exam, writing on one essay question out of about four, one course paper (approximately 15 pages, topic according to student interest but cleared with instructor), and a written final exam (two essay questions to be chosen from a list of about eight questions). Major issues to be covered are: the crisis of 1875-78 with international involvement ending with the Treaty of Berlin, Croatia and Bosnia under the Habsburgs, the development of Bulgaria after 1878, the Macedonia problem, terrorist societies, World War I, the formation of Yugoslavia, nationality problems in Yugoslavia between the Wars, German penetration and the rise of dictatorships in the inter-war Balkans, World War II with Yugoslav and Greek resistance movements (including the Greek Civil War), Tito's Yugoslavia, its 1948 break with the USSR and Yugoslavia's special path to socialism. Nationality problems, the break-up of Yugoslavia, and the ensuing wars.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4


History 432. Russia to Peter the Great.

Instructor(s): Valerie Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since medieval times, Westerners have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the end of the seventeenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, and the reign of Ivan the Terrible. The course emphasizes interpretive issues, historiographic debates and questions of historical method. Class sessions will combine lecture and discussion. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two short papers (5-7 pages), a midterm and a final exam. There are no prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4


History 434. History of the Soviet Union.

Instructor(s): Jochen Hellbeck

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of fifteen independent republics, the experience of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe is being rethought as if the seeds of destruction had been planted already in the revolution. This course looks at the complex evolution of political structures, social developments, and cultural responses during the 70 years of the Soviet system. Beginning with the prerevolutionary crises and political movements, it surveys the rise of Stalin, the building of a "totalitarian" state, and the successive reforms that ultimately unraveled the system. Students are required to attend two lectures and one discussion section each week, prepare a term project, and take two take-home examinations (midterm and final).

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History 441/AAPTIS 470. The Islamic West: al-Andalus and the Magrib, 600-1500.

Instructor(s): Michael Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 442. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/cmenas/aptis470.html

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 470.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 443/AAPTIS 487. Modern Middle East History.

Instructor(s): Juan Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/443syl99.htm

This lecture course surveys the emergence of the modern Middle East from the three great Muslim empires of the early modern period, the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal. It discusses both indigenous developments and the Western impact in the nineteenth century, looking at reform bureaucracy and millenarian movements as responses to these changes. We then examine the rise of nationalism and the break-up of the Ottoman Empire during and after WW I, and these phenomena are seen as the context for the beginnings of the Palestine issue. Attention is paid to the interwar efforts at building strong states in the region, whether in the Turkey of Ataturk, the Iran of Reza Shah, or Wafdist Egypt. The last part of the course looks at the rise of socialist and pan-Arab ideologies, as well as of opposing ideologies such as Islamic activism after WW II. The impact of petroleum, the Palestinian issue, the turn toward bourgeois liberalism, and Shi'ite movements such as the Iranian Revolution and the Hizbullah phenomenon in Lebanon, and the Gulf War of 1991, will all be addressed in this section. Students will take a midterm and a final examination, and will write a ten-page term paper on a subject of their choosing. Reading in this class comes to about 150 pages per week.

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History 448/CAAS 448. Africa Since 1850.

Section 001 Colonialism, Nationalism, Cosmopolitanism

Instructor(s): Timothy Scarnecchia (tscarne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

Upper-Level Writing R&ETheme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tscarne/44899syl.htm

Investigates the transformation of European imperialism into formal colonialism; diverse forms of colonial states and societies; diverse African responses to colonialism; the development of nationalist movements along spiritual, economic, and political, lines; and the post-colonial state and society. The course offers a historical basis for understanding the transnational political economy of Africa today, the process of democratization, and the increasingly cosmopolitan nature of African political and cultural trends.

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History 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The major theme of this course is "emancipation" of Southeast Asia, a historical confrontation between the societies of the region and the imagined global community of "developed" nations. Geographic coverage will include the principal countries of the mainland (Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos) and the island world (Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, and the Philippines). Lectures and reading assume no prior knowledge of the region. There will be a midterm, a final, and a term paper. (Mrazek)

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History 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

Instructor(s): Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 4


History 467. The United States Since 1933.

