Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Sociology (Division 482)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Sociology.


Soc. 100. Principles of Sociology.

Instructor(s): Andrew Newman (aenewman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

C. Wright Mills once wrote, "The sociological imagination enables us to grasp history and biography and the relations between the two within society. That is its task and promise. To recognize this task and this promise is the mark of the classical social analysis." As a general introduction to sociology this course seeks to fulfill that promise. Through readings, lectures, and discussions, you will develop a working understanding of the concepts and phenomena of interest to sociologists and social scientists in general. The subjects researched by sociologists overlap in large part with those studied by economists, political scientists, and psychologists. These subjects include, for example, the role of social relations and culture in forming personality, and the importance of institutions and organizations in understanding politics, economics, social problems, and individual lives. Although sharing some of the assumptions and methods of other social and behavioral sciences, sociologists tend to take different perspectives than other social scientists. Understandably, this course emphasizes those approaches that are fairly unique to sociologists and, perhaps, anthropologists. For example, sociology emphasizes the importance of personal biography, immediate context, and collective history for understanding human behavior. We summarize these factors in the term: social structure. Much of the course is an attempt to define and identify social structure. We can contrast this structuralist approach to that of individualism, a way of thinking about people and their world that is profoundly embedded in American culture and society, and reflected for example in most psychological theories of human behavior. Because you are already probably so well accustomed to the individualist view, individualist explanations will probably seem more "obvious" and "true" than the alternative structuralist understanding we present. However, as a discipline with the aspirations of science, sociologists seek to determine whether what seems obvious is, in fact, true. Accordingly, we consider the diverse methods sociologists employ in their research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 100. Principles of Sociology.

Instructor(s): Michelle Harris-Reid (hreid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sociology can be defined as the systematic study of social interactions. This course will focus on and make connections between personal experiences and the larger historical and social forces. In particular, students will learn the vocabulary of the discipline, and will be challenged to understand social diversity and inequality from a sociological perspective.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 101. Person and Society: An Introduction to Sociology Through Social Psychology.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Barber (jebarber@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400 or 401. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an introduction to sociology through social psychology. The course focuses on how individuals develop self-concepts, attitudes, values, and beliefs; how individuals interact with others (including other individuals and groups of individuals); and how society affects individuals. We will examine a wide range of topics within social psychology, including socialization, self-esteem, attitude formation, threats and promises, aggression, interpersonal attraction and relationships, group conflict, deviant behavior, and crowd behavior. Particular attention will be paid to the relevance of these themes and processes in other nations and cultures. Coursework will include three exams, two short written assignments, and participation in a discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology.

Section 001 Introduction To Sociology Through the Study of Populations

Instructor(s): William Axinn (baxinn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400 or 401. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to sociological reasoning through the fields of Population Studies and Social Demography. Students will explore macro-level social topics such as the size, growth, structure, and distribution of human populations. Students will also examine the micro-level processes which shape populations: disease, death, marriage, sex, childbearing, and migration. Special emphasis will be given to how both these macro- and micro-level phenomena socially impact our daily lives. This will include an introduction to social-demographic approaches to the study of current social issues including, over-population, teenage pregnancy, unwanted childbearing, divorce, the environment, and immigration to the United States. The course will take an explicitly comparative perspective, examining population related problems and issues in both rich countries in North America, Europe, and East Asia and poor countries in Africa, South and Central America, and South and Southeast Asia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 001 Population and Health in Transitional Societies

Instructor(s): Barbara Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar examines and discusses major changes and challenges in population processes and health in societies in a process of substantial social, political, and economic transition, with a focus on China, the countries of the former Soviet Union, and South Africa. A special focus is the situation of for the poor and for members of different ethnic groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 111/UC 111/AOSS 172/NR&E 111. Introduction to Global Change II.

Instructor(s): Timothy Killeen (tkilleen@umich.edu), Maclin

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.sprl.umich.edu/GCL/

See University Courses 111.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 122/Psych. 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended primarily for first- and second-year students. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index3.html

See Psychology 122.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Soc. 210. Elementary Statistics.

