Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in History of Art (Division 392)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for History of Art.


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


Hist. Art 102. Western Art from the End of the Middle Ages to the Present.

Section 001, 002 Introduction to Visual Culture in the West, 1300-1997

Instructor(s): Stephen Campbell , Howard Lay

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed 104 and 105, or 150. Two credits granted to those who have completed one of 104 or 105. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/102-001.html

Works of art have distinct histories which have long been described in terms of concepts such as style, taste, and tradition. But they also participate in vital ways in a series of other histories of religion, of the state and its institutions, of public and private life. A work of art not only exemplifies valued artistic skills, but serves to visualize systems of belief, reinforcing or challenging a society's ideas on life and death, power and authority, social experience and sexual identity. As the essential introduction to visual culture from the Renaissance to the present, this course has three principal objectives: first, to familiarize students with the wide range of images constituting the canonical core from Giotto to Pollock of Western painting, sculpture, and graphic arts; second, to engage diverse methodological positions with which to interpret these images; and finally, to outline the historiography of art history as a means of exposing students to the challenges of critical analysis in the arts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

Hist. Art 103. Arts of Asia.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/103-001.html

This course will take a topical approach to the arts of India, China, and Japan rather than attempt a broad survey. Lectures typically focus on one or two monuments as case studies so as to treat them in greater depth; images from these case studies will be available for inspection on the web. The course is divided into 6 topic areas: Paradise; Personal Conflict; Naturalism; Naturalness; Popular Art; and East/West interchange, 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Across these topic areas we will consider a variety of different media, including painting, sculpture, bas relief, lacquer, ceramics, calligraphy, prints, garden design and architecture. Case studies will highlight specific genres such as narrative painting, devotional sculpture, funerary art, landscape, and popular subjects. Because case studies from two or more traditions will be examined within each topic area, there will be ample opportunity for exploring the basics of comparative art history. Apart from section participation, course work will include two short papers and a final examination. The course presumes no previous exposure to the arts of Asia. All are welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 113/Art 113. Introduction to the Visual Arts.

Instructor(s): Chris Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: This course is for non-art majors only. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/113-001.html

Visual arts are a part of the human experience in all cultures and all time periods. The ability to appreciate, to understand, and to assess the quality of visual art can enrich a person's life and broaden one's thinking. This course will introduce students having no formal art or art historical background to the major forms of visual expression through human history from the Stone Age to the present. We will examine works of art in various media such as painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture, architecture, graphics, and industrial design. Students will learn how artists use the language of form to communicate information, to express emotion, to explore the world of nature and the world of the mind. Students will learn the basic techniques of the various media. Students will learn how the art of a time and place defines and expands the boundaries of that culture. Assigned readings and visits to museums and galleries will help students become critical consumers of the visual culture as they learn to see, appreciate, and assess art forms. Requirements include periodic quizzes, a final exam, and a term paper. Students will also make some ungraded drawings and paintings as analytical tools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 151. Art and Ideas East and West.

Section 001 Art:Ideas::East:West

Instructor(s): Walter Spink

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/151-001.html

In this course, a comparative study is made of eastern and western cultural forms, ideas and values as these are reflected in examples of painting, sculpture, and architecture as well as in poetry, music, and other forms of creative expression. This course also compares western and eastern attitudes toward significant cultural themes such as time, nature, death, God, love, and action.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 Rome: From the Babylonian Captivity to the Age of Galileo

Instructor(s): Stephen Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/194-001.html

Following the collapse of the Roman Empire, the subsequent fortunes of its capital city despite recurrent political and social upheaval were interpreted in terms of prophetic myth and a sense of historical destiny. This course picks up the story of Rome during the crisis-ridden period of its temporary abandonment by the Papacy during the fourteenth century, and will investigate subsequent "moments" of its transformation into a cosmopolitan Renaissance and Baroque city with multiple, overlapping identities: the spiritual destination of pilgrims and tourists, the seat of a priest/monarch claiming universal dominion, the ruinous symbol of past and present decadence and its castigation, and, above all, the "theater of the world" where a cultural and ethnic heterogeneity unparalleled in any other European urban center was permanently on display. We will primarily be focusing on one hand on monumental works of art and schemes of urbanization which propagate the myth of Rome's eternity and portentous destiny, and on the other on the lived experience of urban life primarily as it was witnessed and described by visitors and outsiders. Classes will be organized around particular historical episodes, individual experiences, or monumental works, e.g.,: cult images and processions, the Sistine Chapel, the visit of Marten van Heemskerck, the Sack of 1527, the rebuilding of St. Peter's, Caravaggio and his patrons, the trial of Galileo.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 002 Signs and Symbols in the Lands of the Bible

