Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Mathematics (Division 428)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Mathematics.


Elementary Mathematics Courses. In order to accommodate diverse backgrounds and interests, several course options are available to beginning mathematics students. All courses require three years of high school mathematics; four years are strongly recommended and more information is given for some individual courses below. Students with College Board Advanced Placement credit and anyone planning to enroll in an upper-level class should consider one of the Honors sequences and discuss the options with a mathematics advisor.

Students who need additional preparation for calculus are tentatively identified by a combination of the math placement test (given during orientation), college admissions test scores (SAT or ACT), and high school grade point average. Academic advisors will discuss this placement information with each student and refer students to a special mathematics advisor when necessary.

Two courses preparatory to the calculus, Math 105 and Math 110, are offered. Math 105 is a course on data analysis, functions and graphs with an emphasis on problem solving. Math 110 is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab and directed towards students who are unable to complete a first calculus course successfully. A maximum total of 4 credits may be earned in courses numbered 110 and below. Math 103 is offered exclusively in the Summer half-term for students in the Summer Bridge Program.

Math 127 and 128 are courses containing selected topics from geometry and number theory, respectively. They are intended for students who want exposure to mathematical culture and thinking through a single course. They are neither prerequisite nor preparation for any further course. No credit will be received for the election of Math 127 or 128 if a student already has received credit for a 200- (or higher) level mathematics course.

Each of Math 115, 185, and 295 is a first course in calculus and generally credit can be received for only one course from this list. The sequence 115-116-215 is appropriate for most students who want a complete introduction to calculus. One of Math 215, 285, or 395 is prerequisite to most more advanced courses in Mathematics.

The sequences 156-255-256, 175-176-285-286, 185-186-285-286, and 295-296-395-396 are Honors sequences. All students must have the permission of an Honors advisor to enroll in any of these courses, but they need not be enrolled in the LS&A Honors Program. All students with strong preparation and interest in mathematics are encouraged to consider these courses; they are both more interesting and more challenging than the standard sequences.

Math 185-285 covers much of the material of Math 115-215 with more attention to the theory in addition to applications. Most students who take Math 185 have taken a high school calculus course, but it is not required. Math 175-176 assumes a knowledge of calculus roughly equivalent to Math 115 and covers a substantial amount of so-called combinatorial mathematics (see course description) as well as calculus-related topics not usually part of the calculus sequence. Math 175 and 176 are taught by the discovery method: students are presented with a great variety of problems and encouraged to experiment in groups using computers. The sequence Math 295-396 provides a rigorous introduction to theoretical mathematics. Proofs are stressed over applications and these courses require a high level of interest and commitment. Most students electing Math 295 have completed a thorough high school calculus course. The student who completes Math 396 is prepared to explore the world of mathematics at the advanced undergraduate and graduate level.

Students with strong scores on either the AB or BC version of the College Board Advanced Placement exam may be granted credit and advanced placement in one of the sequences described above; a table explaining the possibilities is available from advisors and the Department. In addition, there are two courses expressly designed and recommended for students with one or two semesters of AP credit, Math 119 and Math 156. Both will review the basic concepts of calculus, cover integration and an introduction to differential equations, and introduce the student to the computer algebra system MAPLE. Math 119 will stress experimentation and computation, while Math 156 is an Honors course intended primarily for science and engineering concentrators and will emphasize both applications and theory. Interested students should consult a mathematics advisor for more details.

In rare circumstances and with permission of a Mathematics advisor reduced credit may be granted for Math 185 or 295 after Math 115. A list of these and other cases of reduced credit for courses with overlapping material is available from the Department. To avoid unexpected reduction in credit, students should always consult an advisor before switching from one sequence to another. In all cases a maximum total of 16 credits may be earned for calculus courses Math 115 through Math 396, and no credit can be earned for a prerequisite to a course taken after the course itself.

Students completing Math 116 who are principally interested in the application of mathematics to other fields may continue either to Math 215 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus III) or to Math 216 (Introduction to Differential Equations) these two courses may be taken in either order. Students who have greater interest in theory or who intend to take more advanced courses in mathematics should continue with Math 215 followed by the sequence Math 217-316 (Linear Algebra-Differential Equations). Math 217 (or the Honors version, Math 513) is required for a concentration in Mathematics; it both serves as a transition to the more theoretical material of advanced courses and provides the background required for optimal treatment of differential equations in Math 316. Math 216 is not intended for mathematics concentrators.

A maximum total of 4 credits may be earned in Mathematics courses numbered 110 and below. A maximum total of 16 credits may be earned for calculus courses Math 112 through Math 396, and no credit can be earned for a prerequisite to a course taken after the course itself.


Math. 105. Data, Functions, and Graphs.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with credit for Math. 103 can elect Math. 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. (4). (MSA). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Math 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who complete 105 are fully prepared for Math 115. This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. Math 110 is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

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Math. 110. Pre-Calculus (Self-Study).

Section 001 Students in Math 110 Recitation receive Individualized Self-Paced Instruction in the Mathematics Laboratory. Students Must Go to the Math Lab During the First Full Week of Classes
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: See Elementary Courses above. Enrollment in Math 110 is by recommendation of Math 115 instructor and override only. No credit granted to those who already have 4 credits for pre-calculus mathematics courses. (2). (Excl).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~meggin/math110.html

The course covers data analysis by means of functions and graphs. Math 110 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. The course is a condensed, half-term version of Math 105 (Math 105 covers the same material in a traditional classroom setting) designed for students who appear to be prepared to handle calculus but are not able to successfully complete Math 115. Students who complete 110 are fully prepared for Math 115. Students may enroll in Math 110 only on the recommendation of a mathematics instructor after the third week of classes in the Winter and must visit the Math Lab to complete paperwork and receive course materials.

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Math. 115. Calculus I.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Four years of high school mathematics. See Elementary Courses above. Credit usually is granted for only one course from among Math. 112, 115, 185, and 295. No credit granted to those who have completed Math. 175. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/courses/115/index.html

The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to concentrate in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam. The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing, and questioning skills.

Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. Math 185 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 includes some of the material of Math 115 together with some combinatorial mathematics. A student whose preparation is insufficient for Math 115 should take Math 105 (Data, Functions, and Graphs). Math 116 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking Math 186. The cost for this course is over $100 since the student will need a text (to be used for 115 and 116) and a graphing calculator (the Texas Instruments TI-83 is recommended).

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Math. 115. Calculus I.

Section 100 Students in Math 115.100 Recitation receive Individual Self-Paced Instruction in the Mathematics Laboratory, Students Must Go to the Math Lab During the First Full Week of Classes
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Four years of high school mathematics. See Elementary Courses above. Credit usually is granted for only one course from among Math. 112, 115, 185, and 295. No credit granted to those who have completed Math. 175. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

No Description Provided.

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Math. 115. Calculus I.