Instructor(s): Ann Takata (takata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course prior to their last term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stat. 100, 265, 311, 402, 405, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/soc210/w1999/index.html

This course introduces to the student three important aspects of statistics. (1) Data collection: the methods through which researchers gather data, such as opinion polls, surveys, experiments, and sampling. (2) Data description: graphical and numerical procedures for summarizing and describing a data set. (3) Data analysis: ways in which data can be used to make decisions, to make predictions, and to draw inferences. Problem sets emphasize hands on experience in working with data, and provide opportunities to apply and interpret statistical procedures and results. Personal computers will be used for some assignments, but no prior experience with computers is necessary. No prior exposure to statistics or mathematics (aside from arithmetic and basic algebra) is assumed. Grading will be based on three exams (including the final) and problem sets. Class time includes lectures as well as discussion/laboratory sessions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 302/Amer. Cult. 302. Introduction to American Society.

Instructor(s): Andrew Newman (aenewman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the American political system: how it emerged, how it works, how it increasingly affects and is affected by other elements of American society, such as culture and the economy. You are probably familiar with the basic elements of American government (separation of powers, elections, etc.). But you may be surprised to learn that many important aspects of the current political system either were not part of the original U.S. Constitution, or currently exist with little or no legal basis. These include: political parties and primaries; interest groups; social movements; and government bureaucracy. We will spend the term examining the historical origins, justifications, and operations of these important, unofficial institutions, as well as the conditions of their transformation. We conclude with an appreciation of the increasing significance of the international scene.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 303/CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Instructor(s): Michelle Harris-Reid (hreid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the social history (past and present) of racial minorities in the United States. We will begin by defining the principal concepts that sociologists use in their analysis of race relations. Central to this discussion will be the understanding of "racism" NOT as "prejudice," "ignorance," an "attitude," or a "set of beliefs" but rather as a comprehensive historical system that changes over time. After this theoretical discussion, we will survey the historical experiences of five racial minorities, namely, African Americans, Chicanos/Mexican Americans, American Indians, Puerto Ricans, and Asian Americans. The course will conclude with a discussion of possible solutions to the racial dilemmas faced by the U.S.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Soc. 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Instructor(s): Karen Honeycutt (khoneyct@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with Soc. 397. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A laboratory course in research techniques, emphasizing elements of research design, measurement, sampling, data analysis, and statistical inference. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches will be covered. Individual research projects are conducted to reinforce learning. You should be prepared to take computer labs. Prior knowledge of Windows-based computers and popular software (such as Microsoft Word and Excel) is helpful but not required. Grading will be based on exams and individual research projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 320/Psych. 310. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Ruby Beale (rubeale@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index14.html

See Psychology 310.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor. Contact 936-1875 for details.

Soc. 321/Psych. 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A combined total of 8 credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 311.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Soc. 383/Psych. 383. Introduction to Survey Research I.

Instructor(s): Regula Herzog (rherzog@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 383.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 001 Project Community. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($22) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($22) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sociology 389 is know as "Project Community" and "Trained Volunteer Corps." Students combine four to six hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem-solving. Over 40 sections offer settings that include working in school classrooms with "at-risk" children and youth in a variety of tutoring, chemical dependency, mentoring situations; in the adult and juvenile criminal justice system; with adult literacy; with the homeless; and with elderly, the mentally ill, the disabled, and in hospitals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 002 Advanced Seminar in Leadership. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Chesler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($22) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($22) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~salead/SAL-Education.html

See http://www.umich.edu/~salead/SAL-Education.html.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 003-044 Project Community Sections
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($22) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($22) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~ocsl/Proj_Community/

See http://www.umich.edu/~ocsl/Proj_Community/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit in the same or different terms.

No Description Provided.

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Soc. 397. Junior Honors in Sociology.

