Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in RC Core (Division 863)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for RC Core.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements.

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE WAIT LIST PROCEDURES

Residential College students are given priority in all Residential College courses during the Early Registration and registration periods, and from waitlists. RC courses which satisfy specific Residential College graduation requirement are reserved for RC students only (e.g., RC language courses).

Waitlists of Residential College courses are maintained in the Residential College Counseling Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad. When a course fills, students should contact the RC Counseling Office (647-4359) to be placed on a waitlist if one is being maintained. RC sections of LS&A coursesThese sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.

Intensive Language Courses

Intensive language courses meet in lecture and discussion twice a day four days a week. The language programs have language lunch tables, coffee hours, and other social events. There is a language laboratory in the College, and the language teachers are available for counseling and additional help. If a student begins a new language, proficiency is usually attained in one year through the Residential College program.

FLAIR: Foreign Language Applied to Independent Readings.

To provide more opportunities for the use of foreign language skills, one-hour Independent Studies can be arranged for the following purposes:

  1. Completion of supplementary readings in a foreign language for a class taught in English
  2. Completion of readings assigned in English in the original foreign language.

Students enrolling in FLAIR should discuss the proposed readings with the course instructor. The Independent Study proposal should then be presented to either Mireille Belloni (French), Janet Shier (German), or Eliana Moya-Raggio (Spanish) for further suggestions and approval. The course should then be elected through the RC Counseling Office and an Independent Study number (Core 205, 305, or 405) assigned. Upon completion of the project, the work will be evaluated and credit granted by the sponsoring foreign language coordinator.


RC Core 190. Intensive French I.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Mireille Belloni (mbelloni@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in French 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 191. Intensive German I.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 194. Intensive Spanish I.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Olga Lopez-Cotin (olcotin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 205. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 209. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 290. Intensive French II.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Dominique Butler-Borruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 190. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in French 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 291. Intensive German II.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 191. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 293/Russian 203. Intensive Second Year Russian.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Alina Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 193 or Russian 102. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Russian 201 or 202. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian 203.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 2, 3

RC Core 294. Intensive Spanish II.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Maria Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 194. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 305. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 307. RC Practicum in College Team Teaching.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (1). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 309. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 310. Accelerated Review-French.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to bring students to the level of proficiency defined in the brochure "The French Program at the Residential College," in the four linguistic skills. Students who take 310 typically have not reached this level in two or more skills, but do not need the intensive course 290 to do so. Accelerated Review 310 is taught on a semi-tutorial mode with hours arranged to meet the particular needs of the students. In this course, emphasis is placed on correctness and fluidity of expression in speaking and in writing. Speaking skills are developed though weekly conversation sessions on current topics; personalized pronunciation diagnoses are administered and exercises prescribed. Writing skills are refined through a review of deficient grammar points and composition assignments which give students the opportunity to improve the accuracy and expressiveness of their style. In addition, exposure to primary source materials (current magazines or newspapers) and to texts of cultural and literary value develop reading ability and vocabulary. Listening skills are trained in informal conversational exchanges and in lectures with note-taking in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 314. Accelerated Review-Spanish.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Marjorie Zambrano (mzambran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for students with, a fairly extensive background in Spanish, who are too advanced for second year intensive, although communicative competency is deficient in one of the basic language areas which would prevent success in a readings course. Attention is given to the development of reading skills through exposure to primary source materials such as magazines and newspapers. Plays and short stories may also be included. The course includes periodic listening comprehension tests. Weekly written compositions are assigned and evaluated for accuracy of expression and style.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Qu'est-ce que C'est Que Beur? : Bridging Identity Gaps With(in) Beur Literature

Instructor(s): Stephen Bishop (sbish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since the end of the Algerian conflict, a new (unofficial) category of French citizen has emerged. The children of Maghrebian immigrants, first generation children of North African parents, have come to be a defined class in French society. Borrowing from a popular street slang, they became known as "beur" (ar-abe devient abe-ar devient beur). But what does this label mean? Who are they, and should they even be a "they"? What problems are associated with being beur not really Arab, but not really French? We will seek to better understand these issues through a series of some of the earlier novels produced by this generation. We will also look at some media consideration of beur identity and issues from mainstream French society and finish with a look at some of the theoretical articles written on beur culture since it became a fashionable topic of academic discourse. Some questions to investigate include the following: Why are so many beur novels written as first person children's narratives? What effect does this style have? What does it mean to exist between two cultures? How does one define a culture identity by language, religion, origin, food, music...? Is it possible not to have a definable cultural identity? Does being beur mean not being French? Arab? Why has the "beur question" become so popular (enough so to even have a course devoted to it)? This list is by no means exhaustive.

