Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Political Science (Division 450)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Political Science.


Pol. Sci. 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wingrove (ewingrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to some classic accounts of politics in the Western tradition, and to some critiques thereof. Readings include: Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Arendt, and King. Among the themes to be addressed: what, if anything, makes state authority legitimate? Do people benefit from political participation, or is it inevitably corrupting, confusing, irritating, and/or tiresome? What constitutes a public, rather than a private, concern?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Instructor(s): Christina Fastnow (cfastnow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~pol111/

This is a broad survey of government and politics in the United States which explores a wide range of topics including public opinion, elections, interest groups, the presidency, Congress, and the courts. We will examine the basic structure of American government and politics, namely, what are the rules that govern this system? We will also see how those rules have changed over time, and to what ends. Some specific questions covered in the course are: What makes one set of interests more successful in the public sphere? Are political parties meaningful anymore? What accounts for swings in voting behavior and election outcome from one time to another? What influences a member of Congress' voting decision? In what ways do presidents and bureaucrats affect public policies? This is not a comprehensive list but suggests the kinds of issues that are discussed in this course. There are two lectures and two discussion section meetings each week. There is generally a midterm, a final examination, and some other written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Instructor(s): Ronald Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and Nigeria. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Instructor(s): Harold Jacobson (hkj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~compap/NEWhome/faculty/Jake/160.html

This course analyzes world politics from a broad and general perspective, explaining and exploring the principles involved in the functioning of the global political system and illustrating these principles with contemporary material. The course begins by examining the basic structural features of the contemporary global political system. It considers the development of states and nationalism and then assesses the importance of actors other than nation states, such as international governmental and non-governmental organizations and multi-national corporations. Factors shaping the foreign policy behavior of states are considered next. Attention is then directed to the instruments of foreign policy behavior the use or threat of use of military force, economic aid and sanctions, and Diplomacy and negotiations. Next, patterns of collaboration and cooperation among states are considered. Finally, trends that could point toward future developments in the global political system are considered.

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Pol. Sci. 353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict.

Instructor(s): Raymond Tanter (rtanter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rtanter/ps353w99syl.html

Knowledge about Arab-Israeli conflicts is the focus of the course. Although there are lectures on the origins of the conflicts, they do not lay blame on any of the parties: The course is not about who is right or wrong but why there are conflicts in the Arab-Israeli zone, and what are the scenarios of their futures. Lectures address the history of the conflicts from the perspective of general social science theory. Discussion sections give students a forum for assessing the relationship between events and ideas. Core theoretical concepts include bargaining and negotiation; crisis as an opportunity for diplomacy; how global, regional, and domestic factors explain conflict and cooperation; the relation of force to diplomacy; the effect of threat on deterrence, coercion, and escalation; as well as incremental versus comprehensive approaches to the peace process. The course discusses the Arab/Persian Gulf as it bears on Arab-Israeli zone. There are no prerequisites. There are a midterm exam and a final. There is extensive use of conferencing on the web, COW, in order to make use of the Internet to explore war and peace scenarios in the Arab-Israeli and Gulf zones.

The course meets in a room with an ethernet connection in order for the instructor to have online access to the syllabus, lecture notes, research sites, and papers written by former participants in this course.

See:
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rtanter/
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rtanter/w98ps353syl.html
http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/frames/arabisfr.html
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rtanter/W98PS353498PAPERS/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Pol. Sci. 401. Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent.

Instructor(s): Arlene Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing or two courses in political science. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the history of political thought from Hobbes through Nietzsche. We will focus on changing conceptions of the purpose of political society, the origins of political authority, the nature and value of political participation, the nature of liberty and equality through intensive reading of the primary texts of Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, John Stuart Mill, and Marx. Brief selections from other authors will be included. All readings will be from the original works. There are no secondary textbooks for this class. Two meetings per week will be devoted to lectures and discussion. The class will divide up and meet in one hour of discussion sections as well. There will be one in-class midterm examination, two brief papers, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

Pol. Sci. 406. American Political Thought.

Instructor(s): E.S. McKee (wahoowa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will examine some of the central texts that have shaped American thinking on political and legal questions. Among the issues to be discussed: What should we make of the structure of American constitutionalism and federalism? How have various writers dealt with slavery and its legacies? How should we think about liberty, equality, individualism, conflict, and consensus? When should we obey, or disobey, the law in a democracy? How should we determine who has appropriate standing as a citizen? What kind of economy best preserves the democratic form of government?