Section 170, 173 Section 170 and 173 only by Permission of CSP
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Four years of high school mathematics. See Elementary Courses above. Credit usually is granted for only one course from among Math. 112, 115, 185, and 295. No credit granted to those who have completed Math. 175. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

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Math. 116. Calculus II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 115. Credit is granted for only one course from among Math. 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, and 296. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Math 115 for a general description of the sequence Math 115-116-215.Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, infinite series. Math 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. Math 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking Math 285.

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Math. 127. Geometry and the Imagination.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school mathematics including a geometry course. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed a 200- (or higher) level mathematics course. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the ideas and some of the basic results in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. Beginning with geometry in ancient Greece, the course includes the construction of new geometric objects from old ones by projecting and by taking slices. The next topic is non-Euclidean geometry. This section begins with the independence of Euclid's Fifth Postulate and with the construction of spherical and hyperbolic geometries in which the Fifth Postulate fails; how spherical and hyperbolic geometry differs from Euclidean geometry. The last topic is geometry of higher dimensions: coordinatization the mathematician's tool for studying higher dimensions; construction of higher-dimensional analogues of some familiar objects like spheres and cubes; discussion of the proper higher-dimensional analogues of some geometric notions (length, angle, orthogonality, etc. This course is intended for students who want an introduction to mathematical ideas and culture. Emphasis on conceptual thinking students will do hands-on experimentation with geometric shapes, patterns, and ideas. Grades based on homework and a final project. No exams. Text: Beyond the Third Dimension (Thomas Banchoff, 1990).

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Math. 147. Introduction to Interest Theory.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 112 or 115. No credit granted to those who have completed a 200- (or higher) level mathematics course. (3). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for students who seek an introduction to the mathematical concepts and techniques employed by financial institutions such as banks, insurance companies, and pension funds. Actuarial students, and other mathematics concentrators, should elect Math 424 which covers the same topics but on a more rigorous basis requiring considerable use of calculus. Topics covered include: various rates of simple and compound interest, present and accumulated values based on these; annuity functions and their application to amortization, sinking funds and bond values; depreciation methods; introduction to life tables, life annuity, and life insurance values. This course is not part of a sequence. Students should possess financial calculators.

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Math. 176. Dynamical Systems and Calculus.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one course from among Math. 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, and 296. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The sequence Math 175-176 is a two-term introduction to Combinatorics, Dynamical Systems, and Calculus. The topics are integrated over the two terms, although the first term will stress combinatorics and the second term will stress the development of calculus in the context of dynamical systems. Students are expected to have some previous experience with the basic concepts and techniques of calculus. The course stresses discovery as a vehicle for learning. Students will be required to experiment throughout the course on a range of problems and will participate each term in a group project. UNIX workstations will be a valuable experimental tool in this course, and students will run preset lab routines on them using Matlab and MAPLE. The general theme of the course will be discrete-time and continuous-time dynamical systems. Examples of dynamical systems arising in the sciences are used as motivation. Topics include: iterates of functions, simple ordinary differential equations, fixed points, attracting and repelling fixed points and periodic orbits, ordered and chaotic motion, self-similarity, and fractals. Tools such as limits and continuity, Taylor expansions of functions, exponentials, logarithms, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors are reviewed or introduced as needed. There is a weekly computer work-station lab.

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Math. 186. Honors Analytic Geometry and Calculus II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the Honors advisor. Credit is granted for only one course from among Math. 114, 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, and 296. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is the Honors introduction to the calculus. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LS&A Honors Program. Topics covered include transcendental functions; techniques of integration; applications of calculus such as elementary differential equations, simple harmonic motion, and center of mass; conic sections; polar coordinates; infinite sequences and series including power series and Taylor series. Other topics, often an introduction to matrices and vector spaces, will be included at the discretion of the instructor. Math 116 is a somewhat less theoretical course which covers much of the same material. Math 285 is the natural sequel.

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Math. 215. Calculus III.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, or 296. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/courses/215/index.html

The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to concentrate in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a midterm and final exam. Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using Maple software. Math 285 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. For students intending to concentrate in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217. Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216.

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Math. 216. Introduction to Differential Equations.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, or 296. (4). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/courses/216/index.html

For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, Math 216-417 (or 419) and Math 217-316. The sequence Math 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of engineering and the sciences. Math concentrators and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence Math 217-316. After an introduction to ordinary differential equations, the first half of the course is devoted to topics in linear algebra, including systems of linear algebraic equations, vector spaces, linear dependence, bases, dimension, matrix algebra, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. In the second half these tools are applied to the solution of linear systems of ordinary differential equations. Topics include: oscillating systems, the Laplace transform, initial value problems, resonance, phase portraits, and an introduction to numerical methods. There is a weekly computer lab using MATLAB software. This course is not intended for mathematics concentrators, who should elect the sequence 217-316. Math 286 covers much of the same material in the Honors sequence. The sequence Math 217-316 covers all of this material and substantially more at greater depth and with greater emphasis on the theory. Math 404 covers further material on differential equations. Math 217 and 417 cover further material on linear algebra. Math 371 and 471 cover additional material on numerical methods.

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Math. 217. Linear Algebra.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215, 255, or 285. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Math. 417, 419, or 513. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, Math 216-417 (or 419) and Math 217-316. The sequence Math 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math concentrators and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence Math 217-316. These courses are explicitly designed to introduce the student to both the concepts and applications of their subjects and to the methods by which the results are proved. Therefore the student entering Math 217 should come with a sincere interest in learning about proofs. The topics covered include: systems of linear equations; matrix algebra; vectors, vector spaces, and subspaces; geometry of Rn; linear dependence, bases, and dimension; linear transformations; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; diagonalization; inner products. Throughout there will be emphasis on the concepts, logic, and methods of theoretical mathematics. Math 417 and 419 cover similar material with more emphasis on computation and applications and less emphasis on proofs. Math 513 covers more in a much more sophisticated way. The intended course to follow Math 217 is 316. Math 217 is also prerequisite for Math 412 and all more advanced courses in mathematics.

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Math. 255. Applied Honors Calculus III.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 156. (4). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Multivariable calculus, line, surface, and volume integrals; vector fields, Green's theorem, Stokes theorem; divergence theorem, applications. Maple will be used throughout.

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Math. 286. Honors Differential Equations.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 285. (3). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Math. 186 for a general description of the sequence Math 185-186-285-286.Topics include first-order differential equations, higher-order linear differential equations with constant coefficients, an introduction to linear algebra, linear systems, the Laplace Transform, series solutions and other numerical methods (Euler, Runge-Kutta). If time permits, Picard's Theorem will be proved. Math 216 and 316 cover much of the same material. Math 471 and/or 572 are natural sequels in the area of differential equations, but Math 286 is also preparation for more theoretical courses such as Math 451.

