Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in Music History and Musicology (Division 678)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for Music History and Musicology.


It is possible for LS&A students to elect a concentration program in music, and this program is described in the LS&A Bulletin. In addition, music courses are frequently elected by LS&A students not concentrating in Music. Courses in Music History/Musicology, Composition, and Music Theory are elected for LS&A credit. Some of these courses can be used in an area distribution plan. LS&A students may elect music PERFORMANCE courses for degree credit, but this credit counts toward the maximum twelve non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward an AB/BS degree or twenty non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward a BGS degree. Courses in Music History/Musicology, Composition, Music Theory, and Performing Arts Technology are listed in the Time Schedule under the School of Music.

The following courses count as LS&A courses for LS&A degree credit.


MHM 140. History of Western Art Music: Music of the U.S. and Euro-American Music Since World War I.

Instructor(s): Richard Crawford

Prerequisites & Distribution: Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the concentration advisor. (2). (HU).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Music of the United States and American and European music since World War I. Includes both vernacular and art-music traditions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

MHM 240. History of Western Art Music: Classic Era Through World War I.

Instructor(s): R. John Wiley (rjwiley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the concentration advisor. (2). (HU).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

History of music from the Preclassic era to World War I.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

MHM 341. Introduction to the Art of Music.

Section 001 Introduction to the Written Musical Tradition of the Western World

Instructor(s): Albin Zak (azak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Musicology 341 is a course designed to improve classical music listening skills through an understanding of the music's organizational principles and historical development from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Experiencing fully the beauty and mystery of music requires conscious listening, an activity that engages our minds as well as our senses. The aim in this course is to acquire and to use musical knowledge in the service of increasing musical awareness, sensitivity, and enjoyment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MHM 346. The History of Music.

Instructor(s): Gregory Barnett (gregoryb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of music from the Classic Era to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MHM 347. Opera of the Past and Present.

Instructor(s): David Crawford (davidcr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a lecture survey dealing with selected operas from 1600 to the present. The case studies discussed will be representative of works frequently performed today. Normally we discuss several opera composers each week, students being asked to see videos of selected scenes, to hear audio cassettes, and to do selected readings from periodical literature. Readings and discussions will take varied approaches, considering operas as music compositions, as show pieces for voices, as samples of literature, and as cultural icons. Translations are provided for any works in foreign languages. Students will also be urged to attend an opera performance and to write a paper describing the experience as a personal experience reflecting social cultural, and aesthetic issues. Grades will be determined by two hour exams and a final exam. No musical background necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1,4

MHM 405. Special Course.

Section 001 Making Records: A History of Rock Recording. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Albin Zak (azak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will chart the development of rock record production over the course of the past fifty years. Through readings and critical listening, we will examine various aspects of record production as they relate to compositional process and the formation of musical style. These include, among other things, recording and mixing techniques, the roles of the various participants in the collaborative process, aesthetic stances and beliefs, and the ways in which rock recording constitutes a field of rhetorical expression. Source readings will include interviews with producers, engineers, songwriters, musicians, and arrangers. Musical examples will be drawn from a broad range of rock styles and genres.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

MHM 406. Special Course.

Section 001 Music of Hawaii. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Amy Stillman (akstill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces issues of cultural identity, ethnicity, and stereotyping, through an examination of representative genres of Hawaiian music and dance, and their associated performance practices, social uses, and functions.The historical development of Hawaiian music and dance is a concise study of music and colonialism. Loss of Hawaiian sovereignty occurred in cultural as well as political and economic domains: the marketing of Hawaiian music throughout this century exemplifies the imposition of external projections.The first part of the course is a survey of genres of Hawaiian performance. In the second part of the course, we examine processes of stereotype formation, and strategies by native Hawaiians to reclaim the cultural terrain. The goal is to understand how Hawaiian music and dance figure into ongoing decolonization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MHM 407. Special Course.

Section 001 The Music of Beethoven. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Steven Whiting (stevenmw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course surveys Beethoven's music in the appropriate stylistic, biographical, historical, and cultural contexts. Emphasis will fall on the analysis and interpretation of finished works (rather than sketch studies and "compositional genesis"). Weekly reading assignments will supplement the lectures and introduce students to the breadth of approaches taken in current Beethoven scholarship. While designed primarily for undergraduate and graduate students in music, non music majors who can follow scores and are acquainted with the rudiments of music theory will also be welcome. Grades will be based on in-class participation, two analytical essays (10-12 pages), and two examinations (midterm and final).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MHM 408. Special Course.