Grades will be based on two papers and a final exam. Authors and texts may include Ben Franklin, The Federalist Papers, The Anti-Federalists, Henry Thoreau, The Lincoln/Douglass Debates, Mark Twain, Henry Adams, Edward Bellamy, William Graham Sumner, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W.E.B. DuBois, and Wendell Berry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 410. American Policy Processes.

Instructor(s): Christina Fastnow (cfastnow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~pol410

This course examines the creation and implementation of public programs in the United States. Lectures, discussion, readings, and written assignments focus on the policy-making roles of Congress and the presidency and the policy-implementation roles of the bureaucracy and courts. We will pay special attention to the way the federal branches share power, and we will examine the contribution of various levels of government to policy formulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 411. American Political Processes.

Section 001 Public Opinion and National Elections

Instructor(s): Vincent Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course views outcomes in American elections presidential and congressional as expressions of public opinion. While frequent references will be made to recent elections, our central purpose will be to understand American elections in general. For example, How well do citizens choose a president?, senator?, or member of congress? Readings will focus primarily around a course pack. Grades likely will depend on a midterm, a final exam, and a 10-page paper.

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Pol. Sci. 414. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

Section 001 Civil Liberties in the American constitutional System. Sections 002-007 may be elected ECB

Instructor(s): Mark Brandon (mbrandon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is concerned with civil liberties in the American constitutional system. It will focus on decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, but will also draw on literature from other sources. The primary substantive aim of the course is to help students develop a theoretically informed understanding of civil liberties and of the institutional devices for enforcing them. Additional aims include helping students to read and criticize political texts, to assess constitutional arguments, and to think and write more rigorously. Course expectations: Students are expected to have read assignments before class and to be prepared to discuss them in class. Written work will consist of the following: two papers (10% of grade for each paper); participation in a moot court, for which each student will prepare and submit either a brief of counsel or a judicial opinion (40%); and a final examination (40%). Methods of instruction: lecture (3 hours) and discussion section (1 hour); you must register for both the lecture and discussion section. Prerequisite: A basic understanding of American institutional politics and American history. Some exposure to political theory is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

Pol. Sci. 415. The American Chief Executive.

Section 001 The American Presidency

Instructor(s): M. Laracey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411; or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the office of the American Presidency, both in terms of its historical development and its current characteristics. The course begins with the foundations of the office, and then moves on to the processes by which presidents get elected, organize their administrations, manage the executive branch, and pursue their domestic and foreign agendas. The second half of the course considers how administrations manage the executive branch and pursue their domestic and foreign agendas. The second half of the course considers how presidents function in a complicated system of shared political power and intense public interest, focusing on interactions between the presidency and Congress, the courts, interest groups, the media, and the American public.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 419/CAAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

Instructor(s): Vincent Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. And the course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers and the outputs in terms the political process. And the course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms of public policies. And finally the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

Student evaluation will be based on two exams and a 10 page paper. Of course, participation in each seminar is expected. The course will have three to four texts that will be selected later. Finally, the methods of instruction will include lectures, and classroom discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 420/Comm. 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 423. Politics of the Metropolis.

Instructor(s): M. Laracey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine local politics in America, with a particular emphasis on urban issues and civic engagement around those issues, such as suburbanization, urban sprawl, the shifting character of economic and racial conflicts in American cities, and the interrelationships among these and other issues. As part of the course, students will engage and study these issues both in and out of the classroom.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2-3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Instructor(s): Pierre Landry (libite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~compap/NEWhome/courses/PS428/main.html