Instructor(s): Beth Dusinberre

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/194-002.html

Why do people use signs and symbols? How does a symbol take on particular meaning? Why can certain works or objects evoke a range of ideas in our minds? Is the use of symbolic representation particularly important in such areas as religion and magic? Where else do we see it? What is the potential for the same symbols to be used for different specific messages in different contexts? This seminar will explore signs and symbols in the lands of the Bible, the ancient Near East and Egypt, from prehistoric into Christian times. We will concentrate on artistic symbols, working with objects in the Kelsey Museum as well as with illustrations in books.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 212/Architecture 212. Understanding Architecture.

Instructor(s): Kent Kleinman (Kleinman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to students enrolled in Architecture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/212-001.html

This three-credit course is the principal introductory survey course in architecture. Using historical and contemporary examples, it examines the architect's role in society and the role of architecture and urban design in shaping the built environment. Upon completion of the course the student is expected to be able (1) to identify and distinguish buildings constructed in different times, places, and societies; (2) to discuss how architecture is and has been viewed and interpreted by various individuals and cultures; (3) to analyze urban forms and spaces in relation to the buildings which make them up and the people who use them; and (4) to develop and describe a personal attitude toward an understanding of the man-made environment. The format consists of two one-hour lectures per week. Several design-related exercises requiring the student to experience, analyze, interpret, and report on aspects of the built environment will be required. The course is enhanced by weekly recitation sections, which focus on improving the student's ability to venture into and sustain architectural discourse.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 222/Class. Arch. 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology.

Instructor(s): Elaine Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/222-001.html

The disastrous eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79 that buried Pompeii, bloody gladiatorial fights in the Colosseum, gluttonous diners, ruthless women plotting against their husbands and sons. The popular imagination about ancient Rome and its empire is largely shaped by ancient reports of such sensational goings on, and Hollywood and television have done much to supply us with vivid, if often inaccurate, images of them. But what were the Romans really like? How did they live from day to day in towns like Pompeii? What did they really think of gladiators? Why was the social ritual of dining so important to the Romans? And what did Roman women do all day? To address these and many other questions about the Romans and their culture, this course looks to the archaeological record of Roman civilization art, architecture, items of daily use to illuminate the literary reports. Lectures will introduce the main themes and material of the course on archaeological materials in the Kelsey Museum and the variety of methods used today to retrieve, study, and understand them. There will be a one-hour midterm exam, two written assignments based on museum artifacts, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2/3 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 230/Amer. Cult. 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/230-001.html

This course asks what the study of art history and American history can tell us about each other through a survey of art, architecture, and material culture produced during the nineteenth century. This complex period saw the transformation of the United States from a rural to an industrial, urban nation; a Civil War that divided the country, Westward expansion that enlarged it, and waves of immigration and border movement that changed its population; the rise of a middle class, and the emergence of women into public and professional life. American artists and architects sought to rival their European contemporaries and eventually produced distinctive works that responded to national trends.Through lectures, discussion, and visits to see original works of art in museums and libraries, along with readings in primary-source documents and recent critical interpretations, we will examine both developments in the fine arts and the impact of historical change on the material and popular culture of everyday life in America. Among the topics to be investigated are: the role of art in creating an image of America as "nature's nation"; machine-made art and machines as art; the West as viewed from the painter's easel, the photographer's lens, and the frontier homestead; the interaction of Native American artists, Anglo settlers, and the tourist trade; the creation of Civil War monuments; parlors and the ideology of the Victorian home; mass-produced images and the dissemination of art for middle-class taste; the brooding psychology in the Gilded-Age paintings of Eakins, Homer, and Cassatt.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 272. Arts of the Twentieth Century.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Paice

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/272-001.html

In this course we will explore, more or less chronologically, the work of major 20th-century European and American artists. Two fundamental issues will dominate the survey. The first concerns the way in which avant-garde artists, beginning with Picasso's influential attack on traditional conventions in Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), have repeatedly, in their artistic practice over the course of the past ninety years, interrogated the nature of signification itself (in other words, how form produces meaning). Relatedly, the second issue that we will consider is the avant-garde's ambitious but theoretically highly controversial relationship to revolutionary politics. The course is designed so as to help you develop the vocabulary, the analytical and visual tools, that are necessary in order to come to grips with the great diversity of works and critical debates that constitute the history of 20th-century art. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and sections, midterm and final exams (both in-class), and two 5-8 page papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 344/MARC 344. Early Medieval Kingdoms and Cultures: European Art 400-1000.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sears