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Math. 288. Math Modeling Workshop.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 216 or 316, and Math. 217 or 417. (1). (Excl). (BS). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to help students understand more clearly how techniques from other undergraduate mathematics courses can be used in concert to solve real-world problems. After the first two lectures the class will discuss methods of attacking problems. For credit a student will have to describe and solve an individual problem and write a report on the solution. Computing methods will be used. During the weekly workshop students will be presented with real-world problems on which techniques of undergraduate mathematics offer insights. They will see examples of (1) how to approach and set up a given modeling problem systematically, (2) how to use mathematical techniques to begin a solution of the problem, (3) what to do about the loose ends that can't be solved, and (4) how to present the solution to others. Students will have a chance to use the skills developed by participating in the UM Undergraduate Math Modeling Meet.

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Math. 289. Problem Seminar.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the best ways to develop mathematical abilities is by solving problems using a variety of methods. Familiarity with numerous methods is a great asset to the developing student of mathematics. Methods learned in attacking a specific problem frequently find application in many other areas of mathematics. In many instances an interest in and appreciation of mathematics is better developed by solving problems than by hearing formal lectures on specific topics. The student has an opportunity to participate more actively in his/her education and development. This course is intended for superior students who have exhibited both ability and interest in doing mathematics, but it is not restricted to Honors students. This course is excellent preparation for the Putnam exam. Students and one or more faculty and graduate student assistants will meet in small groups to explore problems in many different areas of mathematics. Problems will be selected according to the interests and background of the students.

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Math. 296. Honors Mathematics II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior knowledge of first year calculus and permission of the Honors advisor. Credit is granted for only one course from among Math. 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, and 296. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The sequence Math 295-296-395-396 is a more intensive Honors sequence than 185-186-285-286. The material includes all of that of the lower sequence and substantially more. The approach is theoretical, abstract, and rigorous. Students are expected to learn to understand and construct proofs as well as do calculations and solve problems. The expected background is a thorough understanding of high school algebra and trigonometry. No previous calculus is required, although many students in this course have had some calculus. Students completing this sequence will be ready to take advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate courses. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LS&A Honors Program. The precise content depends on material covered in 295 but will generally include topics such as infinite series, power series, Taylor expansion, metric spaces. Other topics may include applications of analysis, Weierstrass Approximation theorem, elements of topology, introduction to linear algebra, complex numbers.

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Math. 312. Applied Modern Algebra.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 217. Only one credit granted to those who have completed Math. 412. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/courses/312/index.html

One of the main goals of the course (along with every course in the algebra sequence) is to expose students to rigorous, proof-oriented mathematics. Students are required to have taken Math 217, which should provide a first exposure to this style of mathematics. A distinguishing feature of this course is that the abstract concepts are not studied in isolation. Instead, each topic is studied with the ultimate goal being a real-world application. As currently organized, the course is broken into four parts. (1) the integers "mod n" and linear algebra over the integers mod p, with applications to error correcting codes; (2) some number theory, with applications to public-key cryptography; (3) polynomial algebra, with an emphasis on factoring algorithms over various fields, and (4) permutation groups, with applications to enumeration of discrete structures "up to automorphisms" (a.k.a. Pólya Theory). Math 412 is a more abstract and proof-oriented course with less emphasis on applications. EECS 303 (Algebraic Foundations of Computer Engineering) covers many of the same topics with a more applied approach. Another good follow-up course is Math 475 (Number Theory). Math 312 is one of the alternative prerequisites for Math 416, and several advanced EECS courses make substantial use of the material of Math 312. Math 412 is better preparation for most subsequent mathematics courses.

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Math. 316. Differential Equations.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215 and 217. Credit can be received for only one of Math. 216 or Math. 316, and credit can be received for only one of Math. 316 or Math. 404. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an introduction to differential equations for students who have studied linear algebra (Math 217). It treats techniques of solution (exact and approximate), existence and uniqueness theorems, some qualitative theory, and many applications. Proofs are given in class; homework problems include both computational and more conceptually oriented problems. First-order equations: solutions, existence and uniqueness, and numerical techniques; linear systems: eigenvector-eigenvalue solutions of constant coefficient systems, fundamental matrix solutions, nonhomogeneous systems; higher-order equations, reduction of order, variation of parameters, series solutions; qualitative behavior of systems, equilibrium points, stability. Applications to physical problems are considered throughout. Math 216 covers somewhat less material without the use of linear algebra and with less emphasis on theory. Math 286 is the Honors version of Math 316. Math 471 and/or 572 are natural sequels in the area of differential equations, but Math 316 is also preparation for more theoretical courses such as Math 451.

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Math. 333. Directed Tutoring.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 385 and enrollment in the Elementary Program in the School of Education. (1-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An experiential mathematics course for exceptional upper-level students in the elementary teacher certification program. Students tutor needy beginners enrolled in the introductory courses (Math 385 and Math 489) required of all elementary teachers. Permission of instructor.

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Math. 354. Fourier Analysis and its Applications.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 216, 256, 286, or 316. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Math. 454. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an introduction to Fourier analysis at an elementary level emphasizing applications. The main topics are Fourier series, discrete Fourier transforms, and continuous Fourier transforms. A substantial portion of the time is spent on both scientific/technological applications e.g., signal processing, Fourier optics), and applications in other branches of mathematics e.g., partial differential equations, probability theory, number theory). Students will do some computer work, using MATLAB, an interactive programming tool that is easy to use, but no previous experience with computers is necessary.

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Math. 371/Engin. 371. Numerical Methods for Engineers and Scientists.

Instructor(s): Zhong-Hui Duan (zduan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Engineering 101, and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~zduan/class/math371.ps

This is a survey course of the basic numerical methods which are used to solve practical scientific problems. Important concepts such as accuracy, stability, and efficiency are discussed. The course provides an introduction to MATLAB, an interactive program for numerical linear algebra, and may provide practice in FORTRAN programming and the use of a software library subroutine. Convergence theorems are discussed and applied, but the proofs are not emphasized. Floating point arithmetic, Gaussian elimination, polynomial interpolation, spline approximations, numerical integration and differentiation, solutions to non-linear equations, ordinary differential equations, polynomial approximations. Other topics may include discrete Fourier transforms, two-point boundary-value problems, and Monte-Carlo methods. Math 471 is a similar course which expects one more year of maturity and is somewhat more theoretical and less practical. The sequence Math 571-572 is a beginning graduate level sequence which covers both numerical algebra and differential equations and is much more theoretical. This course is basic for many later courses in science and engineering. It is good background for 571-572.

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Math. 396. Honors Analysis II.

Instructor(s): Igor Kriz (ikriz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 395. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~ikriz/

This course is a continuation of Math 395 and has the same theoretical emphasis. Students are expected to understand and construct proofs. Differential and integral calculus of functions on Euclidean spaces. Students who have successfully completed the sequence Math 295-396 are generally prepared to take a range of advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as Math 512, 513, 525, 590, and many others.

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Math. 399. Independent Reading.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Designed especially for Honors students.