This course seeks to convey an overall understanding of the evolution of China during the tumultuous twentieth century, with a strong focus on post-Mao reforms. While concerned primarily with domestic developments in the PRC, the course also considers the impact of the global arena on China, the effect and implications of the democratization of Taiwan, and the issues China poses in international politics. The course presumes no prior knowledge of China. Three hours of lecture and one of discussion per week. Term paper and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Pol. Sci. 432. Law and Public Policy.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science, including Pol. Sci. 111 or its equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The past three decades have seen a marked increase in judicial participation in public administration and policy-making at all levels of government. This is true not only in the United States but in numerous other countries where the "judicialization of politics" is currently taking hold. This course will examine this process from both a historical and a comparative perspective. The class will be divided into two central parts. Part I will trace the evolution of judicial policy making in the United States. In this context we will consider both the efficacy and the legitimacy of judicial intervention in political controversies surrounding racial relations, abortion, and environmental regulation. In pursuing these interests, we will read legal and social science literature on courts, evaluate claims of critical legal scholars who write about limits of the law, and assess empirical and historical literature on the impact of courts in effecting social change. Part II will undertake a comparative investigation of the place of courts in several foreign countries and the influence of American models of judicial policymaking upon developments elsewhere. In this instance our focus will be on the nature and source of national legal cultural differences and the extent to which this variation is likely to persist in a world marked by the growing globalization of both markets and law. For this term the prerequisites for this course are: One of the following three courses: PS 412, PS 413, PS 414.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

Pol. Sci. 442. Governments and Politics in Western Europe.

Instructor(s): Judith Kullberg (kullberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the last decade, the politics of Europe have been profoundly transformed by the collapse of communism, the development of the European Union, and the expansion of NATO. This transformation involves the blurring of distinctions between East and West, the spread of democracy and the market economy from the Atlantic to the Urals, and the expansion of transnational institutions that have the potential of uniting Europe economically, politically, and militarily. This course will explore these changes through a comparative study of the politics of European nations. Beginning with the established democracies of Western Europe, and moving eastward toward the new democracies of Central and Eastern Europe, the course will examine the development and performance of representative democracy, the determinants of national wealth and economic growth, and the causes and character of basic societal and political conflicts. Particular attention will be given to the processes and problems of democratization and economic transition in post-communist Europe. The course will conclude with an exploration of the process of European unification and assessment of the opportunities and challenges presented by unification to the members of the EU.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 444. Government and Politics of Russia.

Instructor(s): Pascal

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the dramatic political, economic, and social changes in the Russian Federation, with an emphasis on institutional development. Using the tools of comparative politics to analyze historical and contemporary events, we will address the following questions, among others: (1) How do Soviet-era politics continue to impact Russian politics? (2) Why did we not predict the Soviet collapse and what might this tell us about predicting future changes? (3) How are the processes of democratization and "marketization" emerging in Russia and how do they affect one another? (4) What does federalism mean for Russia? Although this course is a lecture course, I encourage participation. Students are expected to follow current events in Russia. Course requirements include a final exam, one or more short papers, and a choice between a midterm exam and a longer paper.

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Pol. Sci. 446. Law and Development.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course seeks to understand the significance of law for various aspects of economic development. Classes probe the legal definition of the "economic actor". Who may buy and sell or invest and use society's limited resources? In what ways can law promote or hinder competitive markets in developing country contexts? How does law shape productivity and innovation? What challenges do resource scarcity and legal pluralism create for the impartial and effective dispute resolution? What shapes effective communication of the law? The legitimacy of law and the legal process? Readings are broadly comparative, with a slight emphasis on examples from African, Russian, and historical contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 448. Governments and Politics of Latin America.

Instructor(s): Guillermo Rochabrún

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 140 or 440; or a course on Latin America elected through another department. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The object of this course is to give an overview of the scenario of Latin American politics and its links with social structure and international affairs and processes. Starting with the historical background, the course will give a special emphasis on central policies of our times, in issues as population, economic stabilization and economic structure, and the multiple meanings of democracy. Guillermo Rochabrún, a visiting professor from Peru, will give the course from a Latin American vantagepoint.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 450. Political Modernization in the Developing World.

Instructor(s): Guillermo Rochabrún

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W99/PS450/index.html

The basic theme of this course is the expansion of modern political institutions towards the developing world. Main subjects will be: The public and the private, the public and the political, the Nation-State (as the main form of modern political communities). Different approaches in the passages from "traditional" to "modern" societies. What political modernization can mean. A comparison of States and nations formation in developed and developing worlds. Guillermo Rochabrún, a Peruvian visiting professor, will give the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 453. Government and Politics of the Middle East.