Instructor(s): Pamela Smock (pjsmock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Soc. 210; prior or concurrent enrollment in Soc. 310 or 512; and Honors standing in sociology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar devoted to the study of significant theoretical positions and issues through the reading and discussion of original sources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 399. Senior Honors in Sociology.

Instructor(s): Karin Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors standing in sociology. Soc. 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objective is preparation of a significant research paper. Possible projects are canvassed in fall seminar meetings; students then do research under a faculty member until March; papers are presented to the seminar for criticism in the Spring.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 404/Am. Cult. 404. Hispanic-Americans: Social Problems and Social Issues.

Instructor(s): Sylvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing. (3). (Excl).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Latinos or Hispanics are the second largest minority group in the U.S. Comprised of those whose origins, however near or far, come from Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America, Latinos share a basic culture. At the same time, Latinos comprise very variegated experiences in the U.S. Both the reasons for migration from their countries and their processes of incorporation in American society vary widely. Together we will seek to understand both what they share and what is unique. This course explores the experiences of the major groups of Latinos in the U.S. Chicanos, Mexican immigrants, Puerto Ricans, Cubans both for what it tells us about them and for the social problems and social issues they serve to exemplify, such as issues of political vs. economic migration; poverty and its impact on the family; immigration law and its consequences; the changing nature of work; and the unfolding drama of revolution. In addition, we will utilize different theoretical perspectives to help us explain the contrasting experiences. Among the theoretical models we will examine will be the "push-pull" theory of migration; assimilation vs. internal colonialism as models; the impact of state assistance and immigration laws; middleman minority vs. the ethnic enclave vs. the ethnic economy as models of immigrant adaptation; social movements vs. revolution as major transformations that have shaped the histories of Latinos in the United States. The requirements for this class consist of two exams that will be written tests in class, and one book review of social science book written on the experience of Latinos in the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 405. Theory in Sociology.

Instructor(s): Mark Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 305. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an intensive examination of current debates within sociological theory through a focus on a range of substantive topics. The emphasis will be on social structural approaches but we will examine alternative perspectives, including cultural ones, as well. The substantive topics on which we will focus include race and ethnic relations, gender, the sociology of development, social movements, social structure and health, labor markets and social inequality, corporations and markets, and business-government relations. The class will be run as a seminar, with an emphasis on discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 426/Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Instructor(s): Pierre Landry (libite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~compap/NEWhome/courses/PS428/main.html

See Political Science 428.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 429. Social Institutions of Modern Japan.

Instructor(s): Ann Takata (takata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology, anthropology, political science, or economics. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/soc429/w1999/index.html

Recent media coverage of Japan suggests that Japanese society is very different from American society. Although many things are called the same in both countries, their meanings are not quite the same, or they function very differently. Is Japanese society really different, and if so, in what ways? In this course, we will examine the major social institutions of postwar Japan, with an emphasis on the most recent years. Social institutions are practices, relationships, and organizations that structure the daily lives of people. What are the structural features of the major social institutions in contemporary Japan, and how do they function? Why do these institutions look and function the way they do, and what are their implications for the daily lives of the Japanese society, and how Japanese society responds to them. Topics covered include demography, family, neighborhood, community, socialization, the educational system, the workplace, social welfare, minorities, crime, social conflict, religion, and internationalization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 435. Urban Inequality and Conflict.

Instructor(s): Don Deskins (ddeskins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one course from Soc. 435 and 535. (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An examination of the social and spatial factors affecting the location, social organization, structure and functioning of American cities. Although both the internal arrangements and external connections of cities are analyzed, heaviest emphasis is placed on the examination of the internal arrangements of cities within the context of contemporary urban problems found in the American city will be utilized as example and the basis for discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 447/WS 447. Sociology of Gender.