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Math. 412. Introduction to Modern Algebra.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215, 255, or 285; and 217. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 512. Students with credit for 312 should take 512 rather than 412. One credit granted to those who have completed 312. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the methods and concepts of abstract mathematics. A typical student entering this course has substantial experience in using complex mathematical (calculus) calculations to solve physical or geometrical problems, but is unused to analyzing carefully the content of definitions of the logical flow of ideas which underlie and justify these calculations. Although the topics discussed here are quite distinct from those of calculus, an important goal of the course is to introduce the student to this type of analysis. Much of the reading, homework exercises, and exams consists of theorems (propositions, lemmas, etc. and their proofs. Math 217 or equivalent required as background. The initial topics include ones common to every branch of mathematics: sets, functions (mappings), relations, and the common number systems (integers, rational numbers, real numbers, complex numbers). These are then applied to the study of particular types of mathematical structures such as groups, rings, and fields. These structures are presented as abstractions from many examples such as the common number systems together with the operations of addition or multiplication, permutations of finite and infinite sets with function composition, sets of motions of geometric figures, and polynomials. Notions such as generator, subgroup, direct product, isomorphism, and homomorphism are defined and studied. Math 312 is a somewhat less abstract course which substitutes material on finite automata and other topics for some of the material on rings and fields of Math 412. Math 512 is an Honors version of Math 412 which treats more material in a deeper way. A student who successfully completes this course will be prepared to take a number of other courses in abstract mathematics: Math 416, 451, 475, 575, 481, 513, and 582. All of these courses will extend and deepen the student's grasp of modern abstract mathematics.

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Math. 417. Matrix Algebra I.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses beyond Math. 110. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 217, 419, or 513. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/courses/417/index.html

Many problems in science, engineering, and mathematics are best formulated in terms of matrices rectangular arrays of numbers. This course is an introduction to the properties of and operations on matrices with a wide variety of applications. The main emphasis is on concepts and problem-solving, but students are responsible for some of the underlying theory. Diversity rather than depth of applications is stressed. This course is not intended for mathematics concentrators, who should elect Math 217 or 513 (Honors). Topics include matrix operations, echelon form, general solutions of systems of linear equations, vector spaces and subspaces, linear independence and bases, linear transformations, determinants, orthogonality, characteristic polynomials, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and similarity theory. Applications include linear networks, least squares method (regression), discrete Markov processes, linear programming, and differential equations. Math 419 is an enriched version of Math 417 with a somewhat more theoretical emphasis. Math 217 (despite its lower number) is also a more theoretical course which covers much of the material of 417 at a deeper level. Math 513 is an Honors version of this course, which is also taken by some mathematics graduate students. Math 420 is the natural sequel but this course serves as prerequisite to several courses: Math 452, 462, 561, and 571.

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Math. 419/EECS 400/CS 400. Linear Spaces and Matrix Theory.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Four terms of college mathematics beyond Math 110. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 217 or 513. One credit granted to those who have completed Math. 417. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Math 419 covers much of the same ground as Math 417 but presents the material in a somewhat more abstract way in terms of vector spaces and linear transformations instead of matrices. There is a mix of proofs, calculations, and applications with the emphasis depending somewhat on the instructor. A previous proof-oriented course is helpful but by no means necessary. Basic notions of vector spaces and linear transformations: spanning, linear independence, bases, dimension, matrix representation of linear transformations; determinants; eigenvalues, eigenvectors, Jordan canonical form, inner-product spaces; unitary, self-adjoint, and orthogonal operators and matrices, applications to differential and difference equations. Math 417 is less rigorous and theoretical and more oriented to applications. Math 217 is similar to Math 419 but slightly more proof-oriented. Math 513 is much more abstract and sophisticated. Math 420 is the natural sequel, but this course serves as prerequisite to several courses: Math 452, 462, 561, and 571.

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Math. 420. Matrix Algebra II.

Instructor(s): James Milne (jmilne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 217, 417, or 419. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~jmilne/420.html

This course is intended to sharpen the student's skills in the manipulations and applications of linear algebra. Some proofs are given, and the object is to learn to use the theory to solve problems. One previous proof-oriented course is recommended, although not required. Similarity theory, Euclidean and unitary geometry, applications to linear and differential equations, interpolation theory, least squares and principal components, B-splines.

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Math. 424. Compound Interest and Life Insurance.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215, 255, or 285. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the concepts underlying the theory of interest and then applies them to concrete problems. The course also includes applications of spreadsheet software. The course is a prerequisite to advanced actuarial courses. It also helps students prepare for the Part 4A examination of the Casualty Actuarial Society and the Course 140 examination of the Society of Actuaries. The course covers compound interest (growth) theory and its application to valuation of monetary deposits, annuities, and bonds. Problems are approached both analytically (using algebra) and geometrically (using pictorial representations). Techniques are applied to real-life situations: bank accounts, bond prices, etc. The text is used as a guide because it is prescribed for the Society of Actuaries exam; the material covered will depend somewhat on the instructor. Math 424 is required for students concentrating in actuarial mathematics; others may take Math 147, which deals with the same techniques but with less emphasis on continuous growth situations. Math 520 applies the concepts of Math 424 together with probability theory to the valuation of life contingencies (death benefits and pensions).

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Math. 425/Stat. 425. Introduction to Probability.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215, 255, or 285. (3). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to useful and interesting ideas of the mathematical theory of probability and to a number of applications of probability to a variety of fields including genetics, economics, geology, business, and engineering. The theory developed together with other mathematical tools such as combinatorics and calculus are applied to everyday problems. Concepts, calculations, and derivations are emphasized. The course will make essential use of the material of Math 116 and 215. Math concentrators should be sure to elect sections of the course that are taught by Mathematics (not Statistics) faculty. Topics include the basic results and methods of both discrete and continuous probability theory: conditional probability, independent events, random variables, jointly distributed random variables, expectations, variances, covariances. Different instructors will vary the emphasis. Math 525 is a similar course for students with stronger mathematical background and ability. Stat 426 is a natural sequel for students interested in statistics. Math 523 includes many applications of probability theory.

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Math. 425/Stat. 425. Introduction to Probability.

Instructor(s): P. Jeganathan (jegan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215, 255, or 285. (3). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Statistics 425.003, 004.

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Math. 425/Stat. 425. Introduction to Probability.

Instructor(s): Choudhuri

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215, 255, or 285. (3). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Statistics 425.003, 004.

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Math. 450. Advanced Mathematics for Engineers I.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 216, 256, 286, or 316. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Although this course is designed principally to develop mathematics for application to problems of science and engineering, it also serves as an important bridge for students between the calculus courses and the more demanding advanced courses. Students are expected to learn to read and write mathematics at a more sophisticated level and to combine several techniques to solve problems. Some proofs are given, and students are responsible for a thorough understanding of definitions and theorems. Students should have a good command of the material from Math 215, and 216 or 316, which is used throughout the course. A background in linear algebra, e.g. Math 217, is highly desirable, as is familiarity with Maple software. Topics include a review of curves and surfaces in implicit, parametric, and explicit forms; differentiability and affine approximations; implicit and inverse function theorems; chain rule for 3-space; multiple integrals; scalar and vector fields; line and surface integrals; computations of planetary motion, work, circulation, and flux over surfaces; Gauss' and Stokes' Theorems, derivation of continuity and heat equation. Some instructors include more material on higher dimensional spaces and an introduction to Fourier series. Math 450 is an alternative to Math 451 as a prerequisite for several more advanced courses. Math 454 and 555 are the natural sequels for students with primary interest in engineering applications.