Instructor(s): Kemal Kirisci (kirisci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~kirisci/pols45399.htm

The Middle East has long been characterized as a unique region plagued by conflict, instability, lack of democracy and inefficient non-market economies. Images of the Middle East frequently include violent scenes of conflict and war, extravagance associated with oil revenues, repression of opposition and dissent in domestic politics, fundamentalism and intolerance not to mention the absence of "normal" politics with political parties, parliaments and elected governments. Often many attribute this "reality" of the Middle East to the dominant role of religion and radical ideologies in the governments and societies of the region. Many of the conflicts in the region, ranging from the Arab-Israeli one to the Iran-Iraqi war and the water conflict between Turkey and its Arab neighbors, are often explained from the perspective of this "reality". Yet, the Middle East since the early 1990s has entered a period during which considerable progress has been achieved towards greater cooperation and peaceful resolution of conflicts as well as some degree of democratization and economic liberalization.

This course is organized into three sections. The introductory section examines the history and politics of the emergence of the modern state system in the Middle East during the first half of this century. This section will seek to answer the question how did a whole region that was once ruled by the Ottoman Empire became divided into a string of Arab states, Israel and Turkey? The main part of the course focuses on a discussion of political development in the region and will be guided by such questions as: what is the nature of the "state" in the countries of the Middle East? Why did some states became "republics" and others became "monarchies"? ; why did in some states relatively representative forms of government emerge compared to authoritarian regimes in the others?; why did some countries develop into relatively diverse market economies while others became state run economies?; what has been the forces of change and transformation in the nature of these states and societies? The last section will explore the link between some of the conflicts in the region, in particular the Arab-Israeli/Israeli-Palestinian conflict and domestic political factors and developments. Questions such as: what were the causes behind the almost century old conflict between Arabs and Jews/Israelis?; what were the factors that brought about the possibility of a peace and reconciliation process to be launched in the early 1990s?; will peace and regional cooperation ever stand a chance in the Middle East or will the Middle East remain a unique region characterized by instability, violence and conflict?, will be examined in this section.

Course requirements will include: (i) one midterm plus an optional make-up exam; (ii) a short term paper (6 to 8 pages); (iii) a final exam (those students who have done prior work on Middle Eastern politics may elect to substitute a research paper of 15-20 pages instead of the final exam); (iv) participation in class discussions and quizzes based on assigned readings. A short simulation game will be played enacting the negotiations between Israel and the Palestinian Authority with the purpose of better understanding the complexities and difficulties associated with the peace process. Each participant will be expected to play the role of a political and governmental leader. The course will be web enhanced and the use of the Internet will be encouraged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 460. Problems in World Politics.

Section 001 Theories of International Relations

Instructor(s): Robert Pahre (Pahre@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pahre/ps460.html

Students study both theories of World Politics and how to theorize in general. While we study familiar theories, such as Realism, Marxism, or rational choice, the course emphasizes both the philosophy of science behind theories and hands-on experience working with them. Students write several problems sets and complete in-class worksheets that provide practice in both inductive and deductive reasoning as well as hypothesis testing in several settings. Both what we know and how we got to know it are central to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 468. Cooperation and Conflict in the International System.

Instructor(s): Douglas Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The title of this course is misleading. Events have dismantled the communist international system. The title for the course is being changed, and more accurately might be: "Cooperation and Conflict in the International System." We begin by discussing what the international system is, consider the possibility of multiple international systems, and describe some of the history of the modern international system(s). We then turn to consideration of patterns of cooperation and of conflict within the system. We will seek to understand why it is that some members of the system can cooperate in rather remarkable ways, while at other times overt conflict erupts. When discussing cooperation we will pay close attention to arguments about why international cooperation should be especially hard to achieve, and will speculate on ways to overcome these difficulties. Students will be awarded grades based on their performance in two exams and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2-3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 469. Politics of International Economic Relations.

Instructor(s): Madeleine Hosli (mhosli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 160. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Political and economic processes tend to be strongly interrelated. This course introduces students to classical theories of political economy and provides an overview of contemporary theories of international political economy (IPE). On the basis of a reader and four crucial IPE books, the relationship between politics and economics is analyzed for a series of important policy domains, such as trade policy and international financial and monetary relations. In addition, the course provides an overview of international institutions dealing with political-economic challenges, such as the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund, and studies the relationship between domestic politics and international economic processes. The course is run as a lecture, with opportunity for discussions. Requirements include studying the assigned readings, writing two 6-8 page papers, a midterm and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 470. Comparative Foreign Policy.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches to foreign policy analysis. Particular attention is given to assessing approaches that attempt to explain behavior, such as spending in alliances, without reference to the states' domestic political systems; to those that emphasize the key role of internal political processes in explaining how states behave internationally, and to those that suggest that for many states similarities across issue area may be more crucial in defining the policy process than the nature of the states themselves. There is a midterm, a paper, and the final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 471. The American Foreign Policy Process.

