Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Spanish.


Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. It is strongly recommended that students who began Spanish at another college or university also take the placement test. Students must check with the Course Coordinator for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.


Spanish 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, three exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a Final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing Spanish 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a Final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 111. Designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish 112 is designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~span231/

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills of students; to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to build vocabulary; and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade based on a series of quizzes and exams designed to assess ability to read, write and understand Spanish plus periodic written work, and oral class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, history, culture, and outlooks, of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade is based on exams, designed to assess ability to speak, understand, read and write Spanish, plus periodic written work (including compositions) and oral class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 005 – Revolution, Love, Sex and Sexuality in Spanish and Latin American Poetry, Music, and Cinema

Instructor(s): John Thompson (jpthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will practice the four skills involved in language learning. A special emphasis will be given to learning the mechanics of poetry, which will deepen the students' understanding and appreciation of this form of expression that has lost popularity in our age due, in part, to popular music. The latter is easier to understand because its rhythm and message come to us. Poetry, on the other hand, does not come to us; rather we must go to it and actively work at discovering its rhythm and embedded message. We will therefore work at uncovering the hidden music of poetry as well as the messages it transmits.

In music we will study and listen to songs by Pablo Milanes, Victor Jara, Mercedes Sosa, Sui Generis, Joaquin Sabina and Ana Belen. Other singer poets may be included. For Cinema, students will be required to watch, in their own time, several movies: El Norte by Gregory Nava, La ley del deseo by Pedro Almodovar, La noche de los lapices, El callejon de los milagros and Fresa y chocolate by Tomas Gutierrez Alea. Other movies may be added. Grammar, which will be of the level of Spanish 232, will be taught and worked with on a daily basis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 007 – La Juventud En España

Instructor(s): Maria Perez-Bazan (mperezba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mperezba/spanish.htm

What does being joven in Spain mean? Are young Spaniards different from Americans? These questions and more will be answered in this course, which depicts young people in Spain regarding: ideology (moral codes, political and religious views), lifestyle (entertainment, activities, eating habits, language, sex, etc.), education (life at universities and other institutions), professional world, generation conflict (political and ideological changes, relationship with parents…), youth problems (unemployment, lack of perspectives, drug abuse...), young foreigners in Spain, etc.

Students will have the chance to deal with a series of audio and video materials (songs, interviews, films…) as well as texts from newspapers, magazines, literature, etc. Although most material will be provided in class, a course pack will be offered. The course requirements include tests, two compositions, short projects, a final project and an oral exam.

This course is specially recommended for students wishing to spend a semester abroad in Spain.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 009 – The History and Culture of the Borderlands

Instructor(s): Holly Cashman (hcashman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the history and culture of the U.S./Mexico border through literature, film, and writings in the social sciences while building upon the reading, writing, listening and speaking skills developed in earlier Spanish classes. After an introduction to a wide range of themes such as language, public health, education, and (im)migration, students will be able to pursue an individual topic of interest related to the course through a self-designed final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 011 – Art of the Iberian Peninsula

Instructor(s): Alicia Giralt (agiralt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have humans changed a lot in 32,000 years, or do we still have the same needs, fears, and desires? In this class, we'll try to answer these questions through the analysis of that which defines humanity: art.

Using selected works dating from 30,000 BC to mid 20th Century, we'll analyze the who, what, why, where, when, and how of Iberian Peninsula Art, that is, the art created by men and women who inhabited that land. During the ancient period, we'll look at the diverse contributions of Iberians, Greeks, and Romans. In the Middle Ages we'll explore the mutual influence of Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Finally, in modern times, we'll study artists such as Velázquez, Goya, Gaudi, and Picasso.

Films, slides, and transparencies will complement written materials. Participation in classroom discussions is essential. Students will write two papers and give one presentation on the art or artists of their choice. Several quizzes will be given during the term to assess student comprehension. Grammar will be contextualized.

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Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 026 – Hispanic Culture Through Community Service. Students Must Register for Section 026 (Lecture) and one of Section 027, 028, or 029. Any registered student who is absent from either workshop will be automatically dropped from the course

Instructor(s): Ligaya Figueras (figueras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will be a query into the nature of the Hispanic community through the topic of culture. Not only will we be discussing Hispanic in a seminar setting, but we will be providing two hours a week of community service in after-school tutoring to the Hispanic community in southwest Detroit. The goals of this course, then, are two-fold, and encompass the objectives of both a service-learning course and a fourth-term Spanish language course. You will be exploring and "testing" different cultural understandings of service, including, and especially, your own. This course in not just about providing a service in terms of logging hours, but to go beyond, through analysis, reflection and evaluation to address the variety of needs of the Hispanic culture in our community.