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/344-001.html

This lecture course concerns a fascinating period in European history, when, after the fall of Rome, waves of invading "barbarians" occupied the lands of the former empire and, as a product of dynamic interchange between cultures, new forms of art and architecture emerged. We will focus our attention on places and times in which distinctive cultures flourished: Britain in the "age of the saints," Ostrogothic and Lombard Italy, Visigothic Spain before and after the coming of Islam, Carolingian Europe under Charlemagne and his heirs, Anglo-Saxon England, Mozarabic Spain, and Ottonian Germany. We will consider the function of imagery in specific historical contexts, studying magnificently decorated churches and palaces, elaborately embellished manuscripts, and sumptuous objects produced for patrons with a taste for gold, ivory, and gemstones. Overarching themes include early medieval attitudes toward the classical past, European perceptions of Byzantium and Islam, the political use of imagery in early medieval courts, the cult of relics, art in liturgy, and theories of the religious image.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 393. Junior Proseminar.

Section 001 Neo-Impressionism

Instructor(s): Howard Lay

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in history of art. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/393-001.html

This course examines in considerable detail the short life (roughly from 1884-1891) of Neo-Impressionist painting in Paris. The central figure of our study is Georges Seurat, whose invention and promotion of a presumably "scientific" form of painting will lead us to consider relations between modernism and mass culture, between the avant-garde and "official" culture, between "unique" works of art and the cult of technology, and finally between the famous pronouncements of modernist criticism and various theories of style and narrative that modernist criticism may well have overlooked.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 001 Science, Art and Spirituality

Instructor(s): Diane Kirkpatrick (dianek@umich.edu), Michael Kapetan (nbva@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/394-001.html

This course will explore how artists interweave elements of science and art to express the spiritual dimension in human life that connected with what Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary describes as "an animating or vital principle held to give to physical organisms" and also "the activating or essential principle influencing a person." These interrelationships have assumed increased importance for many creative people as we approach the end of the second millennium in a world shaped by rapidly changing technologies, shifting political powers, and expanded awareness of diverse cultures. Although the course will center on a cross-section of contemporary artists within the context of earlier art that links science, art, and spirituality in various cultures, our readings and discussion will include materials written from the perspective of the scientist, the spiritual researcher, and the artist. Readings and class materials will be enriched by video clips and by selected visitors. The teaching team pairs art historian Diane Kirkpatrick (whose research has centered on artists whose work expresses something of the complexity and wholeness of life by adapting new technologies to artistic ends) and sculptor Michael Kapetan (whose own works in both figurative and abstract modes all combine elements of science, art, and the spiritual).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 Mimi-Vue

Instructor(s): Diane Kirkpatrick (dianek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/394-003.html

Students in this course will participate in MIMI-VUE (Michigan Millennium Values of/for a University Education), a three-year collaborative project that is teaming undergraduate researchers in partnership with many elements of the university community to create a portrait of this institution and the values it will carry into the 21st century. Course work will involve required reading on the history of the university, participation in group discussion and planning sessions, and working in one or more of the research activities of the project (team-interviews with current and former members of the University community concerning their experiences at Michigan, researching MIMI-VUE themes at the Bentley Historical Library, and helping plan the "Millennial Web Days," which will electronically unite the U-M community around the world on December 31, 1999 and January 1, 2000). Initial class sessions will discuss the reading and prepare students for each activity. Thereafter, students will work individually or in teams. Grades will be based on quality of group participation and project work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 004 Narrative in the Ancient World: The Art of Storytelling. Meets with RC Humanities 333.001

Instructor(s): Beth Dusinberre

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/394-004.html

See RC Humanities 333.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 396. Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 393. Open to students admitted to Honors in History of Art. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Hist. Art 403/NR&E 403. History of Western Landscape Architecture.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/403-001.html