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Math. 451. Advanced Calculus I.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215 and one course beyond Math. 215; or Math. 255 or 285. Intended for concentrators; other students should elect Math. 450. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course has two complementary goals: (1) a rigorous development of the fundamental ideas of calculus, and (2) a further development of the student's ability to deal with abstract mathematics and mathematical proofs. The key words here are "rigor" and "proof"; almost all of the material of the course consists in understanding and constructing definitions, theorems (propositions, lemmas, etc. and proofs. This is considered one of the more difficult among the undergraduate mathematics courses, and students should be prepared to make a strong commitment to the course. In particular, it is strongly recommended that some course which requires proofs (such as Math 412) be taken before Math 451. Topics include: logic and techniques of proof; sets, functions, and relations; cardinality; the real number system and its topology; infinite sequences, limits and continuity; differentiation; integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; infinite series; sequences and series of functions. There is really no other course which covers the material of Math 451. Although Math 450 is an alternative prerequisite for some later courses, the emphasis of the two courses is quite distinct. The natural sequel to Math 451 is 452, which extends the ideas considered here to functions of several variables. In a sense, Math 451 treats the theory behind Math 115-116, while Math 452 does the same for Math 215 and a part of Math 216. Math 551 is a more advanced version of Math 452. Math 451 is also a prerequisite for several other courses: Math 575, 590, 596, and 597.

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Math. 452. Advanced Calculus II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 217, 417, or 419; and Math. 451. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course does a rigorous development of multivariable calculus and elementary function theory with some view towards generalizations. Concepts and proofs are stressed. This is a relatively difficult course, but the stated prerequisites provide adequate preparation. Topics include: (1) partial derivatives and differentiability; (2) gradients, directional derivatives, and the chain rule; (3) implicit function theorem; (4) surfaces, tangent plane; (5) max-min theory; (6) multiple integration, change of variable, etc., (7) Green's and Stokes' theorems, differential forms, exterior derivatives. Math 551 is a higher-level course covering much of the same material with greater emphasis on differential geometry. Math 450 covers the same material and a bit more with more emphasis on applications, and no emphasis on proofs. Math 452 is prerequisite to Math 572 and is good general background for any of the more advanced courses in analysis (Math 596, 597) or differential geometry or topology (Math 537, 635).

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Math. 454. Boundary Value Problems for Partial Differential Equations.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 216, 256, 286, or 316. Students with credit for Math. 354 can elect Math. 454 for one credit. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is devoted to the use of Fourier series and other orthogonal expansions in the solution of boundary-value problems for second-order linear partial differential equations. Emphasis is on concepts and calculation. The official prerequisite is ample preparation. Classical representation and convergence theorems for Fourier series; method of separation of variables for the solution of the one-dimensional heat and wave equation; the heat and wave equations in higher dimensions; spherical and cylindrical Bessel functions; Legendre polynomials; methods for evaluating asymptotic integrals (Laplace's method, steepest descent); Fourier and Laplace transforms; applications to linear input-output systems, analysis of data smoothing and filtering, signal processing, time-series analysis, and spectral analysis. Both Math 455 and 554 cover many of the same topics but are very seldom offered. Math 454 is prerequisite to Math 571 and 572, although it is not a formal prerequisite, it is good background for Math 556.

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Math. 463. Mathematical Modeling in Biology.

Section 001 Mathematical Biology

Instructor(s): James Sneyd (jsneyd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 217, 417, or 419; 286 or 316. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~jsneyd/Math463/math463.html

This course will concentrate on the applications of ordinary differential equations to physiological systems. Partial differential equations will not be covered in detail. Thus, a course in ODEs such as 216 or 316 will be sufficient preparation for this course.

Who could take the course? Basically anybody who is interested in applying mathematical methods to the biological sciences. For instance, students from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Complex Systems, Biophysics, Biomedical Engineering, Mathematics, Chemical Engineering, Physiology, Microbiology, Epidemiology.

What kind of background will you need? Basically a course in differential equations, such as 216 or 316. If you have never seen a differential equation before, you may have trouble with the course. You will also need to be familiar and comfortable with computers, as a lot of the work in the course will have to be done on a computer. You will not need to be an expert in biology, as we will learn most of what we need to know as we go

How will the course be graded? I will assign projects to do throughout the term, and there will also be written assignments. The projects will require a lot of computing, and students will be able to choose between a selection of projects. There will also be a final examination, probably a take-home exam, but I have not yet decided this for sure.

Topics

The last few topics are flexible. Depending on student interest, we could cover any topic from the textbook, including the visual system, hearing, pulsatile hormone secretion, pattern formation, or wave propagation.

Text

Mathematical Physiology by Keener and Sneyd, Springer, 1998. This has a lot of additional material, but does cover the majority of the syllabus. A lot of the lecture material (but not all) will be taken from this book, as will lots of the problems.

Other Recommended Books

Mathematical Models in Biology, by Edelstein-Keshet, McGraw-Hill,1988. Very expensive book, but covers a lot of basic material, concentrating on population biology and ecology sorts of things. Also covers a lot of basic math stuff, although not as well as many other books.

Mathematical Biology, by J. Murray, Springer, 1989. Covers a huge amount of stuff. An excellent book, but mostly too advanced for this course. Great for reference though, for all students interested in the field. One of the great books in the field.

Mathematics in Medicine and the Life Sciences, by Hoppensteadt and Peskin, Springer. A bit more elementary, but lots of good stuff.

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos, by S. Strogatz. This is probably the best book for revising phase plane theory, elementary bifurcations and differential equations. Has lots of applications, including some from biology.

Differential Equations and Their Applications, by Braun. This is another excellent book for learning differential equations, with applications to all kinds of things, including disease models, the theory of conflict, population models etc. Review of phase-plane methods for ordinary differential equations.

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Math. 464/BiomedE 464. Inverse Problems.

Section 001 Mathematics and Medical Imaging
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of Math. 217, 417, or 419; and one of Math. 216, 256, 286, or 316. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Solution of an inverse problem is a central component of fields such as medical tomography, geophysics, non-destructive testing, and control theory. The solution of any practical inverse problem is an interdisciplinary task. Each such problem requires a blending of mathematical constructs and physical realities. Thus, each problem has its own unique components; on the other hand, there is a common mathematical framework for these problems and their solutions. The course content is often motivated by a particular inversion problem from a field such as medical tomography (transmission, emission), geophysics (remote sensing, inverse scattering, tomography), or non-destructive testing. Mathematical topics include ill-posedness (existence, uniqueness, stability), regularization (e.g., Tikhonov, least squares, modified least squares, variation, mollification), pseudoinverses, transforms e.g., k-plane, Radon, X-ray, Hilbert), special functions, and singular-value decomposition. Physical aspects of particular inverse problems will be introduced as needed, but the emphasis of the course is investigation of the mathematical concepts related to analysis and solution of inverse problems.