Instructor(s): Karen Honeycutt (khoneyct@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Why are so many women on diets? How do men and women decide who does the housework? Why do McDonald's workers think that running the counter is a woman's job, but working the stove is a man's? When is rape a crime? What is the significance of children's "cooties" games? How do fraternities construct masculinity? In this course we will explore these and/or similar questions with a focus on gender and gender inequality. We will ask: how is gender constructed? What are the main causes and consequences of gender inequality? What are men's and women's experiences of gender? How do race, class, and sexuality interact with gender?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 450. Political Sociology.

Instructor(s): Jeff Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationship between economics and politics. Basic concepts such as power, state, nation, and class will be introduced and applied to the analysis of the development and change of political systems in historical and comparative perspective. The course examines (a) the historical origins of democracy, fascism, and communism as political systems, (b) imperialism, development, and revolution in the Third World, and (c) class, class coalitions, and the state in post New-Deal U.S. politics. Introductory courses in sociology or political science desirable but not required. Lecture/discussion; midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 454. Law and Social Organization.

Instructor(s): Dan Sharphorn (dsharphn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Course Aims and Objectives: This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti-discrimination laws, university rules and regulations, and others. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 455/Rel. 455. Religion and Society.

Instructor(s): Terrence McGinn (tjmcginn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ultimate reality (the focus of religion) becomes understood quite differently as people pursue religious quests within different social contexts. This course uses sociological methods of inquiry to explore the emergence of new religious movements, the ways that organizations respond to extraordinary experiences like mysticism and the ecstatic, the kinds of impact social forces have on organized religion, and the ways that religion, in turn, affects other areas of social life.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 460. Social Change.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the most significant social changes of the late 20th century is the process known as globalization, which promises to transform ways of life worldwide. This course will explore the character, causes and consequences of globalization in its current form. Particular attention will be paid to impacts on levels of poverty and economic inequality within and among countries, (b) the scope and quality of democracy, (c) the global environment, (d) the goals and power of organized labor, and (e) the situation of women in developing countries. The course will also consider whether alternative forms of globalization are possible, and whether globalization is reversible. Texts employed will include Marx, Polanyi, Wallerstein, Leslie Sklair, Paul Krugman, Steven Yearly, Geoffrey Garrett, Barnett & Cavanagh, and Greider.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 463/Comm. Studies 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Instructor(s): Jill Edy (jaedy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Communication Studies 463.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Soc. 465/Psych. 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Instructor(s): Andy Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will examine how people become social deviants and how relevant social institutions contribute to this process. Early portions will examine the legal enforcement, judicial and corrections systems which together determine who will be designated deviant and with what consequences. Later portions will focus on particular forms of deviance (e.g., delinquency, theft, fraud, rape) with a view to understanding and evaluating the several theoretical perspectives that have been proposed to explain their genesis and perpetuation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 467. Juvenile Delinquency.

Instructor(s): Karen Honeycutt (khoneyct@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents an introduction to juvenile delinquency. It explores the historical development of crime and deviance among youth as a social concern. We then examine theoretical explanations of the causes of delinquency (with emphasis on relation to the life course), societal response to delinquency through the juvenile courts, and the dilemmas of treatment. Primary focus is on youth violence, street crime, gangs, graffiti, and drugs. Contours of the troubled lives frequently associated with delinquency are explored through film and biography. Issues examined include: balancing individual rights and community interests; cultural and historical variation in criminal and deviant behavior; processes through which delinquent behavior arises; the role of state power and the limits of the criminal sanction; proposals to try juveniles as adults; and recent challenges to liberal approaches to justice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 468. Criminology.

Instructor(s): Jeff Morenoff (morenoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of crime and social control. After reviewing the definition and nature of crime in both classic and contemporary theories, we explore the major theoretical perspectives on the causes of crime and compare their ability to explain criminal activity in a variety of contexts. Some of the specific topics we will explore include patterns of criminal victimization and offending, crime and policing in local communities, trends in youth violence and homicide, the contours of criminal careers, family influences on crime, urban poverty, and racial segregation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 472/Psych. 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001, 002 May be elected ECB
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402 and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/381/

See Psychology 381.001, 002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

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