The intent of this course is to survey the human management and design of open space throughout history. The discussions will focus on gardens, urban open spaces, and regional and environmental planning. Prototypes will be viewed and analyzed not only within the cultural context of their own time and place, but also in terms of the influence each has had in shaping 20th-century perceptions of the landscape. The course will also introduce students to specific areas of knowledge and expertise which currently comprise the practice of landscape architecture. The potential roles landscape architects will play in shaping and managing the environment in the future will be discussed. The course will consist of slide-illustrated lectures by the instructor and guest lecturers. There will be no regularly scheduled discussion section. Questions are welcome and encouraged during the lecture. In addition to taking a midterm and a final exam, there will be a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 420/Amer. Cult. 432. National Identity in American Art.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any prior coursework in history of art, American culture, or American history. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/420-001.html

This lecture/discussion course will reconsider the old question of "What's American About American Art?" by asking "when and why have people cared what's American about American art?" We will focus on a series of artistic moments form Colonial portraiture to the reception of Abstract Expressionism during the Cold War which artists, critics, historians, or their public have claimed were uniquely American or expressed a unified national culture. By studying related issues in political, social, and cultural history (which often reveal a nation that was anything but unified), we will examine how Americans have sought to define a national identity through art. Students who have done prior work in any aspect of art history, American history, American literature, or American culture and who are willing to do some background reading to fill in the gaps in their knowledge are encouraged to participate. The class will include at least one field trip to view original works of art and architecture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 436/Class. Arch. 436. Hellenistic and Roman Architecture.

Instructor(s): Yannis Lolos (ylolos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 101 or 221 or 222. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/436-001.html

See Classical Archaeology 436.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 443/Class. Arch. 443. The Art and Archaeology of Greek Colonization.

Instructor(s): John Pedley

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 221. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/443-001.html

See Classical Archaeology 443.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 463. Varieties of Dutch and Flemish Painting.

Section 001 Dutch Pictorial Art and Visual Culture

Instructor(s): T Willette

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 102 and 260. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/463-001.html

This course deals with the pictorial art and visual culture of the Netherlands during the seventeenth century. We will be looking primarily at painting, but also at drawings and prints, to examine the diversity and types of images produced, and to situate them within their historical and cultural circumstances. The course will give special emphasis to the illusionistic and descriptive artistry for which Dutch and Flemish artists were justly famous. It will explore the character and meanings of this art's celebrated naturalism, and will consider the social, political, and ideological functions of pictures, the status of art and artists, and the conditions of artistic production and consumption in the Dutch Republic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 471. Investigations of Recent Art.

Section 001 Representations of the Holocaust. Meets with Comparative Literature 422.001

Instructor(s): Ernst Van Alphen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 272. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/471-001.html

This course examines how the opposition between historical and imaginative discourse has determined not only the discussions in Holocaust studies, but also the kind of art, literature, and historiography which has been produced about the Holocaust. Artists, writers, and theorists who refuse the opposition by deconstructing it will be focused on, e.g., Christian Boltanski, Anselm Kiefer, Armando, Art Spiegelman, Charlotte Salomon, Charlotte Delbo, Helen Demidenko, Paul Celan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 487/Chinese 475/Asian Studies 475/RC Hums. 475/Phil. 475. The Arts and Letters of China.

Instructor(s): Yi-Tsi Feuerwerker (ymfeuer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/487-001.html

See Chinese 475.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 525. Graphic Arts from 1660 to the Present.

Section 001 Students Must Reserve Fridays from 12-6 P.M. To Accommodate Trips To Various Museum Collections

Instructor(s): Walter Spink

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 102 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/525-001.html

This course, designed primarily for graduate students in the History of Art department and the Art School, will deal with developments in the last few centuries, emphasizing connoisseurship as much as history. In this class students will (1) examine prints with museum curators, dealers, and collectors; (2) be shown the fundamentals of lithography, etching, and other processes; and (3) be introduced to the problems and techniques of conservation, and to aspects of collecting. Assignments will consist of readings, short papers and reports on prints in nearby collections. Because so much work will be done with actual prints, the enrollment will be limited.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 590. Special Topics Japanese Art.

Section 001 Woodblock Prints

Instructor(s): Jonathan Reynolds (jmreyno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 391. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/590-001.html

The class will examine wood block prints from the late 17th through the mid-19th centuries and their relationship to literature and popular culture. Topics will include the following interrelated topics: life in the "pleasure quarter" as depicted in prints, Kabuki theatre, the representation of sexuality and gender, censorship, and the parody of both contemporary life and literary and artistic traditions. The class will draw on recent scholarship on prints, on the literature of the period such as novels of Saikaku, and on writings on cultural studies. Two class presentations and a research paper required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 11:29 AM on Fri, Feb 5, 1999.