Note: Class meets M 2-4 pm. Students must also reserve ONE of the following time slots to complete the service component of the course: Tues, Wed, or Thurs 2-6pm. Students MUST register for both section 026 and ONE of the service sections 027, 028, or 029. Students are required to attend training workshops on Saturday, January 16, and Saturday, January 23, 1999. Any registered student who is absent from either workshop will be automatically dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 030 – Hispanic Culture Through Community Service. Students Must Register for Section 030 (Lecture) and one of Section 031, 032, or 033. Any registered student who is absent from either workshop will be automatically dropped from the course

Instructor(s): Dosinda Garcia-Alvite (dosindag@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will be a query into the nature of the Hispanic community through the topic of culture. Not only will we be discussing Hispanic in a seminar setting, but we will be providing two hours a week of community service in after-school tutoring to the Hispanic community in southwest Detroit. The goals of this course, then, are two-fold, and encompass the objectives of both a service-learning course and a fourth-semester Spanish language course. You will be exploring and "testing" different cultural understandings of service, including, and especially, your own. This course in not just about providing a service in terms of logging hours, but to go beyond, through analysis, reflection and evaluation to address the variety of needs of the Hispanic culture in our community.Note: Class meets T 2-4 pm. Students must also reserve ONE of the following time slots to complete the service component of the course: Mon, Wed, or Thurs 2-6pm. Students MUST register for both section 030 and ONE of the service sections 031, 032, or 033. Students are required to attend training workshops on Saturday, January 16, and Saturday, January 23, 1999. Any registered student who is absent from either workshop will be automatically dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 270(358). Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275(361) or 276(362). A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

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Spanish 275(361). Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dennisdp/Spanish.275.html

Spanish 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

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Spanish 276(362). Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dennisdp/Spanish.276.html

Spanish 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 290(307)/Amer. Cult. 224. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Frances Aparicio (franapar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses the particular linguistic needs and interests of students of Hispanic descent and heritage born and/or educated in the United States interested in acquiring a formal and structural knowledge of Spanish, in further expanding vocabulary at the abstract and professional levels, and in developing their skills in formal and professional writing. Sociolinguistic aspects of Spanish in the United States – code-switching, linguistic attitudes, bilingualism – also will be explored in relation to the politics of cultural identity. Short weekly assignments and exercises emphasizing the differences between oral and written modes of communication and between formal and informal Spanish will be required, along with a midterm and final exam. Readings will include cultural essays, literatures, and scholarly articles.Note: This course meets the Spanish Language Requirement for the Latino Studies Concentration.

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Spanish 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Maria Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Business 305 is intended to increase the student's vocabulary and knowledge about the Spanish-speaking business world. Since the class is conducted in Spanish, students must have an understanding of the fundamentals of Spanish Grammar. The course will use authentic material, rely on group discussion, various readings, and exercises. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a project, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course will allow students to develop their Spanish business knowledge to be more effective in the business world.

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Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to narrative fiction, poetry, drama, argumentative essays, and critical literature. It emphasizes the formal aspects of each genre, including appropriate terminology and analytical/ interpretive approaches.

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Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Instructor(s): Alex Herrero (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the way texts are constructed to produce meanings or convey messages to readers. Students will become familiar with basic concepts and the terminology used in the analysis of literary texts in Spanish, and will engage in various practices essential to the investigative processes such as bibliographical research (with practical exercises on using the MLA International Bibliography, HAPI, First Search, Expanded Academic Index to find articles and previous criticism), and will learn the norms used in writing academic essays. Students will also become familiar with the development of major literary movements in Spain and Latin America throughout time. In this course, three short papers (5-7pp) will be required: one devoted to narrative, one to poetry, one to theater, making use of the research tools and conceptual frameworks necessary to produced reasoned, analytical studies of particular texts in Hispanic literature.

Textbook:
Virgillo, Valdivieso, and Friedman. Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica.

Additional Readings:

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Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to narrative fiction, poetry, drama, argumentative essays, and critical literature. It emphasizes the formal aspects of each genre, including appropriate terminology and analytical/ interpretive approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to narrative fiction, poetry, drama, argumentative essays, and critical literature. It emphasizes the formal aspects of each genre, including appropriate terminology and analytical/ interpretive approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 332. Short Narrative in Latin America/Spain.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the genres of the short story and novella as practiced in various Hispanic cultures. Lends itself to a variety of topical focuses.