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Math. 471. Introduction to Numerical Methods.

Instructor(s): Zhong-Hui Duan (zduan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 216, 256, 286, or 316; and 217, 417, or 419; and a working knowledge of one high-level computer language. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~zduan/class/math471.ps

This is a survey of the basic numerical methods which are used to solve scientific problems. The emphasis is evenly divided between the analysis of the methods and their practical applications. Some convergence theorems and error bounds are proved. The course also provides an introduction to MATLAB, an interactive program for numerical linear algebra, as well as practice in computer programming. One goal of the course is to show how calculus and linear algebra are used in numerical analysis. Topics may include computer arithmetic, Newton's method for non-linear equations, polynomial interpolation, numerical integration, systems of linear equations, initial value problems for ordinary differential equations, quadrature, partial pivoting, spline approximations, partial differential equations, Monte Carlo methods, 2-point boundary value problems, Dirichlet problem for the Laplace equation. Math 371 is a less sophisticated version intended principally for sophomore and junior engineering students; the sequence Math 571-572 is mainly taken by graduate students, but should be considered by strong undergraduates. Math 471 is good preparation for Math 571 and 572, although it is not prerequisite to these courses.

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Math. 471. Introduction to Numerical Methods.

Instructor(s): Ronnie Sircar (sircar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 216, 256, 286, or 316; and 217, 417, or 419; and a working knowledge of one high-level computer language. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~sircar/math471.html

This is a survey of the basic numerical methods which are used to solve scientific problems. The emphasis is evenly divided between the analysis of the methods and their practical applications. Some convergence theorems and error bounds are proved. The course also provides an introduction to MATLAB, an interactive program for numerical linear algebra, as well as practice in computer programming. One goal of the course is to show how calculus and linear algebra are used in numerical analysis. Topics may include computer arithmetic, Newton's method for non-linear equations, polynomial interpolation, numerical integration, systems of linear equations, initial value problems for ordinary differential equations, quadrature, partial pivoting, spline approximations, partial differential equations, Monte Carlo methods, 2-point boundary value problems, Dirichlet problem for the Laplace equation. Math 371 is a less sophisticated version intended principally for sophomore and junior engineering students; the sequence Math 571-572 is mainly taken by graduate students, but should be considered by strong undergraduates. Math 471 is good preparation for Math 571 and 572, although it is not prerequisite to these courses.

Books: An Introduction to Numerical Analysis by K.E. Atkinson (Textbook) Introduction to Scientific Computing by C. Van Loan. (For reference).

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Math. 475. Elementary Number Theory.

Prerequisites & Distribution: At least three terms of college mathematics are recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an elementary introduction to number theory, especially congruence arithmetic. Number theory is one of the few areas of mathematics in which problems easily describable to a layman (is every even number the sum of two primes?) have remained unsolved for centuries. Recently some of these fascinating but seemingly useless questions have come to be of central importance in the design of codes and cyphers. The methods of number theory are often elementary in requiring little formal background. In addition to strictly number-theoretic questions, concrete examples of structures such as rings and fields from abstract algebra are discussed. Concepts and proofs are emphasized, but there is some discussion of algorithms which permit efficient calculation. Students are expected to do simple proofs and may be asked to perform computer experiments. Although there are no special prerequisites and the course is essentially self-contained, most students have some experience in abstract mathematics and problem solving and are interested in learning proofs. A Computational Laboratory (Math 476, 1 credit) will usually be offered as an optional supplement to this course. Topics usually include the Euclidean algorithm, primes and unique factorization, congruences, Chinese Remainder Theorem, Hensel's Lemma, Diophantine equations, arithmetic in polynomial rings, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity and quadratic fields. Math 575 moves much faster, covers more material, and requires more difficult exercises. There is some overlap with Math 412 which stresses the algebraic content. Math 475 may be followed by Math 575 and is good preparation for Math 412. All of the advanced number theory courses, Math 675, 676, 677, 678, and 679, presuppose the material of Math 575, although a good student may get by with Math 475. Each of these is devoted to a special subarea of number theory.

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Math. 476. Computational Laboratory in Number Theory.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Math. 475 or 575. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students will be provided software with which to conduct numerical explorations. Students will submit reports of their findings weekly. No programming necessary, but students interested in programming will have the opportunity to embark on their own projects. Participation in the laboratory should boost the student's performance in Math 475 or Math 575. Students in the lab will see mathematics as an exploratory science (as mathematicians do). Students will gain a knowledge of algorithms which have been developed (some quite recently) for number-theoretic purposes, e.g., for factoring. No exams.

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Math. 485. Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers and Supervisors.

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year of high school algebra. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 385. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be included in a concentration plan in mathematics.

No Description Provided.

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Math. 486. Concepts Basic to Secondary Mathematics.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215, 255, or 285. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for students who intend to teach junior high or high school mathematics. It is advised that the course be taken relatively early in the program to help the student decide whether or not this is an appropriate goal. Concepts and proofs are emphasized over calculation. The course is conducted in a discussion format. Class participation is expected and constitutes a significant part of the course grade. Topics covered have included problem solving; sets, relations and functions; the real number system and its subsystems; number theory; probability and statistics; difference sequences and equations; interest and annuities; algebra; and logic. This material is covered in the course pack and scattered points in the text book. There is no real alternative, but the requirement of Math 486 may be waived for strong students who intend to do graduate work in mathematics. Prior completion of Math 486 may be of use for some students planning to take Math 312, 412, or 425.

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Math. 489. Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 385 or 485. May not be used in any graduate program in mathematics. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, together with its predecessor Math 385, provides a coherent overview of the mathematics underlying the elementary and middle school curriculum. It is required of all students intending to earn an elementary teaching certificate and is taken almost exclusively by such students. Concepts are heavily emphasized with some attention given to calculation and proof. The course is conducted using a discussion format. Class participation is expected and constitutes a significant part of the course grade. Enrollment is limited to 30 students per section. Although only two years of high school mathematics are required, a more complete background including pre-calculus or calculus is desirable. Topics covered include fractions and rational numbers, decimals and real numbers, probability and statistics, geometric figures, and measurement. Algebraic techniques and problem-solving strategies are used throughout the course.