Instructor(s): Sidney Fine (sidneyf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course provides a comprehensive view of American history and of life in America from the Great Depression to the present day. Among the subjects treated are the New Deal; World War II; the Cold War; McCarthy and McCarthyism; the Fair Deal; the New Frontier; the Great Society; the turbulence of the 1960's (the Black revolt and Black power, the counterculture and youth revolt, the new feminism and women's liberation); the war in Vietnam; Nixon and the Watergate affair; the 1980s and the Reagan presidency; and the presidencies of Bush and Clinton. Several paperbacks are assigned for the course, but no textbook is used. There is a midterm and a final examination in the course, and a paper is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4


History 477. Latin America: The National Period.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century until the present. The approach is chronological and thematic. A temporal narrative will be organized around these themes: (1) state formation, including forms of political rule and the construction of collective identities at local, national, and continental levels; (2) elite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolution, and state repression; and (3) forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic development, and center-periphery linkages. The discussion of individual countries and of specific topics will be intertwined throughout the course. Classes will combine lecture and discussions. Students are required to read the assigned materials BEFORE each class and are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Written work will involve a short essay, a longer paper, a midterm, and a final. Readings will include relevant sections from a textbook, and articles, monographs, novels, short stories, newspapers and films, some of which will be selected in response to class discussion and students' interests.

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History 479. The Russian Orthodox Church: History, Culture, Politics, 988-Present.

Instructor(s): Valerie Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Traces the history of the Orthodox Church in Russia, from its origins in the ninth century through its current controversial resurgence in post-Soviet Russia. Considers Russian Orthodox Christianity as a particularly Russian variant on the alternate Greek and Western models of Christianity, and explores the ways in which this unique belief system shaped and was shaped by events in Russian history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4


History 531/AAPTIS 587. Studies in Pahlavi and Middle Persian.

Instructor(s): Gernot Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 587.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 550. Imperial China: Ideas, Men, and Society.

Section 001 Meets with Medieval and Renaissance Collegium 411.001

Instructor(s): Chung-shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

ARTS

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a systematic analysis of state, society, people, and ideas in Imperial China from 221 B.C. to the end of the 18th century. Each dynasty or period is examined by its characteristic development and unique features. The following topics are to be covered: (1) the concept and structure of empire; (2) emperors and political culture; (3) great thinkers, influential political leaders, and powerful rebels; (4) wars and foreigners; (5) Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism; (6) class, gender, and race; (7) writers, literature, and the structure of feeling; (8) science and technology; and (9) eating culture, art of entertainment, and daily life. Special features of the course include reading of Classical Chinese poetry, singing of Peking opera, and discussion of the Scientific Revolution and the birth of "Modern China" in the 17th century. The course is open to all undergraduates and graduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1


History 552. Topics in the Early Modern History of Mainland Southeast Asia.

Section 001 Mainland Southeast Asia C. 1400-1850

Instructor(s): Victor Lieberman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the political, economic, and cultural history of mainland Southeast Asia during the so-called early modern period, c. 1400-1850. The geographic focus is on the core areas of present-day Burma (Mynmar), Thailand, and Vietnam, but Cambodia, Laos and the lesser known peripheries of the major state systems will also receive attention. A basic goal is to discover what commonalities the mainland shared, in terms of underlying cultural structures and patterns of historic change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3


History 569/LHC 412 (Business Administration). American Business History.

Instructor(s): David Lewis

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://lib.bus.umich.edu/search/r?SEARCH=LHC+412

A study of the origins, development, and growth of business. The course traces the beginnings of business enterprise in Europe and describes business activities during the American colonial, revolutionary, and pre-Civil War periods. It then discusses economic aspects of the Civil War, post-Civil War industrial growth, business consolidation and the anti-trust movement, economic aspects of World War I, business conditions during the 1920s, effects of the 1929 depression and the New Deal upon business, economic aspects of World War II, and a multitude of recent business developments and trends.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1


History 569/LHC 412 (Business Administration). American Business History.

