Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Japanese (Division 401)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Japanese.


Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

Students wanting to begin language study, at a level other than first year, must take a placement exam to be held on Tuesday, January 5, 1-3 p.m.

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Japanese 102. Beginning Japanese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Shoko Emori (semori@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 101. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/J10x/10x.html

This course is designed for students who have less than the equivalent of one year's study of Japanese at the University of Michigan. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as becoming familiar with aspects of Japanese culture which are necessary for language competency. Recitation sessions are conducted in Japanese emphasizing speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speeds. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist. Students are required to do assignments with audio tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). It is expected that, by the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar, reading and writing skills in Hiragana and Katakana, and will be able to recognize and produce approximately 140 Kanji in context. Texts: Situational Functional Japanese, Vol. 1-2.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 202. Second-Year Japanese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Misao Kozuka (misakozu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 201. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/J20x/20x.html

Further training is given in all the language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for students who have acquired a basic language proficiency. The aim of the oral component is to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in more advanced practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. In the reading and writing component, the emphasis is on reading elementary texts, developing an expository style, and writing short answers/essays in response to questions about these texts. Approximately 400 of the essential characters are covered. Discussions on the social and cultural use of language are provided. Students are required to attend five hours of class per week: two hours of lecture and three hours of recitation. Students are also required to practice a minimum of two hours for each class hour (12 hours per week). Recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures. Texts: Situational Functional Japanese, Vol. 2-3.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 375/Asian Studies 375. Japanese Popular Music.

Language Courses

Section 001 From Bushi to Boredoms

Instructor(s): Hugh de Ferranti (hbd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will deal with both historical and contemporary forms of popular music in Japan. Amateur and professional music-making and various kinds of discourse about music (in translation) will be treated as resources for thinking about the culture of the populace and ways in which it has been distinct from the "high" culture of Japan's elites. Using theoretical frameworks appropriate for the study of Japanese performance culture, we will first study the texts, music styles, and performance contexts of popular music and dance genres from several periods of Japanese history prior to the modern era. We will then consider representative forms of twentieth-century popular music, such as naniwa-bushi, enka, kayôkyoku, kurashikku (popular "classical" music), idol pop, karaoke singing, Japanese jazz, rock, punk, and rap. Issues that will be addressed in relation to these examples include: identification of historically-specific characteristics and culturally-based continuities; musicians' deployment of indigenous and non-indigenous musical traits; the nature of the music world and the musical profession in Japanese society; the socio-historical evidence of song lyrics and performance styles; and the recording industry and its role in the production of "mainstream" and "marginal" music styles and sub-cultures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 392. Honors Course in Japanese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

No Description Provided.

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Japanese 394. Honors Course in Japanese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

No Description Provided.

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Japanese 399. Directed Reading.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

No Description Provided.

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Japanese 402/Asian Studies 402. Japanese Literature in Translation: Edo and Modern Periods.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001 Japanese Literature and Thought in Translation: Nationalism/Sexuality/Ethnicity

Instructor(s): Mark Driscoll (markwd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine Japanese literary and philosophical texts in their historical contexts, focusing on the three periods of early-modern (1650-1780), modern (1910-1940), and post-modern (1980-present). In the early-modern period we will read selected works from theater and comedy, analyze Motoori Norinaga's theory of poetics and language, and look at Ogyu Sorai's philosophy of neo-Confucianism. In the modern period, against the background of Japan's imperialism in Asia, we will concentrate on texts that explore subjectivity, ethnicity, and sexuality. Beginning with an introduction to the theory of subjectivity in the modern philosophy of Nishida Kitaro and Tanabe Hajime, this section will focus on the expanding mass culture in Tokyo through the fictions of Edogawa Rampo and Tanizaki Jun'ichirô. We will also look briefly at the debate in the founding of Japanese anthropology between the nativism of Yanagita Kunio and the universalism and Asianism of Minakata Kumagusu. In the post-modernism section we will look at women's fiction (Yamada Amie, Yoshimoto), television anime, and discussions of Korean-Japanese ethnicity (Kan San'jun) against the background of Japan's capitalist expansion. No knowledge of Japanese is required. Contemporary work in feminism, queer theory, and post-colonial discourse will be integrated into class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 406. Third-Year Japanese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Takahiko Hayashi (thayashi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 405. (5). (Excl).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/J3rd/406.html

Advanced training is given in all the language skills. Practice in the use of spoken Japanese is contextualized within simulated Japanese social settings. A variety of selected modern texts (essays, fiction, and newspapers) are read with emphasis on expository style. The goal is to produce self-sufficient readers who can read and discuss most texts with the aid of a dictionary. Students are required to practice with audio/visual tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures. Texts: An Integrated Approach to Intermediate Japanese.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 417. Communicative Competence for Japan-Oriented Careers II.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Yasuhiro Omoto (yomoto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406, 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course stresses the effective use of the Japanese spoken language in contexts likely to be encountered by a career-oriented professional in Japan. Winter Term topics include: Banking, Import and Export, The Japanese Market, Annual Reports, Business Ritual and Socializing. In addition, the course will include practice in rapid reading and transcription/dictation of moderately difficult texts, newspaper articles, and news broadcasts. Students are expected to practice with audio tapes for a minimum of two hours for each class hour.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 461. Social Science Readings in Japanese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Shoko Emori (semori@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/J4th_soc/461index.html

This course helps students to develop reading skills necessary to conduct research in Japanese social science topics. Readings are assigned from newspapers, books, and journals in a variety of fields. The emphasis is on the acquisition of "kango" vocabulary which arise in understanding these readings. Homework includes a minimum of two hours of preparation per class hour. Students are expected to review for the readings and for frequent quizzes so that they can participate actively in discussion in Japanese in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 490. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics.

Language Courses

Section 001 Syntax & Semantics
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 202. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for both undergraduate (prerequisite required) and graduate students who are interested in acquiring the specifics of Japanese grammar. It is also recommended for anyone considering a career as a teacher of Japanese. The goals of the course are: to gain knowledge of the basic characteristics of sentence structure and meaning in Japanese; to become familiar with selected theoretical analyses (or competing analyses) which linguists have proposed for various structural patterns in Japanese; and to develop a repertoire of linguistic vocabulary with which to talk about sentence structure and meaning in Japanese.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 557. Seminar in Japanese Image Culture.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Instructor(s): Mark Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the critical approaches taken to Japanese cinema from the Taisho era to the present, with emphasis on post-structuralist theory and cultural studies. It pays particular attention to the relationship of cinema to literature at a variety of levels, from adaption to the participation of literary figures in film making and criticism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

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