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Spanish 340(375). Introduction to Iberian Cultures.

Literature

Instructor(s): Manuel Camarero

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers a reflection on contemporary Spain by examining historical, political, social, and artistic aspects of Iberian Peninsula, from Roman times up to today, with an emphasis on contemporary Spanish society.

Students will follow discussions in class on a variety of topics:

Text Books

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Spanish 341(376). Introduction to Latin American Cultures.

Literature

Instructor(s): David Rojinsky (rojin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to explore and problematize the classificatory dualities which have traditionally been used to organize, describe and define "Latin American" culture[s]. These opposing categories will include civilization/barbarity; mestizo culture/indigenous culture; Latin Americans/Latinos; nationalism/imperialism; the colonial/the prehispanic; high culture/popular culture; modernity/tradition; el Macho/la Malinche. To this end, we will make use of movies and writing (ethnography, historiography, literature and cultural analyses).

Throughout the course, students will be expected to explore their own role as "ethnographers" and to be conscious of what they are doing when they read, write and talk about "Latin America". (Are we simply inventing our own "Latin America" in the classroom or are we making an attempt to dialogue with a "real" Other?) For this reason, the first few classes will involve looking at contemporary definitions and notions of "culture" and also discussing the ideological ramifications inherent to the representation of a given "culture". This preliminary theoretical overview will serve as a prism through which to articulate the rest of our study.

Evaluation will be based on a series of written activities (an informal personal log [in Spanish] to be turned in once a month (4 x 5% =20%); a Midterm and Final [5-page] research essay [in Spanish] [15% x 2]); and a series of mini-quizzes (4 x 5% = 20%). Students will also be required to participate in a group project [10%] which will be presented orally (in Spanish). Class participation will be worth 20% of the overall grade. Classes will be conducted in both Spanish and English.

Films may include: Camila (Argentina) Los olvidados (Mexico) Fresa y chocolate (Cuba) Lone Star (USA) Men with Guns (USA)

Required Texts: El Popol Vuh; El laberinto de la soledad, Octavio Paz; Memory and Modernity. Popular Culture in Latin America. William Rowe and Vivian Schelling. (There will also be a course pack of relevant articles and readings)

Coursepack readings may include several of the following theorists and primary sources:
Cornel West, Coco Fusco, Cristóbal Colón, Johannes Fabian, José Agustín, José de Acosta, Clifford Geertz, Carlos Monsivaís, Simón Bolívar, Dick Hebdige, Elena Poniatowska, José Martí, James Clifford, Carlos Fuentes, José Vasconcelos, Edward Said, Julio Cortázar, José Mariá Arguedas, Nestor García Canclini, Graham Hancock, Rosario Castellanos, Mary Louise Pratt, Linda Chávez, Gabriel García Márquez, Jean Franco, Frances Aparicio, Che Guevara, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, Sandra Cisneros, Frida Kahlo, Guillermo Gómez Peña, Augusto Monterroso, Rosario Ferré, Fray Bernardino de Sahagún, John Beverley, Juan Flores, D. H. Lawrence

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Spanish 355. New World Spanish.

Literature

Section 001 – Spanish Varieties in the US

Instructor(s): Teresa Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines linguistic aspects such as variation-change in the lexicon, phonology, and syntax of Spanish language dialects in the United States. We will also cover topics of Spanish in contact with English, first and second language acquisition. Course will be primarily conducted in Spanish.

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Spanish 371. Survey of Spanish Literature, I.

Literature

Instructor(s): Frank Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the Medieval and Renaissance periods in Spain. It will make use of literary, historical and cultural materials to give an overview of the multiple reality of Spain during these centuries. Issues such as Arabic culture, the role of the converted Jews, the Inquisition, wealth and poverty, social changes will be discussed. Our reading material will be in both book and course-pack form. Although the official requirement is one literature course before taking this course, it is strongly suggested that students take two courses before taking Spanish 371. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish.