Instructor(s): E Guthey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://lib.bus.umich.edu/search/r?SEARCH=LHC+412

A study of the origins, development, and growth of business. The course traces the beginnings of business enterprise in Europe and describes business activities during the American colonial, revolutionary, and pre-Civil War periods. It then discusses economic aspects of the Civil War, post-Civil War industrial growth, business consolidation and the anti-trust movement, economic aspects of World War I, business conditions during the 1920s, effects of the 1929 depression and the New Deal upon business, economic aspects of World War II, and a multitude of recent business developments and trends.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1


History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 001 Illiberalism: Cultures of Fascism in the 20th Century

Instructor(s): Tom Wolfe (tcwolfe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the phenomenon of opposition to the liberal organization of political, economic, and social life in the 20th century. We shall establish a background for our study by first building a sense of the meaning of liberalism, and then by studying the discourses of 19th century romanticism and nationalism. We shall then turn to the formation of fascist ideologies in the 1920s and 30s, and will conclude by mapping out several post-WWII "illiberal" movements. Our goal is to understand both the power of liberalism as well as the nature of the claims made against it from the right in the 20th century. Instruction will be in discussion format; at least one prior course in European history is highly recommended. Evaluation will be based on three short papers of 5-7 pages and one longer paper of 10-15 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 002 Jews and Christians in Early Modern Italy. Meets with Medieval and Renaissance Collegium 425.001

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (Siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W99/HS591/index.html

Renaissance Italy and the Counter-Reformation. Neoplatonism and Christian Hebraism; a drive to convert the Jews or to "replace" them; Inquisition against Lutheran Christian heresies and against Marranos: the history of Jewish-Christian relations and interactions in Italy. 1400-1700 is a fascinating and developing field of historical research. In this course we will read both primary and secondary sources including provocative art-historical analysis of images and symbols in Renaissance Christian art by University of Michigan historian Diane Owen Hughes and art historian Stephen Campbell. We will read classics in the history of Christians and of Jews in Renaissance and Reformation Italy Carlo Ginzburg, H. Jedin, Brian Pullan, Robert Bonfil, Ariel Toaff. Final projects may draw on an array of Italian sources available in translation or in the original: plays, letters, treatises, autobiographies, art, sermons, inquisitorial proceedings, etc. This is a seminar-style course for upper level undergraduates and for graduate students interested in History, Religion, Art History, and Literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 592. Topics in Asian History.

Section 001 Women and Children in Late Imperial China: Social, Cultural, and Medical Perspectives. Meets with History 392.002 and Womenís Studies 483.007

Instructor(s): Hsiung

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 392.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 593. Topics in U.S. History.

Section 001 Pragmatism, Jazz, and American Culture. Meets with American Culture 496.002

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 496.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


History 595/CAAS 595. Topics in African History.

Section 001 African Nationalist and Millennial Politics

Instructor(s): Timothy Scarnecchia (tscarne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tscarne/mnpsyl99.htm

Begins with the development of a Pan-African genealogy of African nationalist political thought, showing African-American and Afro-Caribbean influences. Specific case studies are undertaken to examine the demands and conflicts created when nationalist leaders became heads of state. The parallel development of millennial spiritual and prophet movements in 20th-century Africa will then be explored, showing the inter-related elements of mass religion and politics found in many histories of Sub-Saharan Africa. Case studies of millennial religious and political movements will be undertaken, and students are encouraged to draw comparisons with similar historical movements in the African Diaspora. For upper-level undergraduates with previous course work on African topics and graduate students interested in African or comparative topics. Graduate students will be expected to write two research papers. Undergraduates will write one research paper in addition to a midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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