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Math. 490. Introduction to Topology.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 412 or 451 or equivalent experience with abstract mathematics. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course in an introduction to both point-set and algebraic topology. Although much of the presentation is theoretical and proof-oriented, the material is well-suited for developing intuition and giving convincing proofs which are pictorial or geometric rather than completely rigorous. There are many interesting examples of topologies and manifolds, some from common experience (combing a hairy ball, the utilities problem). In addition to the stated prerequisites, courses containing some group theory (Math 412 or 512) and advanced calculus (Math 451) are desirable although not absolutely necessary. The topics covered are fairly constant but the presentation and emphasis will vary significantly with the instructor. Point-set topology, examples of topological spaces, orientable and non-orientable surfaces, fundamental groups, homotopy, covering spaces. Metric and Euclidean spaces are emphasized. Math 590 is a deeper and more difficult presentation of much of the same material which is taken mainly by mathematics graduate students. Math 433 is a related course at about the same level. Math 490 is not prerequisite for any later course but provides good background for Math 590 or any of the other courses in geometry or topology.

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Math. 512. Algebraic Structures.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 451 or 513. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 412. Math. 512 requires more mathematical maturity than Math. 412. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is one of the more abstract and difficult courses in the undergraduate program. It is frequently elected by students who have completed the 295-396 sequence. Its goal is to introduce students to the basic structures of modern abstract algebra (groups, rings, and fields) in a rigorous way. Emphasis is on concepts and proofs; calculations are used to illustrate the general theory. Exercises tend to be quite challenging. Students should have some previous exposure to rigorous proof-oriented mathematics and be prepared to work hard. Students from Math 285 are strongly advised to take some 400-500 level course first, for example, Math 513. Some background in linear algebra is strongly recommended.

The course covers basic definitions and properties of groups, rings, and fields, including homomorphisms, isomorphisms, and simplicity. Further topics are selected from (1) Group Theory: Sylow theorems, Structure Theorem for finitely-generated Abelian groups, permutation representations, the symmetric and alternating groups; (2) Ring Theory: Euclidean, principal ideal, and unique factorization domains, polynomial rings in one and several variables, algebraic varieties, ideals; and (3) Field Theory: statement of the Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory, Nullstellensatz, subfields of the complex numbers and the integers mod p.

Math 412 is a substantially lower-level course over about half of the material of Math 512. The sequence Math 593-594 covers about twice as much Group and Field Theory as well as several other topics and presupposes that students have had a previous introduction to these concepts at least at the level of Math 412. Together with Math 513, this course is excellent preparation for the sequence Math 593-594.

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Math. 513. Introduction to Linear Algebra.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 412 or permission of Honors advisor. Two credits granted to those who have completed Math. 417; one credit granted to those who have completed Math 217 or 419. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an introduction to the theory of abstract vector spaces and linear transformations. The emphasis is on concepts and proofs with some calculations to illustrate the theory. For students with only the minimal prerequisite, this is a demanding course; at least one additional proof-oriented course e.g., Math 451 or 512) is recommended. Topics are selected from: vector spaces over arbitrary fields (including finite fields); linear transformations, bases, and matrices; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; applications to linear and linear differential equations; bilinear and quadratic forms; spectral theorem; Jordan Canonical Form. Math 419 covers much of the same material using the same text, but there is more stress on computation and applications. Math 217 is similarly proof-oriented but significantly less demanding than Math 513. Math 417 is much less abstract and more concerned with applications. The natural sequel to Math 513 is 593. Math 513 is also prerequisite to several other courses (Math 537, 551, 571, and 575) and may always be substituted for Math 417 or 419.

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Math. 521. Life Contingencies II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 520. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course extends the single decrement and single life ideas of Math 520 to multi-decrement and multiple-life applications directly related to life insurance. The sequence Math 520-521 covers the Part 4A examination of the Casualty Actuarial Society and covers the syllabus of the Course 150 examination of the Society of Actuaries. Concepts and calculation are emphasized over proof. Topics include multiple life models joint life, last survivor, contingent insurance; multiple decrement models disability, withdrawal, retirement, etc.; and reserving models for life insurance. Math 522 is a parallel course covering mathematical models for prefunded retirement benefit programs.

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Math. 523. Risk Theory.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 425. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Risk management is of major concern to all financial institutions and is an active area of modern finance. This course is relevant for students with interests in finance, risk management, or insurance and provides background for the professional examinations in Risk Theory offered by the Society of Actuaries and the Casualty Actuary Society. Students should have a basic knowledge of common probability distributions (Poisson, exponential, gamma, binomial, etc. and have at least junior standing. Two major problems will be considered: (1) modeling of payouts of a financial intermediary when the amount and timing vary stochastically over time; and (2) modeling of the ongoing solvency of a financial intermediary subject to stochastically varying capital flow. These topics will be treated historically beginning with classical approaches and proceeding to more dynamic models. Connections with ordinary and partial differential equations will be emphasized. Classical approaches to risk including the insurance principle and the risk-reward tradeoff. Review of probability. Bachelier and Lundberg models of investment and loss aggregation. Fallacy of time diversification and its generalizations. Geometric Brownian motion and the compound Poisson process. Modeling of individual losses which arise in a loss aggregation process. Distributions for modeling size loss, statistical techniques for fitting data, and credibility. Economic rationale for insurance, problems of adverse selection and moral hazard, and utility theory. The three most significant results of modern finance: the Markowitz portfolio selection model, the capital asset pricing model of Sharpe, Lintner and Moissin, and (time permitting) the Black-Scholes option pricing model.

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Math. 524. Topics in Actuarial Science II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 424, 425, and 520; and Stat. 426. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Topics covered are: the nature and properties of survival models, including both parametric and tabular models; methods of estimating tabular models from both complete and incomplete data samples, including the actuarial, moment, and maximum likelihood estimation techniques; methods of estimating parametric models from both complete and incomplete data samples, including parametric models with concomitant variables; evaluation of estimators from sample data; valuation schedule exposure formulas; and practical issues in survival model estimation.

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Math. 528. Topics in Casualty Insurance.

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math 217, 417, or 419. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Math. 531. Transformation Groups in Geometry.

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215, 255, or 285. (3). (Excl). (BS).

No Description Provided.

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Math. 555. Introduction to Functions of a Complex Variable with Applications.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 450 or 451. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the theory of complex valued functions of a complex variable with substantial attention to applications in science and engineering. Concepts, calculations, and the ability to apply principles to physical problems are emphasized over proofs, but arguments are rigorous. The prerequisite of a course in advanced calculus is essential. Differentiation and integration of complex valued functions of a complex variable, series, mappings, residues, applications. Evaluation of improper real integrals, fluid dynamics. Math 596 covers all of the theoretical material of Math 555 and usually more at a higher level and with emphasis on proofs rather than applications. Math 555 is prerequisite to many advanced courses in science and engineering fields.

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Math. 557. Methods of Applied Mathematics II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math 217, 419, or 513; 451 and 555. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Although this is a continuation of Math 556, this course is not really required as a prerequisite. A strong background in complex analysis and linear algebra is essential. There is somewhat less emphasis on proofs than in Math 556. Topics include transform methods for partial differential equations, asymptotic expansions, regular and singular perturbation problems, non-linear stability theory, bifurcations, non-linear evolution equations, and associated phenomena.

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Math. 558. Ordinary Differential Equations.