Section 001 Gilbert & Sullivan: "Victorianisms". (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Kathryn Lowerre (klowerre@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This interdisciplinary seminar will consider playwright W.S. Gilbert and composer Arthur Sullivan's perennially popular collaborations, the Savoy Operas, from early works Thespis, The Sorceror, and the 'flagship' H.M.S. Pinafore through their final joint effort, The Grand Duke. Unlike the varied London productions they competed with for audiences during the nineteenth century, the Savoy Operas have been regularly performed ever since their premieres, and although subject to a variety of interpretations and adaptations, remain quintessentially Victorian. Spanning a quarter century of Victorian life (1871-1896), the Savoy Operas address a variety of aspects and issues of Victorian life including the relationship between Britain and its Empire, reflections on the glorious past, the function of the law (and lawyers!) in society, the roles and education of the social classes (especially women). Particularly in the later works, there seems to be tension between Gilbert's message and Sullivan's musical expression, and the relationships between text, drama, and music will be discussed throughout the term. Emerging from the intersection of 'serious' (and not-so-serious) opera and the 'low brow' pleasures of the Victorian music hall and musical revue, the Savoy Operas occupy a special place in the history of opera and the history of musical theater. By popularizing (and parodying) the musical gestures of opera and 'civilizing' the broad humor of the music hall and the pantomime, Gilbert and Sullivan created a uniquely balanced entertainment. Readings will include work by scholars of music, theater, literature, and history as well as Gilbert's texts. Listening to (and often viewing) productions will also be required (including attending the spring show of the local G&S Society, The Gondoliers). Grades will be based on three short papers or presentations, a longer final project, and participation in class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MHM 414. Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Opera.

Section 001 History of Opera, 19th-20th Centuries

Instructor(s): Kathryn Lowerre (klowerre@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the various forms of opera from 1800 to the present, including standard repertory works (Verdi, Wagner, Puccini...) in a variety of European national traditions (Italian, French, German, Eastern European) as well as twentieth-century developments, particularly in America (Gershwin, Glass, and beyond). Most of the productions studied are available on video, and we will be considering the whole opera experience sights, settings, and drama as well as sound.Course requirements will include three listening quizzes, four short reading responses (responding to articles from course pack), and a final paper or project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MHM 421. Music of the Classic Period.

Instructor(s): Steven Whiting (stevenmw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Music in the Classic Era surveys vocal and instrumental music in Europe from the style galant of the 1730s to "second-period" Beethoven. Particular emphasis is placed upon genres that emerged during the 18th century: the independent concert symphony, the keyboard sonata, the string quartet, the keyboard concerto, and comic opera. While designed as part of the professional training of musicians and musicologists, the course may be taken by anyone who reads music and is conversant with rudimentary harmonic analysis. Evaluation is based on three analytical papers (7-10 pages), two examinations, and classroom participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MHM 437/Phil. 437. Philosophy of Music.

Instructor(s): Kendall Walton (klwalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in philosophy; or previous course work in music. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Philosophy 437.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

MHM 450. Music in the United States.

Instructor(s): Gregory Barnett (gregoryb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A lecture survey of American music from the 18th century to the present, including both formal and informal traditions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MHM 457/CAAS 400. The Musics of African Americans.

Instructor(s): Travis Jackson (travieso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-music concentrators must have permission of instructor. Musical background preferred. Undergraduates only. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a survey of the varied musics made by African Americans from slavery to the present. Particular attention will be devoted to the relation of musical style and performance to changing historical, social, philosophical, technological, and cultural conditions. Students, while not required to read music, will be expected to develop listening skills in order to distinguish genres, performance styles, and recording techniques. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two non-cumulative examinations, listening assignments coordinated with class readings, concert reports, and a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

MHM 458. Music and Culture.

Instructor(s): Joseph Lam (jsclam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines selected ritual musics of Western and non-Western cultures, such as African American spirituals, Chinese state sacrificial songs, Gregorian chants, and Japanese shomyo. Discussion will cover not only musical and ritual structures and roles, but also cultural and performative processes through which music and ritual meanings are formulated, performed, interpreted, and negotiated.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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