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Spanish 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 001 – Poetry Workshop

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is poetry for? What work does it perform in human societies? While diverse human cultures throughout history have produced poetry, in the modern era poetic practice – writing, listening, reading – has become increasingly marginalized. What possibilities are gained and lost by giving poetry this special, marginal status? If poetry stands apart as a dense zone of language use that conveys intense experience, does it have the power to intervene in everyday life, changing our perceptions, beliefs, and thoughts? In this course we will address these questions, while exploring the poetic practice of six Latin-American and Spanish poets: Cesar Vallejo, Pedro Salinas, Federico Garcia Lorca, Pablo Neruda, Octavio Paz, and Alejandra Pizarnik. Students will also engage in poetic practice – broadly defined – by joining in a dialogue with these poets and choosing from a menu of possible oral and written responses to their poetry. For example, possible oral responses include giving dramatic readings (individually or in groups) and staging mock interviews with poets. Written responses include interpretations, translations (Spanish to English or English to Spanish), and original poems (if students desire). As a final project we will hold a poetry slam in which students impersonate poets of their choice and read from their work.

Evaluation is based on written work and oral participation. The midterm and final exams are based on poems discussed in class.

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Spanish 382. Survey of Latin American Literature, II.

Literature

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a panoramic view of Latin America's literature and writers from nineteenth century to contemporary texts. It focuses on different genres such as narrative, poetry and essay, and will explore themes such as: the construction of Latin American identities and national cultures through race, gender, and sexualities, writing, representation and subjectivity. Brazilian texts translated into Spanish will be included. Three exams and one essay (5-6 pages).

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Spanish 414/Rom. Ling. 414. Background of Modern Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Steve Dworkin (dworkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which the spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, and the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard. The course will be taught in Spanish. The textbook will be made available in a course pack. In addition, graduate students will be required to read the chapters dealing with Spain in Roger Wright, Late Latin, and Early Romance. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of Spanish.

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Spanish 420/American Culture 420. Latin American & Latino/a Film Studies.

Literature

Instructor(s): Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 270 or 275. A previous course in Film & Video, or Latin American history, or Latino Studies. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Comparative survey of historical and theoretical developments in Latin American and Latino/a audiovisual media, with an emphasis on the cinema. Topics include: industrial production from the 30s to the 50s; new waves (New Latin American Cinema); Latin American women's cinema; popular video; European and American co-productions of the 80s and 90s; documentary expression; national cinemas (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Venezuela); and the Latino/a avant-garde.

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Spanish 456. Golden Age.

Literature

Instructor(s): Frank Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will deal with the major writers of the Spanish Golden age: Garcilaso, Fray Luis de Leon, Gongora, San Juan de la Cruz, Quevedo, Lope de Vega, Calderon, and Tirso de Molina. Among the works to be read will be poetry, narrative, and theater. We will focus both on the cultural and literary aspects of the texts in question.

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Spanish 464. Spanish Romanticism.

Literature

Instructor(s): Manuel Camarero

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers a reflection on Spanish Romanticism by examining representative works of Spanish Romantic literature, with an emphasis on contextual readings. Students will follow discussions in class on a variety of topics:

Texts:

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Spanish 467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Modern Spain.

Literature

Section 001 – Literary and Artistic Movements in Modern Spain: The Encounter with Modernity

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spain's encounter with modernity is the focus of this course, as we examine the radical transformation of its culture from 1880 to 1920. The literature of that time reveals the cultural effects of the modern experience: the accelerated, fragmented experience of the metropolis, the impact of photography and film, the changes in gender roles, and the demise of the old Spanish Empire. Among the different strategies for addressing modernity, some texts attempt to create its "mirror image" through meticulous observation and description of social life. Others flee from the horrors of the modern world and create exotic, fantastic, or anachronistic fictional worlds. And after the turn of the century, literature sought increasingly to modernize its style through innovative experimentation. As we examine how the modern world affected literature, we will also consider how literature in turn affected the modern world, by defining and shaping people's perceptions and social practices.

Readings include short stories, novels, essays, plays, and poetry by Galdós, Pardo-Bazán, Valle-Inclán, and Machado. Students should be able to read 30 to 40 pages carefully for each hour of class. Assignments include two papers (7-8 pages each), several short writing assignments, two exams, and a group oral presentation. Evaluation is based on written work and class participation. Discussions are conducted in Spanish. Note that 467 is a topics class that may be repeated for up to nine credits.

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Spanish 468. Spanish Theater of the Twentieth Century.

Literature

Instructor(s): Andrew Anderson (andander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Over the course of the term we shall be reading seven plays by a number of Spain's foremost modern dramatists, including Jacinto Benavente, Jacinto Grau, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramón del Valle-Inclán and Federico García Lorca. Stress will be laid on the close reading of texts, thought at the same time we shall trace how playwrights seek to distance themselves from standard dramatic norms, often by stressing or enhancing the theatricality of their own works. Furthermore, there will be some consideration of the issue of literary text versus text for the stage, a gap which is particularly wide in some of the works to be read. The class will be a mixture of lecture, discussion and informal oral presentation; evaluation by attendance, participation, and several medium-length papers spaced through the term.