Instructor(s): J. David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course has several objectives: to provide the advanced undergraduate student with: (a) an understanding of the global and domestic context within which U.S. foreign policy is formulated, executed, evaluated, and modified; (b) alternative interpretations of the policy process and context; (c) methods by which these interpretations can be compared and tested against the empirical evidence; and (d) the ability to evaluate past policy decisions and propose future ones. We also hope to enhance the student's ability to read, analyze, and write in a manner that is conceptually precise, analytically rigorous, and semantically clear.

There will be a few short abstracts, memos, and analyses, plus one larger written assignment. There will be assigned reading in: (a) two or three required texts; and (b) in the scholarly journals. This is not an "oral textbook" course; therefore lectures will be minimal and informal, but rigorous and interactive. This is not the best course for students who are passive, or excessively concerned with admission to law school.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-2 Waitlist Code: 1, To get an override, the student must be a graduating senior and bring writing samples and a copy of transcript.

Pol. Sci. 481. Junior Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s): John Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to Honors concentrators with junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a seminar that is designed to introduce students to the Honors program in political science and the process of research design leading to the defense of a thesis prospectus. Students must be admitted to the program before enrolling in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Students must be admitted into the Honors program before being allowed to enroll; applications are due by early November.

Pol. Sci. 482/Econ. 483. Positive Political Economy.

Instructor(s): Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Economics 483.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 488. Political Dynamics.

Instructor(s): Christopher Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Will a single presidential candidate emerge from the primaries or will we have a brokered convention? Do arms races lead to war? Why do popular movements get started, grow, and then often subside without accomplishing their goals? Is the earth growing warmer and what should be done about it politically? Questions of this kind are not easily answered with unaided intuition. Social systems grow organically, and their parts interact in different ways at different times. Feedback loops cause many reforms to have the opposite of the intended effect. The purpose of this course is to bring systems thinking to bear on political dynamics. A few simple but powerful mathematical ideas will be taught and applied to a variety of political issues. Students will learn to experiment with dynamics and forecasting on personal computers, using primarily graphical methods. The course is meant to be experimental and applied rather than theoretical. A prerequisite of one prior course in political science is suggested.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 Introduction to Political Economy. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Robert Franzese (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~franzese/#_1_4

The course explores the impact of politics on the economy and of the economy on politics. Our approach to this broad subject matter will be positive as opposed to normative. I.e., we are interested in understanding, i.e., theoretically explicating, a set systematic relationships which may exist between features of the socio-politico-economic environment, not in commenting on the justness of those relationships. E.g., does the periodicity of elections induce cycles in economic policy and perhaps thereby outcomes, and, if so, how?

The course proceeds via an in-depth reading of six great books spanning the substantive realm of political economy: first a broad theoretical overview (Olson), then studies of (2) electoral politics and economic policy in the U.S. (Tufte), (3) partisan politics and economic policy in the U.S. (Hibbs), (4) politics and economics in developed democracies (Hall) and in (5) developing countries (Bates), and (6) the international economy and domestic politics (Rogowski).

Class meetings: partly lecture, partly discussion; Reading: 110 pp./wk. +/-; Writing: three short papers, one intermediate-length paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 492. Directed Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study course on an individual research topic that is developed between an individual student and a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Pol. Sci. 494. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Mohr (lmohr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a seminar for seniors who are working an on Honors thesis. Students must be admitted to the Honors program before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 001 Law & Society in Environmental Disputes. Political Science 412 or 413 is recommended but not required

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will consider the role of law and legal institutions in the development of environmental policy and the management of environmental disputes. Through analysis of a broad array of environmental controversies, the following issues will be considered: Ecological, ethical, and economic justifications for environmental regulation; private versus public law approaches to environmental problems; the promise and limits of economic and institutional alternatives to environmental regulation and litigation; environmental lawsuits as a tool of political mobilization and social change; and the influence of legal norms and practices on socio-economic inequalities in the distribution of environmental burdens.