Students will keep a weekly journal of their thoughts on and reactions to course material, conduct media (including the Internet) research on beur culture in France, and make at least one presentation of their findings to the class, write a short paper (2-3 pages), and produce a final project of 6-8 pages.

Works to be studied include Georgette! de Farida Belghoul, Béni ou le paradis privé d'Azouz Begag, Le thé au harem d'Archi Ahmed de Medhi Charef, and several newspaper, magazine, and theoretical articles. Some films are a good possibility as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 002 Défense et accusation: la littérature en procès

Instructor(s): Rebecca Wilkin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Where does one draw the line between fact and fiction? When does literature spill over into "real life"? In this course, we will examine poetry, plays, and novels from the seventeenth century to the present that either led to public controversy/trils or were written in reaction to legal sanctions. We will attempt to discern what was at stake in the scandal surrounding each work from as many contemporary points of view as possible. What was each author attempting to accomplish with his or her poem/play/novel? Why did it inflame the censors' ire? Who took sides and why? We will read a novel that leads prosecutors to confuse characters with real people, we will witness a playwright making a spectacle of the powers that be, we will analyze the strategies figurative language offers an incarcerated poet pleading for liberation. Most of all, we will attempt to determine how textual works of art and the controversies they provoke participate in the establishment and evolution of cultural norms. All of our readings bring to the fore some sort of transgression of societal norms; controversial issues we will address include (homo)sexuality, religion, money, and women, as well as the artist's role in society.

Literary works to be studied, in part or whole, include: La Maison de Sylvie (Théophile de Viau), Tartuffe (Jean-Baptiste Molière), Lettres et billets galant (Marie-Catherine Desjardins, alias de Villedieu), Encyclopédie, ou dictionaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers (Denis Diderot), La religieuse (Denis Diderot), La philosophie dans le boudoir (Donatien Alphonse François, marquis de Sade), Madame Bovary (Gustave Flaubert), Les fleurs du mal (Charles Baudelaire), and Journal du Voleur (Jean Ganet), as well as selections from contemporary commentators, opponents, or proponents of each work. We will view Jacques Rivette's censored 1966 movie adaption of La Religieuse and others if students so desire. In order to understand the legal, economic, and historic context in which each author wrote, students will also read from several (not exclusively French) critical/historical works. Students will be required to participate in class, write weekly reaction papers to readings, and produce a 6 to 8 page final paper. In addition, students will complete two creative assignments: (1) a (series of) poems(s), a short story, or a mini-play (4 to 6 pages) on an aspect of a contemporary French trial that each student will research him/her/self; and (2) a mock trial (in groups) of a work studied in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 321. Readings in German.

Foreign Language

Section 001 The Romantic Experience

Instructor(s): Erika Paslick

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will ask, how did the German romantics interpret the human experience? We will seek answers by sampling some of their theoretical writings as well as their artistic expressions in poetry, drama, song cycles, and paintings. At the same time we will reinforce out ability to read, write, and speak German. Students will be asked to keep a literary journal in which they will record their responses, essays, notes, commentary, and sketches so as to generate a romantic work of their own in German. This will replace the traditional topic papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Three Latin American Novels

Instructor(s): Eliana Moya-Raggio (elmoras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students read three short novels connected by a common element, the role played by memory in the re-construction of events and in the re-ordering of the past. The reading (in Spanish) is carefully guided by different pedagogical instruments. Students write three papers, work with presentation of the material and are expected to participate actively in class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 002 Official Culture and Dissidence in Spain (1938-1975)

Instructor(s): Olga Lopez-Cotin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 003 Education and Social Change

Instructor(s): Maria Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the relationship between educational practices and social change in Latin American, specifically Cuba, Nicaragua, and Chile. Basing our analysis on Freirean educational theory students will achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the correlation existing between problems and educational system and societal problems in general, as well as alternative educational practices which would transform the classroom into a dynamic learning center. The latter part of the course will question the validity of Freirean educational theory and its applicability to the United States, particularly in the case of Puerto Rico.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 004 Women in Latin American Cinema

Instructor(s): Margarita de la Vega Hurtado (delavega@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the role of women directors in Latin American Cinema. We will see a diverse sampling of films made by women in Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Venezuela and Chile. We will read texts about these films and interviews with the filmmakers. The course will provide the students with an increased knowledge of oral and written Spanish. The students will write a long paper and a journal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 370/French 370. Advanced Proficiency in French.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mireille Belloni

Prerequisites & Distribution: RC Core 320 or French 235. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 405. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee ($90) required.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 409. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001 Election form Must Be Accompanied by Signed Prospectus
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 410. Senior Project.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section Core 410 Permission of Concentration Advisor Required
Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 490. Honors Thesis.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 11:33 AM on Fri, Feb 5, 1999.