Section 001 Applied Dynamical Systems

Instructor(s): Robert Krasny (krasny@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 450 or 451. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~krasny/math558.html

The theory of dynamical systems provides a means for understanding complex behaviour in a broad range of applications. This course is an introduction to the theory, with emphasis on chaotic dynamics. We will study continuous systems (differential equations) and discrete systems (iterated maps). I aim to provide a broad overview of the subject as well as an in-depth analysis of specific examples. The course is intended for students in mathematics, engineering, and science.

The topics include: bifurcations (transcritical, pitchfork, subcritical, supercritical, Hopf), stable and unstable manifolds, dissipative systems, attractors, logistic map, period-doubling, Feigenbaum sequence, renormalization, chaos, Lyapunov exponent, fractals, Cantor set, Hausdorff dimension, Lorenz system, nonlinear oscillations, quasiperiodicity, Hamiltonian systems, integrability, resonance, KAM tori, homoclinic intersections, Melnikov's method.

Text: Nonlinear Systems by P. G. Drazin, Cambridge University Press. Course Requirements: homework assignments, final exam/project.

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Math. 561/SMS 518 (Business Administration)/IOE 510. Linear Programming I.

Instructor(s): Goldberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 217, 417, or 419. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Formulation of problems from the private and public sectors using the mathematical model of linear programming. Development of the simplex algorithm; duality theory and economic interpretations. Postoptimality (sensitivity) analysis; applications and interpretations. Introduction to transportation and assignment problems; special purpose algorithms and advanced computational techniques. Students have opportunities to formulate and solve models developed from more complex case studies and use various computer programs.

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Math. 567. Introduction to Coding Theory.

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of Math 217, 419, 513. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to coding theory, focusing on the mathematical background for linear error-correcting codes. It will begin with a discussion of Shannon's theorem and channel capacity. The definition of linear codes will be given along with a review of necessary tools from linear algebra and an introduction to abstract algebra and finite fields. Basic examples of codes will be studied including the Hamming, BCH, cyclic, Melas, Reed-Muller, and Ree-Solomon codes. An introduction to the problem of decoding will be included, starting with syndrome decoding and covering weight enumerator polynomials and the Mac-Williams Sloane identity. Further topics to be included range from consideration of asymptotic parameters and bounds to a discussion of algebraic geometric codes in their simplest form.

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Math. 571. Numerical Methods for Scientific Computing I.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Rauch (rauch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 217, 419, or 513; and 454. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~rauch/courses.html

This course is a rigorous introduction to numerical linear algebra with applications to 2-point boundary value problems and the Laplace equation in two dimensions. Both theoretical and computational aspects of the subject are discussed. Some of the homework problems require computer programming. Students should have a strong background in linear algebra and calculus, and some programming experience. The topics covered usually include direct and iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations: Gaussian elimination, Cholesky decomposition, Jacobi iteration, Gauss-Seidel iteration, the SOR method, an introduction to the multigrid method, conjugate gradient method; finite element and difference discretizations of boundary value problems for the Poisson equation in one and two dimensions; numerical methods for computing eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Math 471 is a survey course in numerical methods at a more elementary level. Math 572 covers initial value problems for ordinary and partial differential equations. Math 571 and 572 may be taken in either order. Math 671 (Analysis of Numerical Methods I) is an advanced course in numerical analysis with varying topics chosen by the instructor.

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Math. 572. Numerical Methods for Scientific Computing II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 217, 419, or 513; and 454. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is one of the basic courses for students beginning study towards the Ph.D. degree in mathematics. Graduate students from engineering and science departments and strong undergraduates are also welcome. The course is an introduction to numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations and hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations. Fundamental concepts and methods of analysis are emphasized. Students should have a strong background in linear algebra and analysis, and some experience with computer programming. Content varies somewhat with the instructor. Numerical methods for ordinary differential equations; Lax's equivalence theorem; finite difference and spectral methods for linear time dependent PDEs: diffusion equations, scalar first order hyperbolic equations, symmetric hyperbolic systems. There is no real alternative; Math 471 covers a small part of the same material at a lower level. Math 571 and 572 may be taken in either order. Math 671 (Analysis of Numerical Methods I) is an advanced course in numerical analysis with varying topics chosen by the instructor.

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Math. 582. Introduction to Set Theory.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 412 or 451 or equivalent experience with abstract mathematics. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the great discoveries of modern mathematics was that essentially every mathematical concept may be defined in terms of sets and membership. Thus set theory plays a special role as a foundation for the whole of mathematics. One of the goals of this course is to develop some understanding of how set theory plays this role. The analysis of common mathematical concepts, e.g., function, ordering, infinity) in set-theoretic terms leads to a deeper understanding of these concepts. At the same time, the student will be introduced to many new concepts, e.g., transfinite ordinal and cardinal numbers, the Axiom of Choice) which play a major role in many branches of mathematics. The development of set theory will be largely axiomatic with the emphasis on proving the main results from the axioms. Students should have substantial experience with theorem-proof mathematics; the listed prerequisites are minimal, and stronger preparation is recommended. No course in mathematical logic is presupposed. The main topics covered are set algebra (union, intersection), relations and functions, orderings (partial, linear, well), the natural numbers, finite and denumerable sets, the Axiom of Choice, and ordinal and cardinal numbers. Some elementary set theory is typically covered in a number of advanced courses, but Math 582 is the only course which presents a thorough development of the subject. Math 582 is not an explicit prerequisite for any later course, but it is excellent background for many of the advanced courses numbered Math 590 and above.

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Math. 592. Introduction to Algebraic Topology.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 591. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is one of the basic courses for students beginning study towards the Ph.D. degree in mathematics. The approach is theoretical and rigorous, and emphasizes abstract concepts and proofs. Fundamental group, covering spaces, simplicial complexes, graphs and trees, applications to group theory, singular and simplicial homology, Eilenberg-Maclane axioms, Brouwer's and Lefschetz' fixed-point theorems, and other topics.

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Math. 594. Algebra II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 593. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is one of the basic courses for students beginning study towards the Ph.D. degree in mathematics. The approach is theoretical and rigorous and emphasizes abstract concepts and proofs. Topics include group theory, permutation representations, simplicity of alternating groups for n 4, Sylow theorems, series in groups, solvable and nilpotent groups, Jordan-Hölder Theorem for groups with operators, free groups and presentations, fields and field extensions, norm and trace, algebraic closure, Galois theory, transcendence degree.

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Math. 597. Analysis II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 451 and 513. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is one of the basic courses for students beginning study towards the Ph.D. degree in mathematics. The approach is theoretical and rigorous and emphasizes abstract concepts and proofs. Topics include Lebesgue measure on the real line; measurable functions and integration on R; differentiation theory, fundamental theorem of calculus; function spaces, Lp(R), C(K), Hölder and Minkowski inequalities, duality; general measure spaces, product measures, Fubini's Theorem; Radon-Nikodym Theorem, conditional expectation, signed measures, introduction to Fourier transforms.

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