Instruction will be exclusively in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Spanish 470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries.

Literature

Instructor(s): Javier Sanjines (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce students to Latin American Colonial literature, 1492-1800s. We will study representative texts from different genres: chronicles, epic poetry, drama, and novel. Some of the questions we will discuss are: the discovery/invention of America, colonization and conquest; resistance discourses; women in the colonial period; the novel and the emergence of the nation. We will read Columbus, Cortés, Alonso de Ercilla, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Guaman Poma, Son Juana, among others. Primary readings will be paired with criticism in English and Spanish.

Course requirements: Students will be responsible for two short papers (7-10 pages) and weekly oral/written presentations. The short assignments will consist of a list of questions intended to guide the student through the readings.

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Spanish 473. Colonial/Postcolonial Studies in Latin-American Cultures.

Literature

Instructor(s): Christian Fernandez Palacios

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

En este curso estudiaremos textos relacionados con el " descubrimiento" de America, la Conquista y la Colonia escritos por autores europeos y americanos. Se discutiran temas como la traduccion, la otredad, exotismo y la formacíon de identidades americanas. La base para la discusion de estos temas seran la iconografia, peliculas y testos literarios e historiograficos del periodo colonial. Cristobal Colon, Hernan Cortes, Bernal Diaz, Cabeza de Vaca, ElInca Garcilaso, Huaman Poma, son algunos de los autores que discutiremos.

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Spanish 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 001 – Autores Super-Estrella: Contemporary Latin American Film and Fiction

Instructor(s): Alex Herrero (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Following Jean Franco's notion of autor-superestrella this course examines the "star status" of contemporary Latin American writers through the reading of novels as well as film adaptations of literary works by García Márquez, Puig, Donoso, Carpentier, Borges, Fuentes, and Sábato. We will study how major innovations of contemporary Latin American narrative prompted this new status by looking at the following: (1) the rejection of the assumptions and forms of conventional realism; (2) the novels' underlying theory of reading; (3) their simultaneously apocalyptic and utopian vision of history; and (4) the controversial concept of "magical realism". We will discuss how film adaptations propose specific readings on the works of Latin American novelists and contributed to the commercial success of Latin American fiction. Audiovisual materials – such as interviews with the authors, documentaries, and fragments of film adaptations – will be periodically presented and discussed in class. Requirements: 2 papers (40%, midterm and final), 4 brief reports (20%), oral presentations (20%), and active participation (20%).

Tentative Reading List:

  • Gabriel García Márquez. Eréndira, Crónica de una muerte anunciada
  • Manuel Puig. Pubis angelical
  • José Donoso. El lugar sin límites
  • Ernesto Sábato. El túnel
  • Jorge Luis Borges. El hombre de la esquina rosada
  • Alejo Carpentier. Concierto barroco
  • Carlos Fuentes. Gringo viejo

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    Spanish 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

    Literature

    Section 002 – Representation of the African Diaspora in Cuba and Brazil.

    Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Cuba and Brazil are the areas with the major concentration of African population in the Americas. Millions of Africans from different cultural backgrounds, philosophical beliefs and languages – nago, bantu, ashanti, male, fula, arara, calabar, yoruba – survive the Atlantic middle passage. The main purpose of this course is to study the cultural, social, and philosophical contributions of these diverse groups and the way they have been "imagined" by the intellectual elites of these nations. Using examples from ethnography, sociology, film, documentary, and narrative we will deconstruct, criticize, and examine some of these cultural narratives which include Gilberto Freyre's Casa Grande & Senzala, (Masters and Slaves) (selections), Sobrados e Mucambos, (The Mansions and the Shanties) (selections); Fernando Ortiz's, El baile y el teatro de los negros en el folklore de Cuba, and Los negros curros (selections); Lydia Cabrera, El monte (1st chapter); Ruth Landes, The City of Women; Alejo Carpentier's El reino de este mundo (The Kingdom of this World); Miguel Barnet's Biografia de un cimarron (Autobiography of a Runaway Slave); and some films and documentaries such as, Pereira dos Santos' Quilombo, Gloria Rolando's Ogun (1995), and Julio Ramos' La promesa (1996). Three papers from 5-8 pages and a final paper (20 pages) will be required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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