The class will be structured in a seminar format. Consistent attendance, advanced preparation, and active participation are expected.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2-3 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

Pol. Sci. 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 002 Decision-Making in Organizational Settings

Instructor(s): Martha Feldman (msfeldma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will take the case of the Challenger Shuttle disaster as one of the primary vehicles for exploring how cognitive processes, organizational dynamics, and political contexts influence the process of decision making. The course will explore normative and descriptive models of decision-making. The role of small group dynamics, national and organizational culture, organizational and political structures, and uncertainty and ambiguity in decision-making will be among the issues examined in the course. I expect students to be prepared to engage in discussion during class. Some class sessions will involve experiential learning. Students will write several papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5: Come to the first class.

Pol. Sci. 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 001 The Political Economy of Natural Resources

Instructor(s): Michael Ross (mlross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is designed to provide advanced undergraduates with an overview of recent scholarship on the political and economic facets of natural resource use, particularly in developing states. Among the topics we will consider are the reported link between resource scarcity and violent conflict; the problems of governing common resources, at both the local and global levels; the impact of resource wealth on economic development; and political disputes over water, petroleum, timber, fisheries, and hard rock minerals, particularly in the developing world. A familiarity with economics will be helpful. Students will be expected to write a major paper that draws on both theoretical materials and original research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 001 Arab-Israeli Conflict. See Also Political Science 353

Instructor(s): Raymond Tanter (rtanter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rtanter/ps498w99syl.html

Just as the Cold War ended, the Arab-Israeli conflict is closing. Hence, the seminar does not treat the conflict as "eternal." The course discusses the historical background of the Arab-Zionist dispute, final status issues in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, outstanding questions in the Israel-Syria peace process, links between the Arab-Israel zone and the Gulf, and the expanding role of religion in the Middle East. Strife between Islamists and secular actors is at the core of new conflicts in the area. As Muslim and Jewish ideologues are increasingly at odds with secular parties in Arab entities and in Israel, these zealots are a fit subject for study.

Conferencing on the Web, COW, (ps-498-w99) provides students a forum for discussing current issues in the peace process. Grade weights are 40% for a midterm, 40% for a final research paper (20 pages text MAXIMUM, using Internet sources and Turabian Style Guide), 20% for COW. The seminar meets at a computer site.

Core ideas include crisis as an opportunity for diplomacy; bargaining and negotiation strategies; global, regional, and domestic factors that explain conflict and cooperation; security dilemmas; deterrence failure; overestimation of threat; miscalculated escalation; loss of control as a bargaining tactic; preemption; lowest common denominator consensus decision-making; impact of war on the peace process; alliance politics; force and diplomacy; impact of anomic violence on the peace process; external threats and group cohesion; the effect of religious extremism on the peace process; cognitive screens and threat perception.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

Pol. Sci. 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Instructor(s): Helen Graves (hmgraves@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

University of Michigan Political Science department invites junior and senior political science students to apply for placements with legislators (Democratic/Republican in Lansing), Michigan Senators and Representatives; the Michigan Executive, the Courts, the Bureaucracy; interest groups; legal profession; private sector (governmental affairs offices of the major auto companies); international (Ontario Provincial Legislature, Canadian Consulate); and the Media. Three hours of political science credit (involves 16 hours per week in placement, five seminar sessions with Director, journal assignment, and interview).

What do I get out of the Political Internship program? (1) Preview a career in the political world. (2) Visible, unique work experience for your résumé. (Job interviewers always take note of Political Internships.) (3) A letter of recommendation for Law/Graduate School or job. (4) Networking and leadership training experience.

Keep in mind only 25 students are placed. Students are asked to reserve 16 hours a week or two days for office/placement work. Carpools are created for Detroit/Lansing. Course requirements also include a journal and Political Interview.

A Personal interview is Required. These will be scheduled during the week of Monday, November 9 through Friday, November 13. It is necessary to fill out an application form and provide a 3-5 page writing sample. Contact Helen M. Graves, Ph.D., 5629 Haven Hall, (734) 647-7995 (office) or call (734) 994-5563 (home). E-mail: hmgraves@umich.edu. First come, first serve basis. Once the spots in the course fill up, placement stops.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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